RECENTLY FOUND HEROES

 

from ALL PAST WARS

 

 

HONOR THE DEAD BY HELPING THE LIVING”

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

"Returning with Honor"
March 03, 2017

KHAMMOUANE, Laos --

With 1,614 service members missing in action from the Vietnam War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) deploys hundreds of service members,
DoD civilians, and contractors all over the world in hopes of returning our nation’s fallen heroes.

Recently a team of 59 personnel completed DPAA’s second Laos mission of fiscal year 2017, covering the Central East region of Laos. From rice patties to mountainsides,
the teams excavated thousands of square meters of land recovering important evidence relating to missing servicemen lost during the war.

“I’m very honored to have been part of this initiative to bring our missing home,” said U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chris Walgenbach,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “This mission has been the most unique part of my 13 year career in the military and I know others feel the same way.”

Every team member plays an important role in mission success. Whether that is the recovery non-commissioned officer setting up the sites,
or the recovery leader collecting scientific data, working together ensures nothing is overlooked and the safety of the team remains number one priority.

Due to the efforts of the teams, Laos representatives handed over possible remains to the U.S. to be repatriated and welcomed back on American soil after 48 years.
Upon arrival the possible remains will be transported to DPAA’s laboratory for examination and possible identification.

“During this mission I have worked along side some of the greatest men and women I’ve had the pleasure of meeting,
and being chosen for the repatriation ceremony was a perfect way to end such a great mission,” said U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Andrew Brod,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “It is truly an honor to be bringing closure to the families of our fallen service members.”

The hard work and continued dedication of these teams makes it possible for DPAA to fulfill our nations promise and
provide fullest possible accounting for our missing service members to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Ameil Fredeluces, edic, and U.S. Marine Corps. Staff Sgt. Eddie Ludwig, explosive ordinance disposal technician,
remove dirt from units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos,
January 29, 2017.  Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual
reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting
for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency dig units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 26, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing
U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the
fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Jack Kenkeo, life support investigator, shovels dirt from the screening stations during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Francis Sangiamvongse, linguist, screens soil with local villagers during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA
Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 29, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search
of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Lynn Rakos, scientific recovery expert, waters hard soil to help with excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission
in the Khammovan Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

In March of 2017, Making the effort to thank the troops for what they do out in the field means everything.
With a DPAA recovery team in Quang Nam Province, two hours west of Da Nang, Vietnam.

 

 

Disappearance of two Madison airmen in 1953 remains a mystery

The unsolved case called "one of the most enduring mysteries of the Great Lakes"
has been the subject of numerous articles and a film on Canadian television.

The UW-Madison story involved a group of six students and staff members who were part of a team that unearthed a World War II U.S. fighter aircraft—
and possibly remains of its pilot—in the ground under a farm field in France this summer.

The team used ground-penetrating radar and a photo taken by a British reconnaissance plane two days after the May, 1944
crash of the P-47 Thunderbolt flown by 1st Lt. Frank Fazekas.

 

 

 

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II.
Divers of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and Civil Defense of Grado, Italy,
prepare for an exploratory dive on the sunken B-24 bomber. 

This B-24 Liberator is the same type of airplane that
Lakewood, Ohio airman Thomas McGraw was flying in when it was shot down and crashed off the coast of Italy during World War II.

A Missing Air Crew Report details the last flight of the B-24 and nose gunner Thomas McGraw of Lakewood, Ohio.
B-24 located in Adriatic; Crewmanis bones sought Ught Lakewood Manis remains crewman Omber crew,am2-2k-28 bold Header from A1.
 

A skull fragment was recovered at the site of a wrecked B-24 bomber
off the coast of Italy that may contain the remains of
Thomas McGraw, of Lakewood, Ohio.

An underwater view of the crash site of a B-24 off Grado, Italy.

 

 

 


 

USS Arizona BB-39

USS Arizona was a Pennsylvania-class battleship built for and by the United States Navy in the mid-1910s. Named in honor of the 48th state's recent admission into the union, the ship was the second and last of the Pennsylvania class of "super-dreadnought" battleships. Although commissioned in 1916, the ship remained stateside during World War I. Shortly after the end of the war, Arizona was one of a number of American ships that briefly escorted President Woodrow Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference. The ship was sent to Turkey in 1919 at the beginning of the Greco-Turkish War to represent American interests for several months. Several years later, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet and remained there for the rest of her career.

Aside from a comprehensive modernization in 1929–31, 
Arizona was regularly used for training exercises between the wars, including the annual Fleet Problems (training exercises). When an earthquake struck Long Beach, California, in 1933, Arizona's crew provided aid to the survivors. Two years later, the ship was featured in a Jimmy Cagney film, Here Comes the Navy, about the romantic troubles of a sailor. In April 1940, she and the rest of the Pacific Fleet were transferred from California to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as a deterrent to Japanese imperialism.

During the 
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Arizona was bombed. After a bomb detonated in a powder magazine, the battleship exploded violently and sank, killing 1,177 officers and crewmen. Unlike many of the other ships sunk or damaged that day, Arizona was irreparably damaged by the force of the magazine explosion, though the Navy removed parts of the ship for reuse. The wreck still lies at the bottom of Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona Memorial, dedicated on 30 May 1962 to all those who died during the attack, straddles the ship's hull.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma BB-37 

The USS Oklahoma was on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. That was the morning that the Japanese Empire attacked the United States by surprise.

The Japanese used dive–bombers, fighter–bombers, and torpedo planes to sink nine ships, including five battleships, and severely damage 21 ships.
There were 2,402 US deaths from the attack. 1,177 of those deaths were from the USS Arizona, while 429 of the deaths were from the USS Oklahoma.

The crew of the USS Oklahoma did everything they could to fight back. In the first ten minutes of the battle, though, eight torpedoes hit the Oklahoma, and she began to capsize.  A ninth torpedo would hit her as she sunk in the mud.  14 Marines, and 415 sailors would give their lives. 32 men were cut out through the hull while the others were beneath the waterline.  Banging could be heard for over 3 days and then there was silence.

After the battle, the Navy decided that they could not salvage the Oklahoma due to how much damage she had received.  The difficult savage job began in March 1943, and Oklahoma entered dry dock 28 December. Decommissioning  September 1, 1944, Oklahoma was stripped of guns and superstructure, and sold December 5, 1946 to Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif. Oklahoma parted her tow line and sank May 17, 1947.  540 miles out, bound from Pearl Harbor to San Francisco.  Today, there is a memorial to the USS Oklahoma and the 429 sailors and marines lost on December 7, 1941, located on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

Ford Island is seen in this aerial view during the Japanese attack on Pearl harbor December 7, 1941 in Hawaii.
(The photo was taken from a Japanese plane.)

 

 

Remember the fallen: In all, 429 people on board the battleship were killed in the attack.
Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.

 

 

Battleship USS Oklahoma unturned hull at the bottom of Pearl Harbor
after the devastating Japanese bombing attack on Dec. 7, 1941.

 

                                                                                                                      

 

 

                                                                                                   The North Texans of Pearl Harbor
                                                                                                      

                                                                                       Their obituaries tell of lives cut short – and of lives well lived.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Memorial at Pearl Harbor

 

 

 

 

 

THE KOREAN WAR, 1950-1957

 

 

 

 

 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following WWII from MICHIGAN - 2471
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Korea from MICHIGAN - 341
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Cold War from MICHIGAN - 4
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Viet Nam from MICHIGAN - 48
 

 


 

RECENTLY FOUND
 HEROES in 2018

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 23, 2018

Navy 2nd Class Durell Wade, 24

 

Navy Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade, 24, Calhoun Mississippi, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Wade was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wade.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Wade's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

Currently there are 73,245 service members still unaccounted for from World War II.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 20, 2018

Navy Fireman 2nd Class John D. Wheeler, 26,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman recently accounted for from World War II are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Fireman 2nd Class John D. Wheeler, 26, of Gaither, Arkansas, accounted for on Aug. 14, 2017, will be buried April 28 in Harrison, Arkansas. On Dec. 7, 1941, Wheeler was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wheeler. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Wheeler.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Wheeler’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
April 19, 2018

Army Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile, 26,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile, 26, of Potosi, Wisconsin, accounted for on February 12, will be buried April 26, in Lancaster, Wisconsin. In late November 1950, Purkapile was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of Unsan, while withdrawing southeast to Yongbyon, North Korea. Following the battle, Purkapile could not be accounted for and he was reported as missing in action on Nov. 28, 1950. By the end of the war, his status was changed to deceased and his remains deemed non-recoverable.

