RECENTLY FOUND HEROES

 

from ALL PAST WARS

 

 

HONOR THE DEAD BY HELPING THE LIVING”

Today, the DPAA is focused on the research, investigation, recovery, and identification
of the approximately 34,000 (out of approximately 83,000 missing DoD personnel)
believed to be recoverable, who were lost in conflicts from World War II to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

"Returning with Honor"
March 03, 2017

KHAMMOUANE, Laos --

With 1,614 service members missing in action from the Vietnam War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) deploys hundreds of service members,
DoD civilians, and contractors all over the world in hopes of returning our nation’s fallen heroes.

Recently a team of 59 personnel completed DPAA’s second Laos mission of fiscal year 2017, covering the Central East region of Laos. From rice patties to mountainsides,
the teams excavated thousands of square meters of land recovering important evidence relating to missing servicemen lost during the war.

“I’m very honored to have been part of this initiative to bring our missing home,” said U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chris Walgenbach,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “This mission has been the most unique part of my 13 year career in the military and I know others feel the same way.”

Every team member plays an important role in mission success. Whether that is the recovery non-commissioned officer setting up the sites,
or the recovery leader collecting scientific data, working together ensures nothing is overlooked and the safety of the team remains number one priority.

Due to the efforts of the teams, Laos representatives handed over possible remains to the U.S. to be repatriated and welcomed back on American soil after 48 years.
Upon arrival the possible remains will be transported to DPAA’s laboratory for examination and possible identification.

“During this mission I have worked along side some of the greatest men and women I’ve had the pleasure of meeting,
and being chosen for the repatriation ceremony was a perfect way to end such a great mission,” said U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Andrew Brod,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “It is truly an honor to be bringing closure to the families of our fallen service members.”

The hard work and continued dedication of these teams makes it possible for DPAA to fulfill our nations promise and
provide fullest possible accounting for our missing service members to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Ameil Fredeluces, edic, and U.S. Marine Corps. Staff Sgt. Eddie Ludwig, explosive ordinance disposal technician,
remove dirt from units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos,
January 29, 2017.  Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual
reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting
for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency dig units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 26, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing
U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the
fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Jack Kenkeo, life support investigator, shovels dirt from the screening stations during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Francis Sangiamvongse, linguist, screens soil with local villagers during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA
Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 29, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search
of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Lynn Rakos, scientific recovery expert, waters hard soil to help with excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission
in the Khammovan Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

In March of 2017, Making the effort to thank the troops for what they do out in the field means everything.
With a DPAA recovery team in Quang Nam Province, two hours west of Da Nang, Vietnam.

 

 

Disappearance of two Madison airmen in 1953 remains a mystery

The unsolved case called "one of the most enduring mysteries of the Great Lakes"
has been the subject of numerous articles and a film on Canadian television.

The UW-Madison story involved a group of six students and staff members who were part of a team that unearthed a World War II U.S. fighter aircraft—
and possibly remains of its pilot—in the ground under a farm field in France this summer.

The team used ground-penetrating radar and a photo taken by a British reconnaissance plane two days after the May, 1944
crash of the P-47 Thunderbolt flown by 1st Lt. Frank Fazekas.

 

 

 

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II.
Divers of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and Civil Defense of Grado, Italy,
prepare for an exploratory dive on the sunken B-24 bomber. 

This B-24 Liberator is the same type of airplane that
Lakewood, Ohio airman Thomas McGraw was flying in when it was shot down and crashed off the coast of Italy during World War II.

A Missing Air Crew Report details the last flight of the B-24 and nose gunner Thomas McGraw of Lakewood, Ohio.
B-24 located in Adriatic; Crewmanis bones sought Ught Lakewood Manis remains crewman Omber crew,am2-2k-28 bold Header from A1.
 

A skull fragment was recovered at the site of a wrecked B-24 bomber
off the coast of Italy that may contain the remains of
Thomas McGraw, of Lakewood, Ohio.

An underwater view of the crash site of a B-24 off Grado, Italy.

 

 

 

FINDING ENSIGN HAROLD P. DeMOSS IN THE MUCK AND MIRE

“Seeing those photos was so overwhelming that I cried like a baby”
said DeMoss’ niece, Judy Ivey. “To see this actually taking place
is not anything I ever really expected.”

