RECENTLY FOUND HEROES

 

from ALL PAST WARS

 

 

HONOR THE DEAD BY HELPING THE LIVING”

Today, the DPAA is focused on the research, investigation, recovery, and identification
of the approximately 34,000 (out of approximately 83,000 missing DoD personnel)
believed to be recoverable, who were lost in conflicts from World War II to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

"Returning with Honor"
March 03, 2017

KHAMMOUANE, Laos --

With 1,614 service members missing in action from the Vietnam War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) deploys hundreds of service members,
DoD civilians, and contractors all over the world in hopes of returning our nation’s fallen heroes.

Recently a team of 59 personnel completed DPAA’s second Laos mission of fiscal year 2017, covering the Central East region of Laos. From rice patties to mountainsides,
the teams excavated thousands of square meters of land recovering important evidence relating to missing servicemen lost during the war.

“I’m very honored to have been part of this initiative to bring our missing home,” said U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chris Walgenbach,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “This mission has been the most unique part of my 13 year career in the military and I know others feel the same way.”

Every team member plays an important role in mission success. Whether that is the recovery non-commissioned officer setting up the sites,
or the recovery leader collecting scientific data, working together ensures nothing is overlooked and the safety of the team remains number one priority.

Due to the efforts of the teams, Laos representatives handed over possible remains to the U.S. to be repatriated and welcomed back on American soil after 48 years.
Upon arrival the possible remains will be transported to DPAA’s laboratory for examination and possible identification.

“During this mission I have worked along side some of the greatest men and women I’ve had the pleasure of meeting,
and being chosen for the repatriation ceremony was a perfect way to end such a great mission,” said U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Andrew Brod,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “It is truly an honor to be bringing closure to the families of our fallen service members.”

The hard work and continued dedication of these teams makes it possible for DPAA to fulfill our nations promise and
provide fullest possible accounting for our missing service members to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Ameil Fredeluces, edic, and U.S. Marine Corps. Staff Sgt. Eddie Ludwig, explosive ordinance disposal technician,
remove dirt from units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos,
January 29, 2017.  Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual
reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting
for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency dig units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 26, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing
U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the
fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Jack Kenkeo, life support investigator, shovels dirt from the screening stations during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Francis Sangiamvongse, linguist, screens soil with local villagers during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA
Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 29, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search
of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Lynn Rakos, scientific recovery expert, waters hard soil to help with excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission
in the Khammovan Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

In March of 2017, Making the effort to thank the troops for what they do out in the field means everything.
With a DPAA recovery team in Quang Nam Province, two hours west of Da Nang, Vietnam.

 

 

Disappearance of two Madison airmen in 1953 remains a mystery

The unsolved case called "one of the most enduring mysteries of the Great Lakes"
has been the subject of numerous articles and a film on Canadian television.

The UW-Madison story involved a group of six students and staff members who were part of a team that unearthed a World War II U.S. fighter aircraft—
and possibly remains of its pilot—in the ground under a farm field in France this summer.

The team used ground-penetrating radar and a photo taken by a British reconnaissance plane two days after the May, 1944
crash of the P-47 Thunderbolt flown by 1st Lt. Frank Fazekas.

 

 

 

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II.
Divers of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and Civil Defense of Grado, Italy,
prepare for an exploratory dive on the sunken B-24 bomber. 

This B-24 Liberator is the same type of airplane that
Lakewood, Ohio airman Thomas McGraw was flying in when it was shot down and crashed off the coast of Italy during World War II.

A Missing Air Crew Report details the last flight of the B-24 and nose gunner Thomas McGraw of Lakewood, Ohio.
B-24 located in Adriatic; Crewmanis bones sought Ught Lakewood Manis remains crewman Omber crew,am2-2k-28 bold Header from A1.
 

A skull fragment was recovered at the site of a wrecked B-24 bomber
off the coast of Italy that may contain the remains of
Thomas McGraw, of Lakewood, Ohio.

An underwater view of the crash site of a B-24 off Grado, Italy.

 

 

 

FINDING ENSIGN HAROLD P. DeMOSS IN THE MUCK AND MIRE

“Seeing those photos was so overwhelming that I cried like a baby”
said DeMoss’ niece, Judy Ivey. “To see this actually taking place
is not anything I ever really expected.”

Anine-person military team has been digging up mud four days a week
in the Koolau range in search of a missing World War II pilot whose
fighter crashed in cloud cover during a night training flight.

A bucket-and-pulley system was set up to move excavated
material to a spot where it can be bundled in tarps for
helicopter transport to Wheeler Army Airfield.

NOTE: The Navy’s Bureau of Medicine and Surgery said in a 1948 letter
to the family that “an attempt to recover the remains was
considered impracticable” because the site was 7 miles
from a traveled highway in the mountains.

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb. 25, 1944, Duran wasn’t supposed to be on the doomed B-24H Liberator, nicknamed “Knock it Off.”
Normally a nose turret gunner, Duran was the substitute tail turret gunner on the flight, replacing the usual tail gunner who had frostbite.

 

The earth by the headstone next to the church in this tiny mountain village was full of rocks.

 

Two days of digging under a hot sun had yielded buckets of gravel, stones the size of men’s fists and many piles of dirt – but no bones.
After 73 years, Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran was still missing.

The family feels a sense of closure regardless of the outcome, Duran said.
“What a difference it would have made to my father and to my aunt,”
she said, “to know he had died and somebody had buried him and tended the grave.”

 

 

 

Members of the recovery team attach a POW flag to the wreckage of the
Tulsamerican, a B-24 Liberator piloted by, Lt. Eugene P. Ford, a Derry Township, Pa. native,
when it crashed into the Adriatic Sea in 1944.

 

 


USS Arizona BB-39

USS Arizona was a Pennsylvania-class battleship built for and by the United States Navy in the mid-1910s. Named in honor of the 48th state's recent admission into the union, the ship was the second and last of the Pennsylvania class of "super-dreadnought" battleships. Although commissioned in 1916, the ship remained stateside during World War I. Shortly after the end of the war, Arizona was one of a number of American ships that briefly escorted President Woodrow Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference. The ship was sent to Turkey in 1919 at the beginning of the Greco-Turkish War to represent American interests for several months. Several years later, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet and remained there for the rest of her career.