On November 30, 1993, North Korea unilaterally turned over 33 boxes containing remains believed to be U.S. servicemen killed during the Korean War. The remains in one box were reportedly recovered in the vicinity of Okchang-ri, Nyongbyon County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea, which was less than three kilometers from where Purkapile was last seen. 

To identify Purkapile’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today, 7,657 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley,

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Joe M. Kelley, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kelley was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Kelley.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Kelley's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Captured Soldier from Korean War Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Milton M. Beed, 30,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Milton M. Beed, 30, of Meadow Grove, Nebraska, accounted for on Dec. 4, 2017, will be buried April 25 in Norfolk, Nebraska. In February 1951, Beed was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army attacks against units of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the village of Hoengsong, an area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea. After enduring sustained enemy attacks, the American units withdrew to Wonju, South Korea. It was during this withdrawal that Beed was reported missing, as of Feb. 12, 1951.

In December 1951, Beed’s name appeared on a list provided by the CPVF and Korean People’s Army (KPA) of allied service members who died while in their custody. One returning American prisoner of war reported that Beed had died while a prisoner at the Suan Prisoner of War Camp Complex in North Korea. Based off of this information, the Army declared him deceased as of Oct. 31, 1951.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. On May 28, 1992, North Korea turned over 15 boxes of remains believed to be unaccounted-for Americans from the war. 

To identify Beed’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, dental and anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

Missing Captured Soldier from World War II Accounted For
April 18, 2018


Army Pvt. Raymond Sinowitz, 25

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that a U.S. serviceman, captured during World War II, has been identified and is being returned to his family for burial with full military honors. 

Army Pvt. Raymond Sinowitz, 25, of Bronx, New York, accounted for on Aug. 18 2017, will be buried April 23 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On Dec. 8, 1941, Sinowitz was a member of 454th Ordnance Company, 27th Bombardment Group, the Far East Air Force, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands. Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on April 9, 1942, and of the Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942. 

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner; including many who were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to Japanese prisoner of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan on the island of Luzon, Philippines. Sinowitz was among those reported captured after the surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to the Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the remaining years of the war. 

According to prisoner records, Sinowitz died on Sept. 26, 1942, and was buried along with fellow prisoners in the local Cabanatuan camp cemetery. 

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to a temporary U.S. military cemetery near Manila. In late 1947, the AGRS again exhumed the remains at the Manila cemetery in an attempt to identify them. Due to the circumstances of the POW deaths and burials, the extensive commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of the remains could not be individually identified. The unidentified remains were reburied as unknowns in the present-day Manila American Cemetery and Memorial.

In May 2016, the Secretary of the Army granted permission to exhume six graves associated with the Cabanatuan Common Grave 439. On May 11, 2017, the remains were sent to DPAA for identification. 

To identify Sinowitz’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte, 19

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte, 19, ST. LOUIS Mo. killed during World War II, has now been accounted for. 

In the summer of 1943, Politte served as a gunner with the 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force. He was killed while participating in a raid on the Ploesti Oil Refinery complex north of Bucharest, Romania, during Operation Tidal Wave. The goal of the operation was to destroy the refineries in the area in order to hamper the German war effort. During the raid, Politte’s B-24 Liberator aircraft was hit by machine gun fire and crashed. Following the war, his remains could not be identified. 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their assistance in this mission. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Politte’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery Impruenta, Italy, an American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in Neuville American Cemetery, Politte’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Air force Pilot  From Vietnam War Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Air Force Reserve 1st Lt. David T. Dinan, III, 25

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Vietnam War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Air Force Reserve 1st Lt. David T. Dinan, III, 25, of Nutley, New Jersey, accounted for on Aug. 7, 2017, will be buried April 25 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On March 17, 1969, Dinan was a member of the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 288th Tactical Fighter Wing, 7th Air Force, and was the pilot of the number two aircraft in a flight of two F-105s on a strike mission over northern Laos. During the second strafing pass over the target, Dinan transmitted a distress message. The Forward Air Controller then observed Dinan’s parachute enter the jungle, as well as an aircraft crash. Search and rescue aircraft conducted an aerial search and located a parachute and confirmed the death of the pilot, however, due to enemy fire in the area and the hazardous location, his body could not be recovered. The U.S. Air Force subsequently reported Dinan as killed in action.

In March 2014, a joint U.S./Lao People’s Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) team investigated a site near Ban Khap, Xiangkoang Province, associated with Dinan’s loss, recovering personal effects associated with Dinan.

In June 2016, a joint U.S./L.P.D.R. team excavated the same site near Ban Khap, recovering osseous remains and material evidence. The remains were sent to DPAA for analysis.

To identify Dinan’s remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), as well as dental and anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

Today there are 1,586 American servicemen and civilians that are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Army Pfc. John H. Walker,

Army Pfc. John H. Walker, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for. 

On Nov. 24, 1944, Walker was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in action after his unit engaged in fierce fighting on Hill 207 near Schönthal, Germany in the Hürtgen Forest. With no evidence that Walker had been captured or survived combat, his status was changed to deceased on Nov. 25, 1945.

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Kueppers and the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership with this disinterment and recovery. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Walker’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission in Margraten, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in Neuville American Cemetery, Walker’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Marine Corps Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser, 21

Marine Corps Pfc. Clarence E. Drumheiser, 21, Fresno, Ca. killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Drumheiser was assigned to Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Drumheiser died on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Drumheiser’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Captured Soldier from Korean War Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Lester R. Walker, 19

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Lester R. Walker, 19, of Ferriday, Louisiana, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017, will be buried April 18 in Downsville, Louisiana. On Sept. 3, 1950, Walker was a member of Battery B, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when he was declared missing in action in the vicinity of Changnyeong, South Korea, while attached to Task Force Haynes. Based on a lack of information concerning his status, the U.S. Army declared him deceased and his remains non-recoverable.

Despite the efforts of the Army Graves Registration Services (AGRS) and Central Identification Unit (CIU) in Kokura, Japan, more than 800 sets of unidentified remains were buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, as “Unknowns,” including one set of remains designated “Unknown X-2026.” 

During the initial recovery of X-2026, the AGRS interviewed several local villagers who stated that in mid-September 1950, two U.S. prisoners were brought to their village. The prisoners reported to the villagers that they had been captured at the Naktong River near Changnyung. The witnesses recounted that the prisoners were killed by enemy forces, then buried by locals several days later.

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis of information associated with X-2026, it was determined that the remains could likely be identified. After receipt of approval, the remains were disinterred from the Punchbowl on Aug. 13, 2017, and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Walker’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Captured Soldier from Korean War Accounted For
April 18, 2018

Army Master Sgt. Finley J. Davis, 39,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Master Sgt. Finley J. Davis, 39, of Pittsburgh, accounted for on Aug. 8, 2017, will be buried April 19 in North Charleston, South Carolina. In late 1950, Davis was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent Chinese attacks in the Ch’ongch’on River area in northwest North Korea. The battle began on Nov. 25, 1950, when the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) initiated an offensive along the 8th Army front. All 8th Army units were ordered to withdraw on November 29. Davis’ battalion was assigned to provide security for the division. The unit was attacked again by the CPVF and Davis was reported missing in action as of Dec. 1, 1950.