Anine-person military team has been digging up mud four days a week
in the Koolau range in search of a missing World War II pilot whose
fighter crashed in cloud cover during a night training flight.

A bucket-and-pulley system was set up to move excavated
material to a spot where it can be bundled in tarps for
helicopter transport to Wheeler Army Airfield.

NOTE: The Navy’s Bureau of Medicine and Surgery said in a 1948 letter
to the family that “an attempt to recover the remains was
considered impracticable” because the site was 7 miles
from a traveled highway in the mountains.

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb. 25, 1944, Duran wasn’t supposed to be on the doomed B-24H Liberator, nicknamed “Knock it Off.”
Normally a nose turret gunner, Duran was the substitute tail turret gunner on the flight, replacing the usual tail gunner who had frostbite.

 

The earth by the headstone next to the church in this tiny mountain village was full of rocks.

 

Two days of digging under a hot sun had yielded buckets of gravel, stones the size of men’s fists and many piles of dirt – but no bones.
After 73 years, Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran was still missing.

The family feels a sense of closure regardless of the outcome, Duran said.
“What a difference it would have made to my father and to my aunt,”
she said, “to know he had died and somebody had buried him and tended the grave.”

 

 

 

Members of the recovery team attach a POW flag to the wreckage of the
Tulsamerican, a B-24 Liberator piloted by, Lt. Eugene P. Ford, a Derry Township, Pa. native,
when it crashed into the Adriatic Sea in 1944.

 

 


USS Arizona BB-39

USS Arizona was a Pennsylvania-class battleship built for and by the United States Navy in the mid-1910s. Named in honor of the 48th state's recent admission into the union, the ship was the second and last of the Pennsylvania class of "super-dreadnought" battleships. Although commissioned in 1916, the ship remained stateside during World War I. Shortly after the end of the war, Arizona was one of a number of American ships that briefly escorted President Woodrow Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference. The ship was sent to Turkey in 1919 at the beginning of the Greco-Turkish War to represent American interests for several months. Several years later, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet and remained there for the rest of her career.

Aside from a comprehensive modernization in 1929–31, 
Arizona was regularly used for training exercises between the wars, including the annual Fleet Problems (training exercises). When an earthquake struck Long Beach, California, in 1933, Arizona's crew provided aid to the survivors. Two years later, the ship was featured in a Jimmy Cagney film, Here Comes the Navy, about the romantic troubles of a sailor. In April 1940, she and the rest of the Pacific Fleet were transferred from California to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as a deterrent to Japanese imperialism.

During the 
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Arizona was bombed. After a bomb detonated in a powder magazine, the battleship exploded violently and sank, killing 1,177 officers and crewmen. Unlike many of the other ships sunk or damaged that day, Arizona was irreparably damaged by the force of the magazine explosion, though the Navy removed parts of the ship for reuse. The wreck still lies at the bottom of Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona Memorial, dedicated on 30 May 1962 to all those who died during the attack, straddles the ship's hull.

 

 

 

 

USS California BB-44

A number of other boats were sunk in the attack, but later recovered and repaired.
The USS 
California (BB-44) lost 100 crew members that morning, after the ship suffered extensive flooding damage when hit by two torpedoes on the port side.
Both torpedoes detonated below the armor belt causing virtually identical damage each time.
A 250 kg bomb also entered the starboard upper deck level, which passed through the main deck and exploded on the armored second deck,
setting off an anti-aircraft ammunition magazine and killing about 50 men.

After three days of flooding, the California settled into the mud with only her superstructure remaining above the surface.
She was later re-floated and dry-docked at Pearl Harbor for repairs. USS 
California served many missions throughout the war,
and was eventually decommissioned in February, 1947.