Aside from a comprehensive modernization in 1929–31, 
Arizona was regularly used for training exercises between the wars, including the annual Fleet Problems (training exercises). When an earthquake struck Long Beach, California, in 1933, Arizona's crew provided aid to the survivors. Two years later, the ship was featured in a Jimmy Cagney film, Here Comes the Navy, about the romantic troubles of a sailor. In April 1940, she and the rest of the Pacific Fleet were transferred from California to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as a deterrent to Japanese imperialism.

During the 
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Arizona was bombed. After a bomb detonated in a powder magazine, the battleship exploded violently and sank, killing 1,177 officers and crewmen. Unlike many of the other ships sunk or damaged that day, Arizona was irreparably damaged by the force of the magazine explosion, though the Navy removed parts of the ship for reuse. The wreck still lies at the bottom of Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona Memorial, dedicated on 30 May 1962 to all those who died during the attack, straddles the ship's hull.

 

 

 

 

USS California BB-44

A number of other boats were sunk in the attack, but later recovered and repaired.
The USS 
California (BB-44) lost 100 crew members that morning, after the ship suffered extensive flooding damage when hit by two torpedoes on the port side.
Both torpedoes detonated below the armor belt causing virtually identical damage each time.
A 250 kg bomb also entered the starboard upper deck level, which passed through the main deck and exploded on the armored second deck,
setting off an anti-aircraft ammunition magazine and killing about 50 men.

After three days of flooding, the California settled into the mud with only her superstructure remaining above the surface.
She was later re-floated and dry-docked at Pearl Harbor for repairs. USS 
California served many missions throughout the war,
and was eventually decommissioned in February, 1947.

 

 

 

USS Cassin DD-372

On the morning of December 7, 1941, Japanese bombs fell and torpedoes slashed through the waters of Pearl Harbor,
causing a devastating amount of damage to the vessels lined up in Battleship Row in in the dry docks nearby.
Each of the seven battleships moored there suffered some degree of damage, some far worse than others.
The USS 
Arizona (BB-39) and the USS Oklahoma (BB-37) were completely destroyed. Though the Maryland (BB-46) was believed by Japan to also have been sunk, she ultimately survived and became one of the first ships to return to the war.
During the attack on Pearl Harbor, ships like the USS 
Cassin (DD-372), a Mahan-class destroyer, suffered what was originally thought to be fatal damage.
While she was extensively damaged during the attack, she was resurrected and went on to return to service during the remainder of World War II.

 

 

 

USS West Virginia BB-48

The sunken battleship USS West Virginia (BB-48) at Pearl Harbor after her fires were out, possibly on 8 December 1941.
USS Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard. A Vought OS2U Kingfisher floatplane (marked “4-O-3”) is upside down on West Virginia’s main deck.
A second OS2U is partially burned out atop the Turret No. 3 catapult. 

In the aftermath of the attacks on Pearl Harbor during World War Two stories emerged of sailors who were trapped in the sunken battleships, some even survived for weeks.

Those who were trapped underwater banged continuously on the side of the ship so that anyone would hear them and come to their rescue.
When the noises were first heard many thought it was just loose wreckage or part of the clean-up operation for the destroyed harbor.

However the day after the attack, crewmen realized that there was an eerie banging noise coming from the forward hull of the USS West Virginia, which had sunk in the harbor.

t didn’t take long for the crew and Marines based at the harbor to realize that there was nothing they could do. They could not get to these trapped sailors in time.
Months later rescue and salvage men who raised the USS West Virginia found the bodies of three men who had found an airlock in a storeroom but had eventually run out of air.

Survivors say that no one wanted to go on guard duty anywhere near the USS West Virginia since they would hear the banging of trapped survivors all night long,
but with nothing that could be done.

When salvage crews raised the battleship West Virginia six months after the Pearl Harbor attacks,
they found the bodies of three sailors huddled in an airtight storeroom —
and a calendar on which 16 days had been crossed off in
red pencil.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma BB-37 

The USS Oklahoma was on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. That was the morning that the Japanese Empire attacked the United States by surprise.

The Japanese used dive–bombers, fighter–bombers, and torpedo planes to sink nine ships, including five battleships, and severely damage 21 ships.
There were 2,402 US deaths from the attack. 1,177 of those deaths were from the USS Arizona, while 429 of the deaths were from the USS Oklahoma.

The crew of the USS Oklahoma did everything they could to fight back. In the first ten minutes of the battle, though, eight torpedoes hit the Oklahoma, and she began to capsize.  A ninth torpedo would hit her as she sunk in the mud.  14 Marines, and 415 sailors would give their lives. 32 men were cut out through the hull while the others were beneath the waterline.  Banging could be heard for over 3 days and then there was silence.

After the battle, the Navy decided that they could not salvage the Oklahoma due to how much damage she had received.  The difficult savage job began in March 1943, and Oklahoma entered dry dock 28 December. Decommissioning  September 1, 1944, Oklahoma was stripped of guns and superstructure, and sold December 5, 1946 to Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif. Oklahoma parted her tow line and sank May 17, 1947.  540 miles out, bound from Pearl Harbor to San Francisco.  Today, there is a memorial to the USS Oklahoma and the 429 sailors and marines lost on December 7, 1941, located on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

USS Oglala CM-4

The minelayer Oglala technically didn't suffer a hit on December 7, but a torpedo passed under it and hit the USS Helena
The blast from that crippled the old 
Oglala which had been built as a civilian vessel in 1906.
The crewmembers took their guns to the Navy Yard Dock and set them up to provide more defenses.
They also set up a first aid station that saved the lives of West Virginia crewmembers.

The ship suffered horribly, eventually capsizing and sinking until just a few feet of the ship's starboard side remained above water.
It was declared lost, and the Navy even considered blowing it up with dynamite to clear the dock it had sunk next to.
But the decision was made that it could destroy the dock, so the Navy had to refloat it. At that point, it made sense to dry dock and repair it.

None of the crew of Oglala were killed in the attack, although three received injuries. 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

DPAA Makes 200th Identification from USS Oklahoma Unknown Remains.
Arlington, Virginia, March 8, 2019

 


Sean Patterson, Armed Forces Medical Examiner System Department of Defense DNA Quality Management Section DNA Analyst,
replaces U. S. Navy Fireman 1st Class Billy James Johnson's picture background, signifying him as an identified service member who was previously missing in action.
Johnson marks the 200th service member to be identified following the December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor
attack where 429 U.S. Sailors and Marines were killed on the USS Oklahoma (BB-37). 