Several repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Davis died Camp 5.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Davis’ remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable. A set of remains marked as X-14024 were processed for identification, but an association could not be made and they were returned to the United States for burial.

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, DPAA requested the exhumation of 22 unresolved individuals, including Davis. Unknown X-14024 was disinterred from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, known as the Punchbowl, on June 17, 2014 and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Davis’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 11, 2018

Navy Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan,

Navy Steward Mate 1st Class Ignacio C. Farfan, Oklahoma,  killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Farfan was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Farfan.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Farfan's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 10, 2018

Navy Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders,

Navy Chief Machinist's Mate Dean S. Sanders, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Sanders was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Sanders.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Sanders' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Naval Aviator Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 9, 2018

Navy Reserve Lt. j.g. Irvin E. Rink, 25,

 The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Reserve Lt. j.g. Irvin E. Rink, 25, of Wichita, Kansas, accounted for on July 10, 2017, will be buried April 16 in his hometown. On Aug. 4, 1943, Rink was a member of Fighting Squadron Twenty Seven (VF-27), when eight pilots flying F4F-4 Wildcat aircraft took off from the Russell Islands, Solomon Islands, to escort a Catalina seaplane on a mission to Enogai Inlet, New Georgia Island. As the seaplane attempted to land at Enogai Inlet, the escort aircraft were attacked by Japanese fighter planes. Following the battle, the element returned to the Russell Islands, however Rink did not return. He was reported missing in action on Aug. 4, 1943. Based on a lack of information regarding his whereabouts, he was declared deceased on Jan. 8, 1946.

In March 2008, Mark Roche, an American diver, photographed an F4F-4 aircraft inverted on a reef approximately 45 feet under water off the northwest coast of New Georgia. He recovered human remains and material evidence from the wreckage and transferred them to the U.S. Consulate in Honiara, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.

In February 2013, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (predecessor to DPAA) team traveled to the Solomon Islands where they received possible remains from the crash site. The remains were sent to the laboratory and consolidated the remains found in 2008.

To identify Rink’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched Rink’s records, and historical evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air force Pilot  From Vietnam War Accounted For
April 6, 2018

Air Force Col. Roosevelt Hestle, Jr., 38,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Air Force Col. Roosevelt Hestle, Jr., 38, of Orlando, accounted for on June 6, 2017, will be buried April 13, 2018 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On July 6, 1966, Hestle was a pilot assigned to the 388th Tactical Fighter Squadron, aboard the lead aircraft in a flight of four F-105s on a strike mission against surface-to-air missile sites in northern Vietnam. As they approached the target, Hestle issued a missile launch warning, and all aircraft began evasive action by diving toward the ground. As the aircraft approached the town of Thai Ngyuen, anti-aircraft began firing at them. Due to the evasive action, the other aircraft lost sight of Hestle. Crews aboard one aircraft observed a large ball rising from the ground, though no crash was observed. Contact attempts were unsuccessful and no parachutes or distress signals were seen or heard. Due to hostile conditions in the area, search and rescue attempts could not be initiated and an aerial search of the area produced no results. Based on this information, Hestle was declared missing in action.

In January 1995, during the 33rd Joint Field Activity (JFA), a joint U.S./Socialist Republic of Vietnam (S.R.V.) team excavated an F-105 crash site near Binh Son Village. Several pieces of life support equipment were recovered, but no remains were recovered.

On April 15, 2015, a Joint Forensic Review (JFR) team received possible human remains recovered by a Vietnamese national who was farming in the area in 1996. The remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Hestle’s remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), which matched his brother, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 6, 2018

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Frank Wood, 25,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Frank Wood, 25, of Jackson, Ohio, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be buried April 14 in Franklin, North Carolina. On Dec. 7, 1941, Wood was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wood. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Wood.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.
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To identify Wood’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which matched his records.

 

 

 

 

 

Air force Pilot  From Vietnam War Accounted For
April 6, 2018

Air Force Col. Peter J. Stewart, 44

Air Force Col. Peter J. Stewart, 44, Winter Haven Fl. missing from the Vietnam War, has now been accounted for.

On March 15, 1966, Stewart, a member of Headquarters, 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, was the pilot of a two-seater F-4C aircraft, the second in a flight of two on an armed reconnaissance mission over northern Vietnam. The lead aircraft spotted two vehicles as the flight approached the target area and Stewart responded he was going to strafe the trucks. The lead aircraft, while maneuvering to engage the targets, lost sight of Stewart’s aircraft, but saw a bright orange explosion over the trucks. The flight lead immediately attempted to contact Stewart’s aircraft without result. No parachutes or emergency signals were seen, and all subsequent attempts to contact Stewart and his aircraft commander were unsuccessful. An organized search was not possible due to hostilities in the area. Stewart was subsequently declared missing in action. His status was later amended to deceased.

In June 2017, DPAA identified the remains of the aircraft commander, Col. Martin R. Scott.

The support from the government and the people of Vietnam was vital to the success of this recovery.

Stewart’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Soldier From Vietnam War Accounted For
April 6, 2018

Army Staff Sgt. Marshall F. Kipina, 21

Army Staff Sgt. Marshall F. Kipina, 21, Calumet MI went missing from the Vietnam War, has now been accounted for. 

On July 13, 1966 Kipina was assigned to the 131st Aviation Company, serving as an observer aboard an OV-1C aircraft, on a night surveillance mission from Phu Bai Airfield over Attapu Province, Laos People’s Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.). Visibility was poor due to heavy thunderstorms. Radar and radio contact were lost with the aircraft, which was not uncommon due to the mountainous terrain in that part of Laos. When the aircraft did not return as scheduled, search efforts were initiated, but no crash site was found. 

At 2300 hours on 13 July 1966, Capt. Robert G. Nopp, pilot, and then PFC Marshall Kipina, observer/airborne sensor operator; comprised the crew of an OV1C aircraft (serial #612675), call sign "Iron Spud." The Mohawk departed Phu Bai Airbase on a classified single aircraft night surveillance mission over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. The mission identifiers for these types of reconnaissance missions were "Steel Tiger" and "Tiger Hound." Prior to take off, all radios, navigational aids and altitude instruments were reported functioning properly. It was carrying 4 ½ hours of fuel for its 2 ½ hour mission. Weather conditions in the area were moderate thunderstorms, heavy rain and poor visibility.

This area of extreme south-eastern Laos was considered a major artery of the infamous Ho Chi Minh Trail. When North Vietnam began to increase its military strength in South Vietnam, NVA and Viet Cong troops again intruded on neutral Laos for sanctuary, as the Viet Minh had done during the war with the French some years before. This border road was used by the Communists to transport weapons, supplies and troops from North Vietnam into South Vietnam, and was frequently no more than a path cut through the jungle covered mountains. US forces used all assets available to them to stop this flow of men and supplies from moving south into the war zone.

The last known voice and radar contact with the Mohawk was made at 2314 hours on 13 July. At that time there was no indication of trouble. Loosing radar contact with aircraft in this region of Laos was quite common due to the mountainous terrain. Later when it was determined the aircraft was overdue, a ramp check of all airfields to which Capt. Nopp could have diverted were contacted, but none could provide any information about the missing Mohawk.

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of Laos for their assistance in accounting for Kipina.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Kipina's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for. 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing in Korean War Accounted For
April 6, 2018

Army Master Sgt. George R. Housekeeper, Jr., 28,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Master Sgt. George R. Housekeeper, Jr., 28, of Lansdale, Pennsylvania, accounted for on June 15, 2017, will be buried April 11, in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. In late November 1950, Housekeeper was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. The American forces withdrew south with the Chinese attacks continuing. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory. Because Housekeeper could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950. 