 

 

 

USS Cassin DD-372

On the morning of December 7, 1941, Japanese bombs fell and torpedoes slashed through the waters of Pearl Harbor,
causing a devastating amount of damage to the vessels lined up in Battleship Row in in the dry docks nearby.
Each of the seven battleships moored there suffered some degree of damage, some far worse than others.
The USS 
Arizona (BB-39) and the USS Oklahoma (BB-37) were completely destroyed. Though the Maryland (BB-46) was believed by Japan to also have been sunk, she ultimately survived and became one of the first ships to return to the war.
During the attack on Pearl Harbor, ships like the USS 
Cassin (DD-372), a Mahan-class destroyer, suffered what was originally thought to be fatal damage.
While she was extensively damaged during the attack, she was resurrected and went on to return to service during the remainder of World War II.

 

 

 

USS West Virginia BB-48

The sunken battleship USS West Virginia (BB-48) at Pearl Harbor after her fires were out, possibly on 8 December 1941.
USS Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard. A Vought OS2U Kingfisher floatplane (marked “4-O-3”) is upside down on West Virginia’s main deck.
A second OS2U is partially burned out atop the Turret No. 3 catapult. 

In the aftermath of the attacks on Pearl Harbor during World War Two stories emerged of sailors who were trapped in the sunken battleships, some even survived for weeks.

Those who were trapped underwater banged continuously on the side of the ship so that anyone would hear them and come to their rescue.
When the noises were first heard many thought it was just loose wreckage or part of the clean-up operation for the destroyed harbor.

However the day after the attack, crewmen realized that there was an eerie banging noise coming from the forward hull of the USS West Virginia, which had sunk in the harbor.

t didn’t take long for the crew and Marines based at the harbor to realize that there was nothing they could do. They could not get to these trapped sailors in time.
Months later rescue and salvage men who raised the USS West Virginia found the bodies of three men who had found an airlock in a storeroom but had eventually run out of air.

Survivors say that no one wanted to go on guard duty anywhere near the USS West Virginia since they would hear the banging of trapped survivors all night long,
but with nothing that could be done.

When salvage crews raised the battleship West Virginia six months after the Pearl Harbor attacks,
they found the bodies of three sailors huddled in an airtight storeroom —
and a calendar on which 16 days had been crossed off in
red pencil.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma BB-37 

The USS Oklahoma was on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. That was the morning that the Japanese Empire attacked the United States by surprise.

The Japanese used dive–bombers, fighter–bombers, and torpedo planes to sink nine ships, including five battleships, and severely damage 21 ships.
There were 2,402 US deaths from the attack. 1,177 of those deaths were from the USS Arizona, while 429 of the deaths were from the USS Oklahoma.

The crew of the USS Oklahoma did everything they could to fight back. In the first ten minutes of the battle, though, eight torpedoes hit the Oklahoma, and she began to capsize.  A ninth torpedo would hit her as she sunk in the mud.  14 Marines, and 415 sailors would give their lives. 32 men were cut out through the hull while the others were beneath the waterline.  Banging could be heard for over 3 days and then there was silence.

After the battle, the Navy decided that they could not salvage the Oklahoma due to how much damage she had received.  The difficult savage job began in March 1943, and Oklahoma entered dry dock 28 December. Decommissioning  September 1, 1944, Oklahoma was stripped of guns and superstructure, and sold December 5, 1946 to Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif. Oklahoma parted her tow line and sank May 17, 1947.  540 miles out, bound from Pearl Harbor to San Francisco.  Today, there is a memorial to the USS Oklahoma and the 429 sailors and marines lost on December 7, 1941, located on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

USS Oglala CM-4

The minelayer Oglala technically didn't suffer a hit on December 7, but a torpedo passed under it and hit the USS Helena
The blast from that crippled the old 
Oglala which had been built as a civilian vessel in 1906.
The crewmembers took their guns to the Navy Yard Dock and set them up to provide more defenses.
They also set up a first aid station that saved the lives of West Virginia crewmembers.

The ship suffered horribly, eventually capsizing and sinking until just a few feet of the ship's starboard side remained above water.
It was declared lost, and the Navy even considered blowing it up with dynamite to clear the dock it had sunk next to.
But the decision was made that it could destroy the dock, so the Navy had to refloat it. At that point, it made sense to dry dock and repair it.