A series of large posters hang in the conference room of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency laboratory located at Offutt Air Base, Nebraska.
The heading on each of the posters states “USS OKLAHOMA.” Underneath the headings are neat rows of printed rectangular frames. 
Each one represents a person who was unaccounted for when the USS Oklahoma was sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Thanks to the work of Dr. Brown’s team, the remains of 200 previously unknown crewmen from the USS Oklahoma
have now been returned to their families for proper burial and their families have those long-awaited answers.

The story of the USS Oklahoma’s lost crewmen is an evolving history lesson that began on what
President Franklin D. Roosevelt called

“a date that will live in infamy.”

 

LIST OF USS OKLAHOMA IDENTIFICATIONS FROM MICHIGAN:
(Please note that in some USS Oklahoma identifications,
the primary next of kin has yet to be notified,
and therefore the names will not be released at this time.)

*Ensign William M. Finnegan, 44, of Bessmer, Mich.

*Seaman 1st Class Robert W. Headington, 19, of Bay City, Michigan

*Machinist's Mate 1st Class Fred M. Jones, 31, of North Lake, Michigan

*Fireman 3rd Class Gerald G. Lehman, 18, of Hancock, Michigan

*Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, 19, of Ontonagon, Michigan

It is through this effort that the accounting community
has been able to honor the sacrifices of the USS Oklahoma Sailors and Marines
and their families who pushed for the fullest possible accounting of their loved ones.

 

 

 

Ford Island is seen in this aerial view during the Japanese attack on Pearl harbor December 7, 1941 in Hawaii.
(The photo was taken from a Japanese plane.)

 

 

Remember the fallen: In all, 429 people on board the battleship were killed in the attack.
Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.

 

 

Battleship USS Oklahoma unturned hull at the bottom of Pearl Harbor
after the devastating Japanese bombing attack on Dec. 7, 1941.

 

                                                                                                                      

 

 

                                                                                                   The North Texans of Pearl Harbor
                                                                                                      

                                                                                       Their obituaries tell of lives cut short – and of lives well lived.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Memorial at Pearl Harbor

 

 

 

 

 

THE KOREAN WAR, 1950-1957

 

 


 

Breakdown by War - Still Unaccounted for/Unreturned Veterans:

WW II      72,579
Korea        7,578
Vietnam     1,586
Cold War      126
Gulf/Other        6
Total         81,775

 

 

 

 

 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following WWII from MICHIGAN - 2457
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Korea from MICHIGAN - 334
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Cold War from MICHIGAN - 4
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Viet Nam from MICHIGAN - 48
 

 


 

RECENTLY FOUND
 HEROES in 2020

 

 

Pilot killed From World War II Accounted For
October 20, 2020

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Earl W. Smith, 22

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Earl W. Smith, 22, of Oakland, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1943, Smith was a pilot assigned to the 80th Fighter Squadron, 8th Fighter Group, 5th Air Force. On Aug. 20, Smith was piloting a P-38 Lightning fighter on a test flight near Port Moresby, Australian Territory of Papua (current day Papua New Guinea), when he crashed into the harbor off of Paga Point. Smith did not bail out and his body was not recovered.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Command, the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel, searched the area around Port Moresby several times, concluding their final search on Dec. 18, 1948. Investigators could not find any evidence that Smith’s remains had ever washed ashore. He was declared non-recoverable Aug. 17, 1949.

In 2002, recreational divers discovered aircraft wreckage with a legible radio call sign data plate matching Smith’s P-38 off of Paga Point. In 2014, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Agency (a predecessor organization to DPAA) evaluated the evidence and approved a recovery mission, but didn’t set a date. DPAA sent a team to Papua New Guinea at the end of 2018. The team recovered possible human remains and material evidence that identified the wreckage as the aircraft piloted by Smith.

Smith’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial in Philippines, along with others still missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Smith will be buried Aug. 20, 2021, at a location yet to be determined.

 

 

Currently there are 72,624 service members still unaccounted for from World War II.

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 20, 2020

Navy Ship’s Cook 1st Class Rodger C. Butts, 47

Navy Ship’s Cook 1st Class Rodger C. Butts, 47, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Butts was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Butts.

Butts is buried at Oklahoma Memorial  located on Ford Island, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2020

Navy Seaman 2nd Class James M. Flanagan, 22

Navy Seaman 2nd Class James M. Flanagan, 22, of Jacksonville, Florida, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Flanagan was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Flanagan.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Flanagan.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Flanagan’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Flanagan will be buried on Nov. 6, 2020 at the NMCP.

 

 

 

 

USS West Virginia Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2020

Navy Fireman 3rd Class William L. Barnett, 21

Navy Fireman 3rd Class William L. Barnett, 21, Ft. Scott, Bourbon, Kansas killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Barnett was assigned to the battleship USS West Virginia, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS West Virginia sustained multiple torpedo hits, but timely counter-flooding measures taken by the crew prevented it from capsizing, and it came to rest on the shallow harbor floor.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 106 crewmen, including Barnett.

Barnett is buried at Oklahoma Memorial  located on Ford Island, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2020

Navy Fireman 1st Class Edward D. Johnson, 24

 Navy Fireman 1st Class Edward D. Johnson, 24, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Johnson was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Johnson.

Johnson will be buried at IndianapolisMarion CountyIndiana

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2020

Navy Shipfitter 1st Class Charles F. Perdue, 32

Navy Shipfitter 1st Class Charles F. Perdue, 32, killed during World War II, was accounted fof.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Perdue was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Perdue.

Perdue is buried at Oklahoma Memorial  located on Ford Island, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2020

Navy Seaman 2nd Class D.T. Kyser, 18

Navy Seaman 2nd Class D.T. Kyser, 18, of Muskogee, Oklahoma, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kyser was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Kyser.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Kyser.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Kyser’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

The date and location for Kyser’s burial have yet to be decided by the family.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 15, 2020

Navy Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Shelby Treadway, 25

Navy Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Shelby Treadway, 25, Jefferson County, Kentucky killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Treadway was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Treadway.

Shelby Treadway is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 15, 2020

Navy Fire Controlman 1st Class Bernard R. Wimmer, 28

Navy Fire Controlman 1st Class Bernard R. Wimmer, 28, Mercer County West Virginia was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Wimmer was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wimmer.