Housekeeper’s name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning American prisoners reported Housekeeper as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

In September 2004, a joint U.S. and Korean People’s Army (KPA) recovery team conducted a 
Joint Recovery Operation at a burial site in the vicinity of Twikkae Village, Changjin District, South Hamgyong Province, North Korea, on the east side of the Chosin Reservoir. The site was consistent with the 31st RCT’s location during its withdrawal. During the excavation, the recovery team recovered material evidence and several sets of osseous material. The remains were sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Housekeeper’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his brother, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing in Korean War Accounted For
April 4, 2018

Army Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan

Army Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan, missing from the Korean War, was accounted for on March 30, 2018.

In August 1950, Reagan was assigned to Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, participating in the defense of the 24th ID’s main supply route and the town of Yongsan in an area known as the Naktong Bulge, in South Korea. Reagan’s company, an engineer unit, was overwhelmed and outmaneuvered by the Korean People’s Army, and utilized as an infantry unit in an attempt to hold open the supply route. On Aug. 12, 1950, the company was able to withdraw to a safe area to account for their Soldiers. Reagan could not be accounted for and was declared missing in action.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Reagan's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
April 2, 2018

Marine Corps Pvt. Edwin W. Jordan, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Pvt. Edwin W. Jordan, 19, of Pittsburgh, and accounted for on Sept. 27, 2017, will be buried April 9, in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. In November 1943, Jordan was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Jordan died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Jordan’s remains were not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review board declared Jordan’s remains non-recoverable.

In July 2017, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA used advanced investigative techniques to locate further areas believed to contain the remains of men buried on Tarawa. The recovered remains were sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Jordan’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 2, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young, 23

Navy Seaman 1st Class Robert V. Young, 23, McDonough County, Illinois,  was killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Young was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Young.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Young's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 2, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz, 26

Navy Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz, 26, Almena, Wisconsin, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Bruesewitz was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Bruesewitz .

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Bruesewitz' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed in Korean War Accounted For
April 2, 2018

Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker,

Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for.

In September 1950, Baker was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Sept. 6, 1950, as a result of fighting that occurred between his unit and enemy forces near Haman, South Korea.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Baker's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 2, 2018

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Bernard V. Doyle, Fort Wayne, Indiana killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Doyle was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Doyle.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Doyle's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 2, 2018

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews,

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews, 25, Luverne, Crenshaw County, Alabama killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On May 29, 2943, Mathews was a member of the 422nd Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force, participating in a strike against the German submarine base at Saint-Nazaire, France. The B-17 Mathews was aboard was hit by enemy fire as it left the target area. Mathews did not make it out of the bomber before it crashed. Survivors believed the aircraft crashed approximately 150 kilometers from Saint-Nazaire, near the French village of Quintin. German reports indicated one casualty was recovered from the wreckage of the plane, though no burial information was provided.

DPAA is grateful to the French government and the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Mathews’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Cambridge American Cemetery in the United Kingdom, an American Battle Monuments Commission site. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
April 2, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley,

Navy Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Foley, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Foley was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Foley.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Foley's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
March 27, 2018

2nd Class Ora H. Sharninghouse, Jr., 22

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Reserve Aviation Ordnance man 2nd Class Ora H. Sharninghouse, Jr., 22, of McComb, Ohio, accounted for on Aug. 10, 2017, will be buried April 7 in Findlay, Ohio. On Sept. 8, 1944, Sharninghouse was a member of the Navy Torpedo Squadron Eighteen (VT-18), USS Intrepid, on a bombing mission against Japanese positions on Babelthuap Island, Palau. As the aircraft reached the target area, the pilot began a dive near Bokerugeru Point and the crew released its 2,000-pound bomb. While attempting to pull out of the dive, the bomb hit an ammunition dump and exploded. The explosion tore the tail from the aircraft, causing it to crash off-shore. Sharninghouse was reported missing in action.

After combat operations in the area ceased, the American Graves Registration Service- Philippine Command travelled to Palau to investigate and attempt to recover missing service members. No record of the crash site was found.

In 2005, BentProp Project, a nonprofit NGO of volunteers who work with DPAA in the Republic of Palau, located a piece of the starboard wing of an aircraft near Bokerugeru Point. Subsequent investigations located the main body of the aircraft offshore.

In 2014, subsequent investigations by Project Recover team members located the main body of the aircraft offshore and possible human remains were located within the main body of the aircraft, and sent to the Central Identification Laboratory for analysis.

In April 2015, a DPAA Underwater Recovery Team excavated the site and recovered additional remains and material evidence.

To identify Sharninghouse’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family; anthropological analysis, which matched his records; and historical evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 27, 2018

Marine Corps Pfc. Lyle E. Charpilloz, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Pfc. Lyle E. Charpilloz, 19, of Silverton, Oregon, accounted for on Sept. 27, 2017, will be buried April 7, in Salem, Oregon. In November 1943, Charpilloz was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Charpilloz died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Charpilloz’ remains were not recovered. On Feb. 10, 1949, a military review board declared Charpilloz’ remains non-recoverable.

In May 2014, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA received remains from a site where Charpilloz was believed to have been buried. The recovered remains were sent to the laboratory for analysis.

On Oct. 17, 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-5 from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, and submitted the remains for analysis. Based on consistent recovery context and shared DNA, the remains were consolidated with those accessioned in 2014.

To identify Charpilloz’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), which matched his family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 27, 2018

Marine Corps Pvt. John M. Tillman, 21,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Pvt. John M. Tillman, 21, of Reno, Nevada, accounted for on Sept. 5, 2017, will be buried April 6, in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. In November 1943, Tillman was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Tillman died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Tillman’s remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification in 1947. By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP) in Honolulu.

On March 13, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-35 from the NMCP and sent the remains to DPAA for analysis.

To identify Tillman’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For
March 27, 2018

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. William H. Harth, Jr., 22

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. William H. Harth, Jr., 22, of Columbia, South Carolina, accounted for on Nov. 3, 2017, will be buried April 6 in his hometown. In the summer of 1943, Harth was a bombardier assigned to the 329th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), which was known as “The Traveling Circus.” On Aug. 1, 1943, he served on a B-24D aircraft, nicknamed “Hell’s Angels,” when he was participating in a historic mission, code-named Operation TIDAL WAVE, which was the first large-scale, low-altitude attack by U.S. heavy bomber aircraft on Ploesti, Romania. As Harth’s aircraft approached Ploesti, it was hit by German anti-aircraft fire. He was declared missing in action when his aircraft failed to return following the mission. 

In the days following the bombing raid, Romanian officials and civilians recovered and interred the remains of the deceased American Airmen in the Hero Section of the Bolovan Cemetery.

In 1946 and 1947, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) teams disinterred the remains of Americans killed in the raid, and reinterred them in the American Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium (now known as Ardennes American Cemetery). The AGRC was able to identify 145 Airmen killed during Operation TIDAL WAVE, including three of Harth’s crewmates, however he was listed as non-recoverable. One set of unidentified remains was listed as Unknown X-5192 Neuville.

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that X-5192 could likely be identified. After receiving approval, on April 11, 2017, Unknown X-5192 was disinterred from Neuville and sent to DPAA for analysis.

To identify Harth’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence

 

 

 

 

 

Airman From Vietnam War Accounted For
March 27, 2018

Air Force Col. Edgar F. Davis, 32

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted for from the Vietnam War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Air Force Col. Edgar F. Davis, 32, of Goldsboro, North Carolina, accounted for on Dec. 19, 2017, will be buried April 6 in his hometown. On Sept. 17, 1968, Davis was a navigator aboard a RF-4C Phantom fighter-bomber aircraft, assigned to the 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing. Davis and his pilot were on a night photo-reconnaissance mission over the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) when they were shot down by anti-aircraft artillery fire. The pilot ejected out of the aircraft and was rescued, however no contact could be established with Davis. Because of this, he was declared missing in action. Search and rescue efforts were suspended after failing to locate Davis or the aircraft wreckage. Davis was later declared deceased.