None of the crew of Oglala were killed in the attack, although three received injuries. 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

DPAA Makes 200th Identification from USS Oklahoma Unknown Remains.
Arlington, Virginia, March 8, 2019

 


Sean Patterson, Armed Forces Medical Examiner System Department of Defense DNA Quality Management Section DNA Analyst,
replaces U. S. Navy Fireman 1st Class Billy James Johnson's picture background, signifying him as an identified service member who was previously missing in action.
Johnson marks the 200th service member to be identified following the December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor
attack where 429 U.S. Sailors and Marines were killed on the USS Oklahoma (BB-37). 

A series of large posters hang in the conference room of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency laboratory located at Offutt Air Base, Nebraska.
The heading on each of the posters states “USS OKLAHOMA.” Underneath the headings are neat rows of printed rectangular frames. 
Each one represents a person who was unaccounted for when the USS Oklahoma was sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Thanks to the work of Dr. Brown’s team, the remains of 200 previously unknown crewmen from the USS Oklahoma
have now been returned to their families for proper burial and their families have those long-awaited answers.

The story of the USS Oklahoma’s lost crewmen is an evolving history lesson that began on what
President Franklin D. Roosevelt called

“a date that will live in infamy.”

 

LIST OF USS OKLAHOMA IDENTIFICATIONS FROM MICHIGAN:
(Please note that in some USS Oklahoma identifications,
the primary next of kin has yet to be notified,
and therefore the names will not be released at this time.)

*Ensign William M. Finnegan, 44, of Bessmer, Mich.

*Seaman 1st Class Robert W. Headington, 19, of Bay City, Michigan

*Machinist's Mate 1st Class Fred M. Jones, 31, of North Lake, Michigan

*Fireman 3rd Class Gerald G. Lehman, 18, of Hancock, Michigan

*Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, 19, of Ontonagon, Michigan

It is through this effort that the accounting community
has been able to honor the sacrifices of the USS Oklahoma Sailors and Marines
and their families who pushed for the fullest possible accounting of their loved ones.

 

 

 

Ford Island is seen in this aerial view during the Japanese attack on Pearl harbor December 7, 1941 in Hawaii.
(The photo was taken from a Japanese plane.)

 

 

Remember the fallen: In all, 429 people on board the battleship were killed in the attack.
Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.

 

 

Battleship USS Oklahoma unturned hull at the bottom of Pearl Harbor
after the devastating Japanese bombing attack on Dec. 7, 1941.

 

                                                                                                                      

 

 

                                                                                                   The North Texans of Pearl Harbor
                                                                                                      

                                                                                       Their obituaries tell of lives cut short – and of lives well lived.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Memorial at Pearl Harbor

 

 

 

 

 

THE KOREAN WAR, 1950-1957

 

 

 

 

 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following WWII from MICHIGAN - 2462
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Korea from MICHIGAN - 336
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Cold War from MICHIGAN - 4
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Viet Nam from MICHIGAN - 48
 

 


 

RECENTLY FOUND
 HEROES in 2019

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
December 11, 2019

Army Pfc. William J. Winchester, 20

 Army Pfc. William J. Winchester, 20, of Mount Hope, Alabama, who was captured and died in captivity during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Winchester was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.

 He was captured by enemy forces near Unsan, North Korea in November 1950.

He reportedly died while in custody of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces at Prisoner of War Camp #5 in February 1951.

On 1954, During Operation Glory, North Korea unilaterally turned over remains to the United States, including one set, designated Unknown X-13442 Operation Glory. The remains were reportedly recovered from prisoner of war camps, United Nations cemeteries and isolated burial sites. None of the remains could be identified as Winchester and he was declared non-recoverable. The remains were subsequently buried as an unknown in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

On June 11, 2018, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency disinterred X-13442 Operation Glory and accessioned the remains to the laboratory.

To identify Winchester’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

Today, 7,604 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
December 9, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. William E. Rambo, 20

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. William E. Rambo, 20, of LaPorte, Indiana, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Rambo was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Rambo was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in Cemetery 27 on Betio Island.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa to Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Rambo, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2015, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, notified DPAA that they discovered Cemetery #27. In 2015, following continued excavations, a previously undiscovered burial trench was uncovered.
The remains were accessioned into the DPAA laboratory in February 2017.