Bernard R. Wimmer is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 15, 2020

Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class George M. Gooch, 22

Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class George M. Gooch, 22, Purdin, Linn County, Missouri killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gooch was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Gooch.

George M. Gooch buried in Laclede Cemetery, Linn CountyMissouri.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 15, 2020

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Charles A. Jones, 21

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Charles A. Jones, 21, Morrill NE,  killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Jones was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Jones.

Charles A. Jones is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 14, 2020

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Martin D. Young, 21

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Martin D. Young, 21, of Hawesville, Kentucky, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Young was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Young.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Young.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Young’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

Young’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Young will be buried on May 15, 2021, in Lewisport, Kentucky.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 14, 2020

Navy Seaman 1st Class Maurice V. Spangler, 20

Navy Seaman 1st Class Maurice V. Spangler, 20, of Defiance, Ohio, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Spangler was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Spangler.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Spangler.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Spangler’s remains, scientists from DPAA anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

Spangler’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Spangler will be buried Sept. 12, 2021 at the Punchbowl.

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 2, 2020

 Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Jacob Cruz, 18

 Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Jacob Cruz, 18, of Los Angeles, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Cruz was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Cruz, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

Cruz’s name is recorded in the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Cruz died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

Cruz will be buried Nov. 13, 2020, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 2, 2020

Marine Corps Cpl. Elmer E. Drefahl, 22

Marine Corps Cpl. Elmer E. Drefahl, 22, Milwaukee, WI killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Drefahl was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Drefahl.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 2, 2020

Marine Pfc. Henry E. Ellis, 22

 Marine Pfc. Henry E. Ellis, 22, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Ellis was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Service Battalion, 1st Marine Division.

He was killed in action on Nov. 30, 1950, while defending the convoy of which he was a member near Koto-ri, North Korea.

His body was not immediately recovered, though many deceased Marines were later recovered and buried in the United Nations Cemetery at Koto-ri as UN forces withdrew from the area.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
October 1, 2020

Army Cpl. Robert C. Agard, Jr., 19

Army Cpl. Robert C. Agard, Jr., 19, Chicago, Illinois killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In July 1950, Agard was a member of 2nd Platoon, 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on July 19 while conducting a night recon patrol with his unit near Taejon, South Korea.

He was never found, nor were any remains recovered that could be identified as Agard.

He was declared non-recoverable in January 1956.

 

 

Today, 7,562 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 30, 2020

Navy Hospital Apprentice 1st Class John M. Mulick, 21

Navy Hospital Apprentice 1st Class John M. Mulick, 21, of Elma, Iowa, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Mulick was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Mulick.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Mulick.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Mulick’s remains, scientists from DPAA dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used Y chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

Mulick’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

The date and location for Mulick’s burial have yet to be decided by the family.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 30, 2020

Navy Fireman 1st Class Louis J. Tushla, 25

Navy Fireman 1st Class Louis J. Tushla, 25, of Atkinson, Nebraska, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tushla was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Tushla.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Tushla.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Tushla’s remains, scientists from DPAA dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used Y chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

Tushla’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Tushla will be buried July 17, 2021, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
September 29, 2020

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Howard E. Miller, 22

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Howard E. Miller, 22, of San Mateo, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Miller was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Miller, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Miller’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

Miller’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Miller died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

Miller will be buried Nov. 6, 2020, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 29, 2020

U.S. Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Alton W. Whitson, 22

U.S. Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Alton W. Whitson, 22, of Seattle, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Whitson was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Whitson.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Whitson.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Whitson’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Whitson will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, in October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
September 29, 2020

Marine Corps Pfc. John P. Langan, 18

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. John P. Langan, 18, of Columbus, Nebraska, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Langan was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Langan died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943. He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Langan, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

Langan’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Langan died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

Langan will be buried in Platte Center, Nebraska. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
September 28, 2020

Army Sgt. Jesse "Johnny" D. Hill, 20

Army Sgt. Jesse "Johnny "D. Hill, 20, Highland Park, Michigan killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Hill was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

On July 27, 2018, following the summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un in June 2018, North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Hill’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Hill’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Hill will be buried in Holly, Michigan. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

Airmen Killed  From Vietnam War Accounted For
September 25
, 2020

U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul A. Avolese, 35

U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul A. Avolese, 35, East Meadow, N.Y. was killed during the Vietnam War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

Major Avolese was a member of the 2nd Bomber Squadron. On July 7, 1967, he was a member of the crew of a Boeing Stratofortress Bomber (B-52D) 20 miles offshore over the South China Sea,
when it collided with another B-52D bomber. His remains were not recovered.

That day, he was part of the crew of a B-52D Stratofortress bomber conducting a bombing mission from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, to a target in Vietnam.

During a maneuver over the South China Sea, Avolese’s bomber collided with another B-52, causing both aircraft to fall into the sea.

 Four of the crew members from his aircraft were rescued, but Avolese was never recovered.

 He was declared dead on July 24.

Died while Missing, boy not recovered". Incident location: South China Sea.

 

 

Today there are 1,585 American servicemen and civilians that are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
September 24, 2020

Army Pvt. Donald A. Fabrize, 17

Army Pvt. Donald A. Fabrize, 17, Cayuga County, New York killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In July 1950, Fabrize was a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division.

He was reported killed in action on July 16 during battle defending, then withdrawing from, positions along the Kum River in South Korea.

His remains could not be immediately located or recovered.

The Army deemed Fabrize non-recoverable on Jan. 16, 1956.

Donald A Fabrize is buried or memorialized at Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 23, 2020

Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Alphard S. Owsley, 23

Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Alphard S. Owsley, 23, Bourbon County, Kentucky was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Owsley was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Owsley.

"Missing in action or lost at sea". Incident location: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
September 22, 2020

 Army Pfc. Bobbie Ray Daniels, 17

 Army Pfc. Bobbie Ray Daniels, 17, Pike County, Kentucky was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In August 1950, Daniels was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division.

Private First Class Daniels  listed MIA on Sept. 16, 1950. He was presumed dead on Dec. 31, 1953 during battle near Waegwan, South Korea.

His remains could not be immediately recovered. He was officially declared dead on May 1, 1953.

The ceremony will be Sept. 21 in Estes Plaza at the Memorial in BEDFORD, Va.