Between August 2001 and February 2015, joint U.S./L.P.D.R. teams investigated a crash site six times that correlated with Davis’ loss. Excavations recovered personal effects, but analysis could not confirm whether Davis was in the aircraft at the time of the crash. A subsequent team excavated an ejection seat location associated with the crash.

In 2015, a Stony Beach debriefer in Bangkok, Thailand obtained information from a villager concerning the burial location of a U.S. service member in Boulapha District, Khammouan Province, L.P.D.R. The villager claimed that in 1968, his father came across the remains of a U.S. pilot and buried them near his house. The villager turned over bone fragments, which were sent to DPAA for analysis. 

To identify Davis’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as material and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed in Korean War Accounted For
March 27, 2018

Army Cpl. Roy J. Hopper, 21,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently-accounted for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Roy J. Hopper, 21, of Miami, accounted for on June 23, 2017, will be buried April 6 in Dayton, Ohio. In July 1950, Hopper was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion 19th Infantry Regiment. He was reportedly killed in action on July 31, 1950, when his battalion, along with another battalion, was engaged in a fighting withdrawal against North Korean forces in Chinju, South Korea. The enemy had control of the area following the battle, preventing a search for his remains. After the battle Hopper’s remains were not identified. 

In early 1951, the graves at Masan cemetery were exhumed and the unknowns were transferred to the U.S. Army’s Central Identification unit in Kokura, Japan. Remains that could not be identified were transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, including “Unknown X-119.”

After thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that X-119 could likely be identified. After receiving approval, X-119 was disinterred on Jan. 9, 2017 and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Hopper’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his brother and sister, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
March 27, 2018

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater, 19

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater, 19, San Francisco County, California, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Goldwater was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Goldwater.

"Jack was not meant to be on duty that day but had taken a friend’s shift."

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Goldwater's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing in Korean War Accounted For
March 26, 2018

Army Cpl. William C. McDowell, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. William C. McDowell, 20, of Stuttgart, Arkansas, accounted for on January 10, will be buried April 4 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. In late November, 1950, McDowell was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because McDowell could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

McDowell’s name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning Americans reported McDowell as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of March 15, 1954.

On Dec. 1, 1994, North Korea unilaterally turned over 33 boxes of remains, which were purportedly recovered from Hwangcho-ri, Changjin County, South Hamgyong Province, North Korea. The remains were accessioned to the Central Identification Laboratory, a predecessor to DPAA, in Hawaii.

To identify McDowell’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
March 23, 2018

Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Porter L. Rich, 27,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Water Tender 2nd Class Porter L. Rich, 27, of Lake Preston, South Dakota, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be buried March 31 in his hometown. On Dec. 7, 1941, Rich was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Rich. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Rich.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Rich’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis, which matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which matched his records.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Soldier in Korean War Accounted For
March 23, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon, 34,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon, 34, of Grindstone, Pennsylvania, accounted for on Jan. 11, 2018, will be buried March 31 in Northfield, Ohio. In September 1950, Simon was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in a defense of the Pusan Perimeter, a large defensive line west and north of Pusan, South Korea. Simon was reported to have been killed in action Sept. 5, 1950, but his remains were not located following the battle. 

In May 1951, American Graves Registration Service personnel recovered three sets of remains after a villager notified them of remains near his village on Hill 762. The remains were sent to the Tanggok United Nations Military Cemetery. One set of remains, identified as Unknown X-1085 Tanggok, were later transferred to the Central Identification Unit-Kokura for possible identification. However, an identification could not be established and the remains were declared unidentifiable and interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In October 2017, based on research and analysis, DPAA disinterred Unknown X-1085 from the Punchbowl and accessioned the remains to the laboratory for identification.

To identify Simon’s remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory analysis, including anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence.

DPAA is grateful to the South Korean government and the Department of Veterans Affairs for their assistance in this recovery.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 23
, 2018

Army Air Forces Capt. George Van Vleet, 34

Army Air Forces Capt. George Van Vleet, 34, Fresno County, California, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Jan. 21, 1944, Van Vleet was a member of the 38th Bombardment Squadron, (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group, stationed at Hawkins Field, Helen Island, Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, when the B-24J bomber aircraft he was a passenger on crashed shortly after take-off. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Republic Kiribati of for their partnerships in this mission.

Van Vleet’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, site along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captured Soldier in Korean War Accounted For
March 22, 2018

Army Cpl. Thomas H. Mullins, 18,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Thomas H. Mullins, 18, of Harriman, Tennessee, accounted for on June 8, 2017, will be buried March 29 in St. Petersburg, Florida. On Nov. 2, 1950, Mullins was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 2, 1950, following combat between the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) and his regiment, in the vicinity of Unsan, North Korea. Approximately 600 men were killed, captured or missing from his battalion. Mullins was subsequently declared missing in action. 

At the end of the war, during “Operation Big Switch,” where all remaining prisoners of war were returned, former prisoners were interviewed. One reported that Mullins died while being held in POW Camp 5, Pyokdong, North Korea.

On Dec. 14, 1993, North Korea unilaterally turned over 33 boxes containing remains believed to be unaccounted for Americans from the Korean War. The remains were reportedly recovered from Tongju-ri, Pyokdong County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea, which was the known location of POW Camp 5.

To identify Mullins’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched two cousins, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 22
, 2018

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Frank A. Fazekas, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Frank A. Fazekas, 22, of Trenton, New Jersey, accounted for on Aug. 7, 2017, will be buried March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On May 27, 1944, Fazekas was a member of the 22nd Fighter Squadron, 36th Fighter Group, when he was returning from a mission over northern France and his P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft came under enemy fire. His aircraft crashed in a field north of the French village of Buysscheure. His remains were not recovered and the U.S. Army reported him deceased on May 27, 1944.

In July 1946, a British recovery team investigated a crash site associated with Fazekas’ loss. The team recovered aircraft parts and personal effects, but his remains were not recovered. Based on this information, a Board of Officers of the American Graves Registration Command declared his remains unrecoverable.

On July 16, 2012, a team of historians and an anthropologist from the Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office and Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (both predecessors to DPAA) visited the crash site. The team received assistance from local residents and officials, as well as research from Mr. Joss Leclercq, a French historian. In August 2016, a team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, augmented by DPAA, excavated the crash site, recovering possible remains. The remains were sent to DPAA on August 31, 2016.

To identify Fazekas’ remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
March 19, 2018

Navy Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland, 22

Navy Fireman 1st Class Jarvis G. Outland, 22, North Carolina,  killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Outland was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Outland.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Outland's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

Airman From Vietnam War Accounted For
March 19, 2018

Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Donald J. Hall, 29,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Donald J. Hall, 29, of Stroud, Oklahoma, will be buried March 26 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On Feb. 6, 1967, Hall was a member of Detachment 5, 38th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, when he, along with three other service members, were flying an HH-3E helicopter on a rescue and recovery mission over northern Vietnam. After rescuing the pilot of a downed aircraft, Hall’s helicopter was hit by enemy ground fire, resulting in an internal explosion and crash. Hall was subsequently reported missing in action. His status was later amended to deceased. 

In March 2017, a Vietnamese Office for Seeking Missing Persons (VNOSMP) team excavated a crash site associated with Hall’s loss, near Bai Dinh Hamlet, Dan Hoa Village, Quang Binh Province, Vietnam, and recovered possible osseous remains and material evidence. On March 31, 2017, a Joint Forensic Review team examined the possible remains in Da Nang and recommended them for repatriation to the United States. The remains were sent to DPAA on April 2, 2017.

To identify Hall’s remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

The support from the government of Vietnam was vital to the success of this recovery.