To identify Rambo’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

Currently there are 72,632 service members still unaccounted for from World War II.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
December 5
, 2019

Navy Seaman 1st Class Orval A. Tranbarger, 20

Navy Seaman 1st Class Orval A. Tranbarger, 20, from Missouri, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official DoD release will be updated following the next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tranbarger was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Tranbarger.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
December 5
, 2019

U.S. Navy Fireman 1st Class Leo T. Keninger, 20

U.S. Navy Fireman 1st Class Leo T. Keninger, 20, Franklin CountyIowa, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official DoD release will be updated following the next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Keninger was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Keninger.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
November 27, 2019

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Riley Burchfield, 22

Army Sgt. 1st Class Riley Burchfield, 22, Cuyahoga, Ohio killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Burchfield was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was captured by enemy forces near Kunu-ri, North Korea on Nov. 26, 1950.

He reportedly died while in custody of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces at Prisoner of War Camp 5 in February 1951.

In 1954, during Operation Glory, North Korea unilaterally turned over remains to the United States, including a set designated Unknown X-13439 Operation Glory. The remains were reportedly recovered from prisoner of war camps, United Nations cemeteries and isolated burial sites. None of the remains could be identified as Burchfield and he was declared non-recoverable. The remains were subsequently buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In 2018, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency disinterred X-13439 Operation Glory as part of the Korean War Disinterment Plan and accessioned the remains to the laboratory.

To identify Burchfield’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen From World War II Accounted For
November 27, 2019

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Steve Nagy, 23

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Steve Nagy, 23, Lorain CountyOhio killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1944, Nagy was a member of the 407th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy,) 92d Bombardment Group (Heavy,) 40th Combat Bombardment Wing, 1st Air Division, 8th Air Force. On Aug. 24, 1944, Nagy piloted a B-17G Flying Fortress aircraft, carrying nine crewmembers, which was struck by German anti-aircraft fire and crashed during a bombing raid over Merseburg, Germany. Four crewmembers survived and were captured by German forces, while five, including Nagy, were killed. His remains were reported to have been buried in the Leipzig-Lindenthal Cemetery.

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) recovered three sets of remains from the Lindenthal Cemetery. One set was identified, but the other two could not be, and were subsequently designated Unknown X-1047 and X-183. In 1947, it was determined that X-1047 contained the remains of two separate individuals. They were segregated and redesignated as X-1047A and X-1047B. The three sets were then declared unidentifiable and buried as unknown American service members in American Battle Monuments Commission cemeteries in Europe.

In 2017, while studying American losses and unidentified remains recovered from outside Leipzig, Germany, a DPAA historian determined that X-1047A, X-1047B and X-183 could likely be associated with crewmembers
 from Nagy’s B-17G Flying Fortress.


In April 2019, the Department of Defense and ABMC disinterred X-1047A, X-1047B and X-183 and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory.

To identify Nagy’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 27, 2019

Navy Quartermaster 2nd Class Daryle E. Artley, 21

Navy Quartermaster 2nd Class Daryle E. Artley, 21, Haywood, Nebraska killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Artley was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Artley.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Artley.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Artley’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR)
and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 27, 2019

Army Master Sgt. Harold F. Drews, 21

Army Master Sgt. Harold F. Drews, 21, Illinois killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In December 1950, Drews was assigned to King Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. For several days, his unit was engaged in intense fighting with the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces
near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea.

 Drews went missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950. His remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 27, 2019

Navy Chief Water Tender Francis D. Day, 37

Navy Chief Water Tender Francis D. Day, 37, of Milburn, New Jersey, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Day was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Day.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Day.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Day’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
November 26, 2019

U.S. Army Air Forces Tech. Sgt. Charles G. Ruble, 20

U.S. Army Air Forces Tech. Sgt. Charles G. Ruble, 20, of Parker City, Indiana, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In September 1944, Ruble was a member of the 99th Troop Carrier Squadron, 441st Troop Carrier Group, serving as an aerial engineer aboard a C-47A aircraft, nicknamed the Celia L. On September 17, 1944, the Celia L, which operated out of U.S. Army Air Forces Station 490, Langar, Nottinghamshire, England, participated in Operation MARKET GARDEN, the Allied invasion of the German-occupied Netherlands. The aircraft was carrying a crew of five and transporting 10 paratroopers from the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment to a drop-zone near Groesbeek, Netherlands. Anti-aircraft fire struck the plane’s wing and ignited its gas tanks. The paratroopers successfully exited the plane, as did two of the crewmembers. The pilot crash landed the plane several hundred yards inside the German border. Three crewmembers survived, but two, including Ruble, could not be accounted for and were believed to have been killed in the crash.