 

 

 

 

 

Sailor From World War II Accounted For
September 22, 2020

Army Pfc. Oliver Jeffers, 31

Army Pfc. Oliver Jeffers, 31, of Huntsville, Tennessee, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1944, Jeffers was assigned to Company L, 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. His unit was engaged in battle with German forces near Germeter, Germany, in the Hürtgen Forest, when he was killed in action on Nov. 10. Jeffers could not be recovered because of the on-going fighting.

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command was tasked with investigating and recovering missing American personnel in Europe. They conducted several investigations in the Hürtgen area between 1946 and 1950, but were unable to recover or identify Jeffers’ remains. He was declared non-recoverable in 1951.

While studying unresolved American losses in the Hürtgen area, a DPAA historian determined that one set of unidentified remains, designated X-2735 Neuville, recovered from a minefield near Germeter in 1946 possibly belonged to Jeffers. The remains, which had been buried in Ardennes American Cemetery in 1950, were disinterred in April 2018 and sent to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for identification.

Jeffers’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Margarten, Netherlands, along with the others still missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Jeffers will be buried Oct. 7, 2020, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

Pilot From World War II Accounted For
September 22, 2020

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Gabriel J. Eggud, 25

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Gabriel J. Eggud, 25, Queens N.Y. was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In the summer of 1944, Eggud was a pilot assigned to the 110th Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter), 71st Reconnaissance Group.

On July 6, he was piloting a P-39 Airacobra fighter on a combat mission over Wewak, New Guinea, when a released bomb exploded and destroyed his aircraft.

Efforts to recover Eggud’s remains were unsuccessful.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
September 15, 2020

Army Pvt. Warren G.H. DeVault, 24

Army Pvt. Warren G.H. DeVault, 24, Rhea County, Tennessee killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In November 1944, DeVault was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division.

His unit was engaged in battle with German forces near Hürtgen, Germany, when he was reportedly killed in action on Nov. 20.

DeVault could not be recovered because of the on-going fighting, and his remains were not recovered or identified.

Warren G H De Vault is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 15, 2020

Navy Mess Attendant 3rd Class Isaac Parker, 17

Navy Mess Attendant 3rd Class Isaac Parker, 17, St. Louis CountyMissouri was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Parker was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Parker.

He has a grave at the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in Section MA, site 35 in Lemay, Missouri.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 11, 2020

Navy Musician 1st Class Joseph W. Hoffman, 24

Navy Musician 1st Class Joseph W. Hoffman, 24, Lyndon, Ohio was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hoffman was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Hoffman.

 

 

 

 

USS Colorado Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 10, 2020

Navy Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Harold L. Dick, 22

Navy Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Harold L. Dick, 22, of Tipton, Missouri, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On July 24, 1944, Dick was aboard the battleship USS Colorado, which was moored approximately 3,200 yards from the shore of Tinian Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Early in the morning, the USS Colorado, along with the light cruiser USS Cleveland and destroyers USS Remey and USS Norman Scott, commenced firing toward the island. Within two hours, a concealed Japanese shore battery opened fire on the USS Colorado and the USS Norman Scott. The first hit on the USS Colorado resulted in a heavy explosion, and the ship sustained extensive fragmentation damage. From the attack, four crewmen were declared missing in action, and 39 personnel were killed, including Dick. Dick and the other casualties were subsequently interred in the 4th Marine Division Cemetery on Saipan.

In February 1948, under the direction of the American Graves Registration Service’s 9105th Technical Service Unit, three battlefield cemeteries, including the 4th Marine Division Cemetery, were disinterred. While the majority of identifications that had been tentatively made following the attack were upheld, nine sets were reclassified as “unknown.” Of those, five were eventually identified. The remaining four were interred at the Manila American Memorial and Cemetery in the Philippines.


To identify Dick’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Dick’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Dick will be buried Oct. 10, 2020, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 10, 2020

Navy Shipfitter 3rd Class Patrick L. Chess, 24

 Navy Shipfitter 3rd Class Patrick L. Chess, 24, of Yakima, Washington, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Chess was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Chess.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Chess.

Chess’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Chess will be buried Oct. 22, 2020, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 10
, 2020

U.S. Naval Reserve Ensign Francis C. Flaherty, 22

U.S. Naval Reserve Ensign Francis C. Flaherty, 22, of Charlotte, Michigan, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Flaherty was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Flaherty. Flaherty was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for saving several crew members at the cost of his own life.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Flaherty.

Flaherty’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Flaherty will be buried in his hometown. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
September 8
, 2020

 Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Frank L. Athon, Jr., 29

 Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Frank L. Athon, Jr., 29, of Cincinnati, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Athon was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Athon, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Athon’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

Athon’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Athon died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

Athon will be buried Nov. 21, 2020, in Philadelphia.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
August 31
, 2020

 Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Thomas F. Johnson, 18

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Thomas F. Johnson, 18, of San Jose, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Johnson was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Johnson, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.


Johnson’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Johnson died on the fourth day of battle, Nov. 23, 1943.

 He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

Johnson will be buried in Igo, California. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
August 27, 2020

Navy Coxswain Layton T. Banks, 20

Navy Coxswain Layton T. Banks, 20, of Dallas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Banks was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Banks.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Banks.


Banks’ name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Banks will be buried Oct. 24, 2020, in Plano, Texas.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
August 27, 2020

Navy Fireman 1st Class Frank E. Nicoles, 24

Navy Fireman 1st Class Frank E. Nicoles, 24, of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Nicoles was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Nicoles.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Nicoles.


Nicoles’ name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Nicoles’ family has yet to decide on a funeral date or location.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
August 26, 2020

Navy Fire Controlman 2nd Class George Gilbert, 20

Navy Fire Controlman 2nd Class George Gilbert, 20, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gilbert was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Gilbert.

 

 

 

 

 

USS West Virginia Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
August 26, 2020

Navy Seaman 1st Class Carl S. Johnson, 20

Navy Seaman 1st Class Carl S. Johnson, 20, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Johnson was assigned to the battleship USS West Virginia, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS West Virginia sustained multiple torpedo hits, but timely counter-flooding measures taken by the crew prevented it from capsizing, and it came to rest on the shallow harbor floor.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 106 crewmen, including Johnson.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
August 20, 2020

Army Sgt. John E. Hurlburt, 26

Army Sgt. John E. Hurlburt, 26, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In July 1944, Hurlburt was a member of the 105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division.