Today there are 1,600 American servicemen and civilians who are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. Hall’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 16
, 2018

Army Pvt. Rudolph Johnson, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, unaccounted for since World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pvt. Rudolph Johnson, 20, of Malvern, Arkansas, will be buried March 23 in Little Rock, Arkansas. In February 1945, Johnson was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 365th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division. In an era of racial segregation, the 92nd ID was the only African-American division to fight in Europe. The unit fought on the western most portion of the Gothic Line in northern Italy. Its zone of operations consisted of two contiguous sectors; one sector along the Ligurian Sea coastline and the other in the Serchio River Valley. As part of Operation Fourth Term, Johnson’s regiment fought for days to secure positions along the Lama di Sotto ridge against strong German counterattacks. Johnson was reported missing in action as of Feb. 6, 1945. The War Department changed his status to killed in action on Feb. 21. 1945.

On May 9, 1947, American Graves Registration Service personnel recovered a set of remains designated as “Unknown X-298” in the vicinity of Lama di Sotto, Italy. They recovered a second set of remains in the same investigation and identified them as another member of Johnson’s regiment. Unknown X-298 could not be identified and was buried at the United States Military Cemetery at Castelfiorentino, Italy on May 14, 1947. 

On Sept. 17, 1948, the American Graves Registration Services personnel disinterred Unknown X-298 and tried unsuccessfully to make an identification. The remains were reinterred in the USMC Florence American Cemetery on Dec. 16, 1949.

Researchers at DPAA conducted a thorough historical and scientific analysis, and determined that X-298 could likely be identified. After receiving approval, on June 13, 2016, X-298 was disinterred and sent to DPAA for analysis.

To identify Johnson’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and historical evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 15
, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Manuel Menendez, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Manuel Menendez, 20, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, will be buried March 22 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. In November 1943, Menendez was assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Menendez died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Menendez’ remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification in 1947. By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In October 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-168 from the NMCP and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Menendez’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis, which matched his family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing in Korean War Accounted For
March 15, 2018

Army Sgt. Julius E. McKinney,

Army Sgt. Julius E. McKinney, Clay, Ak. missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for.

In late November 1950, McKinney was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. McKinney was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after he was last seen on the east side of the Chosin Reservoir.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

McKinney’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing From World War II Accounted For
March 15
, 2018

Army Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz, 28

 

Army Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz, 28, Long Beach, Ca.  killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

In September 1944, Rosenkrantz was a member of Company H, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, participating in Operation Market Garden, a ploy by Allied planners to break German defensive lines on the western front by capturing a highway route through the Netherlands. On Sept. 28, 1944, Rosenkrantz’ platoon occupied Heuvelhof, a farm, located south of the town of Groesbeek. German tanks and infantry launched a major attack that morning. The isolated paratroopers hid among sparse trees and buildings. As Rosenkrantz rose from his position, enemy gunfire erupted and Rosenkrantz was killed. Due to enemy fire and the proximity to enemy troops, Rosenkrantz’ remains could not be recovered. 

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Overhand, Mr. Van Lunteren, the Royal Netherlands Army’s Recovery and Identification Unit and the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Rosenkrantz’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  in Korean War Accounted For
March 15, 2018

Army Cpl. James I. Jubb, 31

Army Cpl. James I. Jubb, 31, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND was killed during the Korean War, has now been accounted for.

In August 1950, Jubb was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, his unit suffered heavy losses while fighting units of the North Korean People’s Army in the vicinity of the Naktong River, South Korea. Jubb was reported missing in action on Aug. 10, 1950 when he could not be accounted for by his unit. His remains were later declared unrecoverable.

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Jubb’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the NMCP in Honolulu along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Captured  in Korean War Accounted For
March 9, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Harry E. Harkness, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Harry E. Harkness, 22, of Lansing, Michigan, will be buried March 17 in his hometown. On In November 1950, Harkness was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions against the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of Unsan, North Korea. Harkness was reported missing in action as of Nov. 2, 1950 when he could not be accounted for by his unit.

Following the war, during an operation known as “Operation Big Switch,” when prisoners of war were returned, returning Americans from Pyoktong Camp 5 reported that Harkness had been captured and died while at POW Camp 5 sometime between January and April 1951.

On Dec. 21, 1993, North Korea unilaterally turned over 34 boxes containing remains reportedly to be unaccounted-for U.S. servicemen from the Korean War. One set of remains came from Tongju-ri, Pyokdong County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea, which corresponds to the known location of POW Camp 5, where Harkness was believed to have died.

To identify Harkness’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis which matched his records; and circumstantial evidence

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 9
, 2018

Marine Corps Pvt. George F. Patrick, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Pvt. George F. Patrick, 22, of Dallas, will be buried March 17 in his hometown. In November 1943, Patrick was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Patrick died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Patrick’s remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification in 1947. By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In March 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-100 from the NMCP and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Patrick’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 8
, 2018

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William W. Shank, 24

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William W. Shank, 24, HARRISONBURG, Va. killed During World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Nov. 13, 1943, Shank was a pilot with the 338th Fighter Squadron, 55th Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force, flying his P-38 on a mission to Bremen, Germany.
Shanks’s Army squadron was protecting allied bombers over Bremen, in northern Germany, when it encountered 40 to 50 enemy aircraft
. Shank was killed after engaging in fierce enemy action.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Oeltjebruns and the American Battle Monuments Commission for their assistance with this disinterment and recovery.

Shank’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Cambridge American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission in the United Kingdom, along with the others missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
March 7, 2018

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer,

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Howard V. Keffer, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Keffer was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Keffer.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Keffer's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
March 7
, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, 22

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, 22, Laurens CountySouth Carolina, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On May 30, 1945, Mulligan was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division, engaged in heavy fighting against Japanese forces on Hill 27, on the northern bank of the Kokuba Estuary, Okinawa, Japan. A large crypt loaded with ammunition exploded, wounding dozens and killing Mulligan.

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Mulligan’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Captured  in Korean War Accounted For
February  28, 2018

Army Pfc. Leroy W. Bryant, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. Leroy W. Bryant, 22, of Autreyville, Georgia, will be buried March 9, in Columbus, Ohio. In early February 1951, Bryant was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, as U.S. Republic of Korea Army (ROKA) and United Nations Command (UNC) forces were deployed in defensive positions across the South Korean peninsula. On February 6, Bryant’s regiment was located in the town of Yonghyon-ni, and was tasked to determine location, position and strength of enemy forces. Enemy forces attacked, forcing them to withdraw to new positions. Because Bryant could not be accounted for by his unit after the attack, he was reported missing action as of Feb. 6, 1951, near Yanghyon-ni, South Korea.

Throughout the war, the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) and Korean People’s Army (KPA) provided lists of American servicemen held in their custody. Bryant’s name appeared on a list of Americans who died while in custody of communist forces, informally known as the “Christmas List.” However, there was no way to confirm this report and Bryant’s status remained listed as missing in action.

Following the war, a returning prisoner from Bryant’s regiment reported that friends told him Bryant died while being marched north to prisoner of war Camp 1, located along the Yalu River, near the village of Changsong. Based on this information, the U.S. Army amended his status to deceased.

From August to November 1954, the United Nations, Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) and North Korea exchanged war dead at Munsan-ni, South Korea. On Sept. 7, 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from a prisoner of war cemetery at Camp 1 and 3, Changsong, North Korea, were sent to the Central Identification Unit in Kokura, Japan, for attempted identification. The set of remains was designated “X-14155” and was transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu and interred as a Korean War Unknown. 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that X-14155 could likely be identified. After receiving approval, X-14155 was disinterred on Jan. 9, 2017, and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Bryant’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

Missing Soldier From Vietnam War Accounted For
February  26, 2018

Army Lt. Col. Robert G. Nopp, 32

Army Lt. Col. Robert G. Nopp, 32, Marion County, OR was missing from the Vietnam War, has now been accounted for. 

On July 13, 1966 Nopp was assigned to the 131st Aviation Company, serving as a pilot aboard an OV-1C aircraft, on a night surveillance mission from Phu Bai Airfield over Attapu Province, Laos People’s Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.). Visibility was poor due to heavy thunderstorms. Radar and radio contact were lost with the aircraft, which was not uncommon due to the mountainous terrain in that part of Laos. When the aircraft did not return as scheduled, search efforts were initiated, but no crash site was found. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services. 

DPAA is grateful to the government of Laos for their assistance in accounting for Nopp.

Nopp’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  26, 2018

Navy Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson,

Navy Electrician's Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gibson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Gibson.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Gibson's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed in Korean War Accounted For
February  23, 2018

Army Pfc. Lamar E. Newman, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. Lamar E. Newman, 19, of Griffin, Georgia, will be buried March 2 in his hometown. In November 1950, Newman was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, taking part in a defensive operation in the vicinity of the village of Kujang, North Korea. The Division suffered heavy losses, with many Soldiers going missing or being killed or captured. Newman went missing near the village of Kujang as a result of heavy fighting on Nov. 27, 1950.

Throughout the remainder of the war, no lists provided by the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) or Korean People’s Army (KPA) listed Newman as a prisoner of war. Additionally, no returning prisoners of war had any information regarding Newman’s status. Following the war, during Operation Glory, the CPVF and KPA returned the remains of more than 2,900 Americans, however no remains were associated with Newman and the U.S. Army declared him non-recoverable on Jan. 16, 1956.

In October 2000, possible human remains from a site south of Unsan were recovered by a U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory (a predecessor to DPAA)/KPA Recovery Team. The remains were determined to have been found in a secondary burial site and were subsequently accessioned into the Central Identification Laboratory (now the DPAA laboratory) in Hawaii for identification.

To identify Newman’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
February  23, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Arnold J. Harrison, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Arnold J. Harrison, 19, of Detroit, Michigan, will be buried March 2, in Dallas, Texas. In November 1943, Harrison was assigned to Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Harrison died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Harrison’s remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification in 1947. By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

On Jan. 30, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-166 from the Punchbowl and submitted the remains for analysis.

To identify Harrison’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed From World War II Accounted For
February  22, 2018

Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak, 21

Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak, 21, Mclennan County, Texas was killed during World War II, has now been accounted for. 

In January 1945, Husak was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division, serving in the European theater. Husak was killed during a combat patrol on Jan. 30, 1945 in Germany’s Hürtgen Forest. The offensive in the forest was one of the longest battles the United States fought during World War II, lasting for nearly five months. 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Husak’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing, the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Hombourg, Belgium. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 Soldier Killed in Korean War Accounted For
February  22, 2018

Army Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile

Army Cpl. Leonard V. Purkapile, Grant, Wi,   was killed during the Korean War, has now been accounted for.

In late November 1950, Purkapile was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of Unsan, while withdrawing southeast to Yongbyon, North Korea. Following the battle, Purkapile could not be accounted for and he was reported as missing in action on Nov. 28, 1950. By the end of the war, his status was changed to deceased and his remains deemed non-recoverable.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services. 

Purkapile's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
February  22, 2018

Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore,

Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Harvel L. Moore, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for. 

In November 1943, Moore was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Moore died on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more information will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Moore's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  22, 2018

Navy Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lorentz E. Hultgren,

Navy Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lorentz E. Hultgren, Tacoma, WA killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hultgren was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Hultgren.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Hultgren's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
February  21, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Joe Lukie,

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Joe Lukie, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Lukie was assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Lukie died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more information will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Lukie's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  21, 2018

Navy Gunner's Mate 2nd Class William F. Hellstern, 21

Navy Gunner's Mate 2nd Class William F. Hellstern, 21, Peoria County Illinois, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hellstern was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Hellstern.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Hellstern's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  21, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton,

Navy Seaman 1st Class Henry G. Tipton, Clark Ridge, Ark. killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tipton was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Tipton.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Tipton's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  15, 2018

Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn, 43

Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn, 43, Lonaconing, Maryland.  killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Glenn was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Glenn.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Glenn's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Captured Soldier Killed in Korean War Accounted For
February  9, 2018

Army Pfc. David Baker,

Army Pfc. David Baker, captured during the Korean War, has now been accounted for. 

In late November 1950, Baker was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, positioned in the vicinity of Yongbyong, North Korea. Baker’s battalion moved north and lost contact with two other regiments. On Nov. 25, 1950, 3rd BN met with enemy resistance and was attacked by Chinese People’s Volunteer Force. The battalion suffered heavy casualties and Baker was declared missing in action as of Nov. 28, 1950, when he could not be accounted for by his unit. Later reports indicate that Baker was likely captured by the enemy during battle. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services. 

Baker’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  9, 2018

Navy Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong

Navy Molder 1st Class Kenneth B. Armstrong, National City, California, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Armstrong was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Armstrong.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Armstrong's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Captured Soldier Killed in Korean War Accounted For
February  5, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Alfred G. Bensinger, Jr.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently identified after being captured and killed during the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Alfred G. Bensinger, Jr., of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, will be buried February 16 in the Fort Sill National Cemetery, Fort Sill, Oklahoma. In late November 1950, Bensinger was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion (2nd ECB) 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting persistent Chinese attacks in the Ch’ongch’on River area in northwestern North Korea. The battle began on the evening of Nov. 25, 1950, when the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces initiated their Second Phase offensive along the entire 8th Army front. Bensinger’s battalion was heavily engaged in the battle. When withdrawal orders were issued on November 29, the 2nd ECB provided security for the Division.
The following day, the battalion was ordered to withdraw from the vicinity of Kunu-ri, when it was again engaged by enemy forces down the Main Supply Route. During this withdrawal, Bensinger was captured. 


Several returning American POWs reported that Bensinger died at the prisoner of war transient camp known as the Hofong Camp, a sub-camp of the Pukchin-Tarigol Main Camp Cluster in mid-January 1951.

In April 2005, a DPAA/Korean People’s Army Recovery Team recovered remains from a site south of Unsan. The remains included 32 different individuals, and appeared to have originated from a previous burial site. The remains were then sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Bensinger’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  8, 2018

Navy Fireman 1st Class Charles R. Ogle, 20

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted for from World War II are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Fireman 1st Class Charles R. Ogle, 20, of Mountain View, Missouri, will be buried February 12 in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri. On Dec. 7, 1941, Ogle was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Ogle. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Ogle.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Ogle’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  2, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx, 23

Navy Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx, 23, Mitchell, IA killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Arickx was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Arickx.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Arickx's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  2, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker, 20

Navy Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker, 20, Oklahoma, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Wicker was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wicker.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Wicker's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
February  1, 2018

Navy Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller, 20

Navy Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller, 20, Glenrose, Noble, Oklahoma  killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Geller was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Geller.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Geller's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
February  1, 2018

Marine Corps Pfc. Jack H. Krieger, 27

Marine Corps Pfc. Jack H. Krieger, 27, from Missouri, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Krieger was assigned to Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Krieger died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., and the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission. 

Interment services are pending; more information will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Krieger's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Tulsamerican Airman Killed in World War II Accounted For
January  31, 2018

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Eugene P. Ford,

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Eugene P. Ford, Pennsylvania, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 17, 1944, Ford was the a member of the 765th Bombardment Squadron, 461st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force, as the pilot of a B-24J aircraft known as The Tulsamerican. Accompanied by a crew of nine service members, the Tulsamerican was the lead aircraft in a group of six B-24s from the squadron to participate in a combat bombing mission targeting oil refineries at Odertal, Germany. Coming out of a cloud bank near the target, the aircraft were attacked by more than 40 German Me-109 and FW-190 fighters. The unit suffered heavy losses with three of their six aircraft shot down and the other three damaged. The Tulsamerican sustained heavy damage, forcing Ford to abort the mission and crash land in the Adriatic Sea, near the Isle of Vis, in present-day Croatia. Seven crewmembers of the aircraft survived and were rescued, however three, including Ford, were killed in the crash, and their bodies were unable to be recovered.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is grateful to the divers who discovered the crash site, the Croatian Government, the Croatian Conservation Institute, Lund University, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, the National Park Service and the Croatian Navy for their partnership in this mission.