He was killed July 7 during a massive Japanese attack against the 105th on the island of Saipan.

His remains were not known to have been recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
August 19, 2020

U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Charles G. McMackin, 26

U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Charles G. McMackin, 26, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1943, McMackin was assigned to the 68th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 44th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 8th Air Force.

On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24 Liberator aircraft on which McMackin was serving as a bombadier crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation TIDAL WAVE, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti, north of Bucharest, Romania.

His remains were not identified following the war.

The remains that could not be identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
August 12, 2020

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Charles D. Miller, 19

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Charles D. Miller, 19, of Albany, Indiana, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Miller was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Miller, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Miller’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Miller’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II.
 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Miller died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

Miller will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has not yet been decided on by the family.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
August 10
, 2020

Army Sgt. James N. Stryker, 20

Army Sgt. James N. Stryker, 20, Dallas, Texas. killed during the Korean War, was accounted for Aug. 5, 2020.

In May 1951, Stryker was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on May 18, when the enemy attacked his unit near Han’gye, South Korea.

 His remains could not be immediately recovered, but he was not officially declared dead until after the Armistice was signed July 27, 1953.

Stryker now rest in the Military Cemetery of the Pacific at the Punchbowl in Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

Today, 7,565 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
August 6
, 2020

Marine Corps Sgt. George R. Reeser, 25

Marine Corps Sgt. George R. Reeser, 25, of Washington, Illinois, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Reeser was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Reeser, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Reeser’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

Reeser’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Reeser died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943. He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

Reeser will be buried Sept. 26 in Deer Creek, Illinois.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
July 21
, 2020

Army Pfc. Glenn E. Collins, 21

Army Pfc. Glenn E. Collins, 21, of Tucson, Arizona, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Collins, was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Collins’ remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Collins’ name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.
 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.


Collins will be buried in his hometown at a date yet to be decided by the family.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
July 15
, 2020

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. John E. Gillen, 20

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. John E. Gillen, 20, of Champaign, Illinois, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Gillen was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.
Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Gillen, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In March 2019, excavations west of Cemetery 33 revealed a previously undiscovered burial site that has since been identified as Row D. The remains recovered at this site were transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Gillen’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

Gillen’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Gillen died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

Gillen will be buried Aug. 12, 2020, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

Pilot Killed  From Vietnam War Accounted For
July 14, 2020

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Alva Ray Krogman, 25

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Alva R. Krogman, 25, Worland WY. killed during the Vietnam War, was accounted for.

On Jan. 17, 1967, Krogman was a pilot assigned to the 504th Tactical Air Support Group, 7th Air Force, on temporary duty with the 23rd Tactical Air Support Squadron operating out of Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand.

That morning, he was flying an O1-F Birddog aircraft as part of a flight of two planes conducting a visual reconnaissance mission in Savannakhet Province, Laos.

 At approximately 8:55 a.m. local time, Krogman’s aircraft was hit by enemy fire in the left wing and went down.
Search and rescue operations began immediately, but were shut down within a few hours after one of the search and rescue aircraft was also shot down.

Krogman was never recovered and was declared killed in action on Jan. 31.

Alva Ray Krogman is memorialized at Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial - body not recovered

 

 

Today there are 1,586 American servicemen and civilians that are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
July 9
, 2020

Army Cpl. Francis J. Rochon, 21

Army Cpl. Francis J. Rochon, 21, of Superior, Wisconsin, reported missing in action during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Rochon was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Sept. 1, 1950, near Changnyeong, South Korea.

In January 1951, the American Graves Registration Service Group (AGRSG) consolidated the remains from 12 smaller military cemeteries at the newly established United Nations Military Cemetery in Tanggok, South Korea, including one set of remains designated X-175 Tanggok, which had been recovered from the area where Rochon was last seen. In 1956, the remains, including X-175 Tanggok, were unable to be identified, and then transported to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu where they were buried as Unknowns.

DPAA historians and analysts were able to determine that others buried in the same original, small cemetery as X-175 Tanggok had been lost in the same area as Rochon, and put forth his name as a possible match. The family of another Soldier lost during the same battle as Rochon also put in a request to have X-175 Tanggok and one other Unknown disinterred in hopes one of them would be their loved one. On Nov. 5, 2018, X-175 Tanggok was disinterred and sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Rochon’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.


Rochon’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

The Army officially declared Rochon deceased on Dec. 31, 1953, and declared his remains non-recoverable Jan. 16, 1956.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Rochon will be buried July 25, 2020 in Foxboro, Wisconsin.

 

 

 

 

 

Pilot  killed From World War II Accounted For
July 7
, 2020

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. William H. Melville, 20

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. William H. Melville, 20, Minneapolis, MN. killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the fall of 1943, Melville was a pilot assigned to the 36th Fighter Squadron, 8th Fighter Group. On Oct. 28, he was piloting a P-39Q Airacobra fighter on a combat mission over the island
of New Guinea, Australian Territory of Papua (current day Papua New Guinea), when his aircraft and two others disappeared after encountering severe weather.

Search and recovery efforts in the days following were unable to find any of the aircraft.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
July 2
, 2020

Army Cpl. Richard L. Henderson, Jr., 18

Army Cpl. Richard L. Henderson, Jr., 18, Barton, New York killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Henderson was a member of Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.

The Chinese attacked their positions on the evening of December 3 and again overnight on December 5-6. A general withdrawal to Hamhung began on December 6. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

 He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
June 25
, 2020

Navy Fire Controlman 3rd Class Robert T. Stout, 21

Navy Fire Controlman 3rd Class Robert T. Stout, 21, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Stout was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Stout.

Place of Burial: USS Oklahoma Memorial Pearl Harbor Honolulu County Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
June 23
, 2020

Marine Corps Pfc. John M. Fahy, 19

Marine Corps Pfc. John M. Fahy, 19, North Sea, N.Y. killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Fahy was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Fahy died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
June 23
, 2020

Army Master Sgt. James L. Quong, 30

Army Master Sgt. James L. Quong, 30, Fort Worth, Texas killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Quong, who was an Army Reserve captain in World War II but gave up his commission to join the Regular Army as a master sergeant in the Korean War, was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953.

 Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
June 16
, 2020

Army Cpl. Billie Joe Hash, 18

Army Cpl. Billie Joe Hash, 18, of Corbin, Kentucky, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Hash was a member of Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.
He was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.


North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam,
Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


Hash’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.
A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.


Hash will be buried Aug. 29, 2020, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
June 12
, 2020

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Irvin F. Rice, 22

 

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Irvin F. Rice, 22, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Rice was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Rice.

Place of Burial: USS Oklahoma Memorial Pearl Harbor Honolulu County Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
June 12
, 2020

Navy Seaman 1st Class Wesley E. Graham, 21

Navy Seaman 1st Class Wesley E. Graham, 21, from Benton Harbor, Michigan was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Graham was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Graham.

Place of Burial: USS Oklahoma Memorial Pearl Harbor Honolulu County Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
June 12
, 2020

Navy Seaman 2nd Class James M. Flanagan, 22

Navy Seaman 2nd Class James M. Flanagan, 22, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Flanagan was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Flanagan.

Place of Burial: USS Oklahoma Memorial Pearl Harbor Honolulu County Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
June 9
, 2020

Army Cpl. Pete Conley, 19

Army Cpl. Pete Conley, 19, Chapmanville, West Virginia was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Conley was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
June 8
, 2020

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Thomas E. Griffith, 20

Navy Radioman 3rd Class Thomas E. Griffith, 20, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Griffith was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Griffith.

Place of Burial: USS Oklahoma Memorial Pearl Harbor Honolulu County Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
June 8
, 2020

Army Sgt. Stanley L. DeWitt, 18,

Army Sgt. Stanley L. DeWitt, 18, Royal Center, Indiana was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, DeWitt was a member of Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.

He was listed as Missing in Action while tending his wounded comrades in North Korea on or about December 2, 1950. He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. 

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. , his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
June 1
, 2020

Army Master Sgt. James Hart, Jr., 25,

Army Master Sgt. James Hart, Jr., 25, Pickton, Texas and his family lived in Como, Hopkins County, Texas was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Hart was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
June 1
, 2020

Army 1st Lt. Anthony R. Mazzulla, 26

Army 1st Lt. Anthony R. Mazzulla, 26, Bronx, New York and the family later lived in Johnston, Rhode Island was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Mazzulla was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

Chinese roadblocks from Sinhung-ni to Hagaru-ri along with the constant enemy fire from the surrounding high ground, made the withdrawal route extremely dangerous.
Eventually, the column was broken into separate segments, which the CCF attacked individually.

Many men were lost or captured during the moving battle, with survivors reaching friendly lines in Hagaru-ri on December 2 and 3.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950,.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
May 29
, 2020

Army Pfc. John J. Sitarz, 19

Army Pfc. John J. Sitarz, 19, West Virginia was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1944, Sitarz was assigned to Company L, 3rd Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division.

His unit was engaged in battle with German forces near Germeter, Germany, in the Hürtgen Forest, when he was declared missing in action on Nov. 2.

Sitarz could not be recovered because of the on-going fighting, and his status was changed to killed in action on Nov. 3, 1945.

He was reported to have been buried in Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery Belgium.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
May 20, 2020

Army Cpl. R.B. Cherry, 19

Army Cpl. R.B. Cherry, 19, Dallas, Texas Died While Captured (POW) during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Cherry was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.

He was captured by enemy forces on November 27, as his unit attempted to fight their way out of enemy held territory near Unsan, North Korea.

He was marched to a temporary holding camp in the Pukchin-Tarigol Valley, and in January was marched to Camp 5 on the south bank of the Yalu River near Pyoktong.

He died on an unspecified date in 1951, and was buried near the camp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
May 20
, 2020

Army Sgt. William E. Cavender, 20

Army Sgt. William E. Cavender, 20, Stockbridge, Michigan killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

On November 27, 1950, the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), tasked with replacing the 5th Marine Regiment on the east side of the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea, arrived at the P'ungnyuri Inlet.
That night, Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) launched a massive surprise attack against the soldiers and Marines at the inlet.

The 31st RCT managed to repel the numerically superior CCF’s initial attack; however, the enemy continued to attack over the next two nights.
On December 1, the 31st RCT began its withdrawal from the P'ungnyuri Inlet to Hagaru-ri.

He was reported missing in action on Nov. 28, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

Army Sgt. William E. Cavender is buried or memorialized at Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
May 19
, 2020

Marine Corps Pfc. Mervin D. Galland, 24

Marine Corps Pfc. Mervin D. Galland, 24, of Eveleth, Minnesota, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Galland was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio
in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Galland died on the third day of battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
May 1
9, 2020

Navy Metalsmith 1st Class Leonard F. Smith, 29,

Navy Metalsmith 1st Class Leonard F. Smith, 29, Pennsylvania, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Smith was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Smith.

Navy Metalsmith 1st Class Leonard F. Smith is memorialized on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
May 1
9, 2020

Navy Fireman 1st Class Louis J. Tushla, 25

Navy Fireman 1st Class Louis J. Tushla, 25, Holt, Nebraska, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tushla was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Tushla.

Navy Fireman 1st Class Louis J. Tushla is memorialized on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
May 1
5, 2020

 Navy Seaman 2nd Class Floyd D. Helton, 18

 Navy Seaman 2nd Class Floyd D. Helton, 18, California killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Helton was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Helton.

Seaman Second Class Helton is memorialized on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
May 8
, 2020

Army Pvt. Charles Andrews, 25

Army Pvt. Charles Andrews, 25, Rochester, New York killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In December 1944, Andrews was assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division.

His unit was engaged in battle with German forces near Brandenburg, Germany, in the Hürtgen Forest, when he was declared missing in action on Dec. 4.

Andrews could not be recovered because of the on-going fighting, and his status was changed to killed in action on Jan. 29, 1945.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
May 5
, 2020

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert D. Jenks, 20

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert D. Jenks, 20, Huron, SD killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Jenks was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of
Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

November 1943, as Jenks was helping his company fight off a banzai attack, a shell exploded overhead. The twenty-one-year-old PFC died from shrapnel wounds to his head and chest.

Jenks died on either the third or fourth day of battle, Nov. 22-23, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
May 1
, 2020

Naval Reserve Seaman 1st Class James C. Williams, 20

Naval Reserve Seaman 1st Class James C. Williams, 20, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Williams was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Williams.