Ford's name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery in Italy, an American Battle Monuments Commission site.
 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing in Korean War Accounted For
January  31, 2018

Army Sgt. Ollie E. Shepard, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. Ollie E. Shepard, 22, of Hugo, Oklahoma, will be buried February 7 in the Bradley, Oklahoma. In late November, 1950, Shepard was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. The American forces withdrew south with the Chinese attacks continuing. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because Shepard could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 3, 1950.

Shepard’s name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated Americans reported Shepard as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on Dec. 31, 1953.

In September 2004, a joint U.S. and Korean People’s Army (KPA) recovery team conducted a Joint Recovery Operation at a burial site in the vicinity of Twikkae Village, Changjin District, South Hamgyong Province, North Korea, on the east side of the Chosin Reservoir. The site is consistent with the 31st RCT’s location during their withdrawal. Material evidence and human remains were recovered and sent to DPAA for analysis.

To identify Shepard’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
January  29, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Donald G. Keller,

Navy Seaman 1st Class Donald G. Keller, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Keller was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Keller.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Keller's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed in Korean War Accounted For
January  23, 2018

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Richard G. Cushman, 18,

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Richard G. Cushman, 18, of Springville, Utah, will be buried February 3, in Cypress, California. In late November 1950, Cushman was assigned to Company A, 72nd Medium tank Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, on the western side of the Korean Peninsula, when the Division encountered waves of attacks by the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF.) The attack caused the Division to withdraw to the village of Kunu-ri. While in the village, a task force comprised of Cushman’s company and an infantry platoon were ordered to destroy a roadblock and eliminate enemy troops. The CPVF overwhelmingly attacked the unit and by the end of battle, Cushman could not be accounted for. He was reported missing in action as of Dec. 5, 1950.

Following the war, no lists provided by the CPVF or Korean People’s Army (KPA) listed Cushman as a prisoner of war, however two returning American prisoners reported that Cushman had died while being held by the CPVF. Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of March 31, 1951.

In July and August 2002, a joint U.S. and KPA recovery team conducted a Joint Recovery Operation at a site, designated KN-0874, in Ung Bong Village, North Korea. Based on information provided by Korean witnesses, Mr. Man Hyon Ho, and Mr. Anh Il Chang, the site was excavated and possible human remains were recovered, along with personal effects and material evidence, all of which was sent to the DPAA laboratory for processing.

To identify Cushman’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence, which matched his records.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed in World War II Accounted For
January  26, 2018

 

Army Pfc. Lloyd J. Lobdell, 23,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that a U.S. serviceman, missing from World War II, has been identified and is being returned to his family for burial with full military honors. 

Army Pfc. Lloyd J. Lobdell, 23, of Elkhorn, Wisconsin, will be buried February 2, in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. On Dec. 8, 1941, Lobdell was a member of Company A, 192nd Tank Battalion, in the Far East, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands. Intense fighting continued until May 6. 1942, when American forces on Corregidor Island surrendered.

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner; including many who were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to Japanese prisoner of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan on the island of Luzon, Philippines. Lobdell was among those reported captured after the surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to the Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the remaining years of the war. 

Lobdell was admitted to the Cabanatuan Prison Camp Hospital suffering from illness. He died Nov. 19, 1942, and was buried along with fellow prisoners in the local Cabanatuan camp cemetery. 

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to a temporary U.S. military cemetery near Manila. In late 1947, the AGRS again exhumed the remains at the Manila cemetery in an attempt to identify them. Due to the circumstances of the POW deaths and burials, the extensive commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of the remains could not be individually identified. The unidentified remains were reburied as unknowns in the American Battle Monuments Commission cemetery at Fort McKinley in Manila, Philippines. 

In 2014, the Secretary of the Army granted permission to exhume ten graves associated with the Cabanatuan Common Grave 717. On August 28, 2014, the remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for identification. 

To identify Lobdell’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which matched his records.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing in Korean War Accounted For
January  23, 2018

Army Pfc. Lamar E. Newman,

Army Pfc. Lamar E. Newman, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for. 

In November 1950, Newman was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, taking part in a defensive
operation in the vicinity of the village of Kujang, North Korea. The Division suffered heavy losses, with many Soldiers going missing or being killed or captured. Newman went missing near the village of Kujang as a
result of heavy fighting on Nov. 27, 1950.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Newman's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War.
 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing in Korean War Accounted For
January  22, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon,

Army Sgt. 1st Class Pete W. Simon, killed during the Korean War, has now been accounted for.

In September 1950, Simon was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in a defense of the Pusan Perimeter, a large defensive line west and north of Pusan, South Korea. Simon was reported to have been killed in action Sept. 5, 1950, but his remains were not located following the battle. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services. 

DPAA is grateful to the South Korean government and the Department of Veterans Affairs for their assistance in this recovery.

Simon’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at an American Battle Monuments Commission site along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman Killed in World War II Accounted For
January  22, 2018

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H. Canty, 23

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H. Canty, 23, Winsted, Connecticut, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On June 22, 1944, Canty was a member of the 555th Bombardment Squadron, 386th Bombardment Group, IX Bomber Command, aboard a B-26 Maurader on a nighttime bombing mission from Easton Lodge-Essex, England, against targets near Caen, France. His B-26 was shot down between the villages of Baron-sur-Odon and Gavrus, France. All eight crewmembers were killed in the incident. Because the location of the crash was in German-held territory, U.S. forces were unable to make a detailed search for the crew at the time of their loss. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is grateful to the French Government, Mr. Michael Jurd and the American Battle Monuments Commission for their assistance in this recovery.

Canty’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Normandy American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
January  22, 2018

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley,

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Valley was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Valley.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Though the men lost on the ship were all in the Navy or the Marines, the Department of Veterans Affairs has authority over the Punchbowl.

“It was one heck of a job to get them to bring them up,” said Bob Valley, 83, whose brother, Fireman 2nd Class Lowell Earl Valley, died on the Oklahoma. “We were fighting everybody — the Navy, the Army, the VA.”

Valley spent years pushing officials to bring up just a few caskets he thought contained remains that could be identified easily, even though he didn’t think his brother was in one of them. The sailor had been in the ship’s engine room, which took the brunt of the attack.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Valley's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
January  22, 2018

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Warren H. Crim, 20

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Warren H. Crim, 20, Bristol, TN. killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Crim was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Crim.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is appreciative to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Crim's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Missing Pilot From Vietnam War Accounted For
January  18, 2018

Air Force Col. Edgar F. Davis, 43

Air Force Col. Edgar F. Davis, 43, Goldsboro, North Carolina,  killed during the Vietnam War, has now been accounted for.

On Sept. 17, 1968, Davis was a navigator aboard a RF-4C Phantom fighter-bomber aircraft, assigned to the 11th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing. Davis and his pilot were on a night photo-reconnaissance mission over the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (L.P.D.R.) when they were shot down by anti-aircraft artillery fire. The pilot ejected out of the aircraft and was rescued, however no contact could be established with Davis. Because of this, he was declared missing in action. Search and rescue efforts were suspended after failing to locate Davis or the aircraft wreckage. Davis was later declared deceased.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is grateful to Stony Beach and the government of Laos for their partnerships in this recovery.

Davis' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
January  18,