Memorial located in Pearl Harbor on Ford Island where the USS Oklahoma was when sank.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
May 1
, 2020

Navy Fireman 1st Class Samuel C. Steiner, 20

Navy Fireman 1st Class Samuel C. Steiner, 20, Highmore, S.D. killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Steiner was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Steiner.

Memorial located in Pearl Harbor on Ford Island where the USS Oklahoma was when sank.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
April 28
, 2020

Army Staff Sgt. Raymond C. Blanton, 19

Army Staff Sgt. Raymond C. Blanton, 19, Richmond, Virginia killed during World War II, was accounted for.

Carlyle dropped out of school at 16 years of age to help to support his family.  He worked as an Oil Man, changing oil in military vehicles at the location of the Virginia Militia headquarters for 18 months before he joined the Militia.
He gave all the money he earned in the VA Militia to his parents before being drafted at 18
.

In October 1944, Blanton was assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division.

His unit was engaged in battle with German forces near Germeter, Germany, in the Raffelsbrand Forest, when he was killed in action on Oct. 14.

Blanton could not be recovered because of the on-going fighting. His remains were then declared “non recoverable” on December 20th, 1951.

Carlyle was memorialized on the “Wall of Missing” at the US Cemetery in Margraten, The Netherlands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
April 27
, 2020

Army Pfc. Clarence W. Brotherton, 20

Army Pfc. Clarence W. Brotherton, 20, of Gibson City, Illinois, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In October 1944, Brotherton was assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division.

His unit was engaged in battle with German forces near Germeter, Germany, in the Raffelsbrand Forest.

Brotherton was killed in action on Oct. 14. body not recovered because of the on-going fighting.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
April 27
, 2020

Marine Corps Reserve 1st Lt. Hugh D. Fricks, 22

Marine Corps Reserve 1st Lt. Hugh D. Fricks, 22, of Memphis, Tennessee, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Fricks was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio
in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

 He was ultimately killed by grenade fragments in the early morning hours of 23 November, and was buried near where he fell.

Fricks died on the fourth day of battle, Nov. 23, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 27
, 2020

Army Cpl. Burl Mullins, 23

Army Cpl. Burl Mullins, 23, Big Branch, Kentucky killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Mullins, who also served during World War II, was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

Died While Captured (POW) was reported missing in action on Nov. 30, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
April 27
, 2020

Marine Corps Cpl. Raymond J. Tuhey, 24

Marine Corps Cpl. Raymond J. Tuhey, 24, of Lombard, IL, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Tuhey was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio
in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

 He was shot in the head and killed on the final day of the battle, 23 November 1943.

Tuhey died on the fourth day of battle, Nov. 23, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 27
, 2020

Army Cpl. Dale W. Wright, 19

Army Cpl. Dale W. Wright, 19, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Wright was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
April 27
, 2020

 Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Harold W. Hayden, 19

 Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Harold W. Hayden, 19, Cincinnati, OH killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Hayden was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio
in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Hayden
was shot and killed on the night of 22 November 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Row D of the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
April 24
, 2020

Army Pfc. Oliver Jeffers, 31

Army Pfc. Oliver Jeffers, 31, Helenwood, Scott County, Tenn. killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In November 1944, Jeffers was assigned to Company L, 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. His unit was engaged in battle with German forces near Germeter,
Germany, in the Hürtgen Forest.

Jeffers  was killed in action on Nov. 10. Jeffers could not be recovered because of the on-going fighting.

The Battle of Hürtgen Forest was one of a series of fierce battles fought between American and German forces along the Western Front during the war. Located along the Belgian-German border.
The battle was entering its third month when Jeffers was killed. 

 The battle was depicted by a 1998 HBO film, 
When Trumpets Fade
.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 23
, 2020

Army Sgt. Lloyd A. Alumbaugh, 21

Army Sgt. Lloyd A. Alumbaugh, 21, Jasper, Missouri killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Alumbaugh was a member of Ambulance Company, 7th Medical Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 28, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. 

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 22
, 2020

Army Cpl. Charles E. Hiltibran, 19

Army Cpl. Charles E. Hiltibran, 19, Urbana, Ohio killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Hiltibran was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. 

 Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 22
, 2020

Army Pfc. Louis N. Crosby, 18

Army Pfc. Louis N. Crosby, 18, Orangeburg, S.C. killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Crosby was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. 

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 22
, 2020

Army Pfc. William "Bill" F. Hobbs, 20

 Army Pfc. William "Bill" F. Hobbs, 20, South Coffeyville, Oklahoma killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Hobbs was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 30, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. 

 Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 21
, 2020

Army Cpl. Ralph S. Boughman, 21

Army Cpl. Ralph S. Boughman, 21, Union, South Carolina killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Boughman was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. 

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 21
, 2020

Army Cpl. Clifford S. Johnson, 20

Army Cpl. Clifford S. Johnson, 20, Valatie, New York killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Johnson was a member of Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 20
, 2020

Army Sgt. 1st Class Frank G. Vejar, 19

Army Sgt. 1st Class Frank G. Vejar, 19, Douglas, Arizona killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Vejar was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 30, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953. 

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 20
, 2020

 Army Cpl. Benjamin R. Bazzell, 18

 Army Cpl. Benjamin R. Bazzell, 18, New Haven, Conn. was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Bazzell was a member of Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported killed in action on Nov. 30, 1950,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

 Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 17
, 2020

Army 1st Lt. Thomas J. Redgate, 24

Army 1st Lt. Thomas J. Redgate, 24, Brighton, Massachusetts was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Redgate was a member of Battery A, 48th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 11, 1950, when his unit was attacked
by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

 Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
April 17
, 2020

Marine Corps Sgt. Fred Farris, 19

Marine Corps Sgt. Fred Farris, 19, China Springs, China Springs, TX killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Farris was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Farris  was struck and killed by fragments from an exploding shell and died on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

He was reported to have been buried in Cemetery 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
April 17
, 2020

Army Cpl. Henry L. Helms, 24

Army Cpl. Henry L. Helms, 24, Ringgold, Georgia killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Helms was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

 He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
April 16
, 2020

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. John W. Hoffman, Jr., 21

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. John W. Hoffman, Jr., 21, Houston, TX was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Hoffman was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

He died of gunshot wounds suffered on 23 November 1943, and was buried near where he fell, in a trench alongside some thirty other Marines.

Hoffman