In April 1946, members of the 606th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company recovered eight sets of remains from isolated burials near Zyfflich, Germany, close to the Netherlands border. One set of remains, designated X-2565 Neuville, was buried about 500 yards from a downed C-47 aircraft in a grave marked with an uninscribed wooden cross. U.S. authorities interred X-2565 at what is today the Ardennes American Cemetery in Belgium after they had been declared unidentifiable.

After thorough research and analysis, historians from DPAA determined that Ruble was a strong candidate for association with X-2565. In June 2018, X-2565 was disinterred and the remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for analysis.

To identify Ruble’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 26, 2019

Navy Fire Controlman 3rd Class Adolph J. Loebach, 22

Navy Fire Controlman 3rd Class Adolph J. Loebach, 22, of Peru, Illinois, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Loebach was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Loebach.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Loebach.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Loebach’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 25
, 2019

Navy Fireman 1st Class Lawrence E. Woods, 28

Navy Fireman 1st Class Lawrence E. Woods, 28, of Greenwood, Texas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Woods was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Woods.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Woods.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Woods’ remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 25, 2019

Army Cpl. Gerald N. Wilson, 19

Army Cpl. Gerald N. Wilson, 19, of Camden, Missouri, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1950, Wilson was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was last seen July 25, 1950, while participating in the defense of Yongdong, South Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

Following the war, the 565th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company recovered a set of remains, designated Unknown X-1044 Tanggok from Ulgok, South Korea. The remains were declared unidentifiable and were subsequently buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

On June 11, 2018, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency disinterred X-1044 Tanggok and accessioned the remains to the laboratory.

To identify Wilson’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 25, 2019

Army Pvt. William D. Hedtke, 28

U.S. Army Pvt. William D. Hedtke, 28, of Iola, Wisconsin, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In 1944, Hedtke was assigned to Battery B, 319th Glider Artillery Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division. Army officials reported he died of injuries sustained in a hard glider landing near Groesbeek, Netherlands, during Operation Market Garden on Sept. 18, 1944. His remains were not recovered after the war.

In June 1945, Canadian graves registration personnel recovered a set of American remains near Groesbeek that were given to the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC). After unsuccessful efforts by the AGRC to identify the remains, they were designated X-1230 Margraten and interred as an Unknown at the Netherlands American Cemetery.

In 2016, DPAA disinterred X-1230 to be scientifically analyzed for possible association to an Operation Market Garden casualty.

To identify Hedtke’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosomal (Y-STR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS West Virginia Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 25, 2019

Navy Fireman 1st Class Bethel E. Walters, 25

Navy Fireman 1st Class Bethel E. Walters, 25, of Bellevue, Texas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Walters was assigned to the battleship USS West Virginia, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS West Virginia sustained multiple torpedo hits, but timely counter-flooding measures taken by the crew prevented it from capsizing, and it came to rest on the shallow harbor floor. The attack resulted in the deaths of 106 crewmen, including Walters.

During efforts to salvage the USS West Virginia, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crewmen, representing at least 66 individuals. Those who could not be identified, including Walters, were interred as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

From June through October 2017, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, in cooperation with cemetery officials, disinterred 35 caskets, reported to be associated with the USS West Virginia, from the Punchbowl and transferred the remains to the laboratory for identification.

To identify Walters’ remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR), and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Nelson Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 22, 2019

 Navy Seaman 1st Class Stewart Jordan, 20,

 Navy Seaman 1st Class Stewart Jordan, 20, of Coeburn, Virginia, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In 1944, Jordan was assigned to the USS Nelson, which was anchored off the coast of Normandy, France. He was killed June 12, 1944, when the ship was hit by enemy fire. Following the war, his remains could not be identified.

On Nov. 3, 1944, a graves registration team learned of remains that had washed ashore on “Roger White Beach,” in Normandy. The remains were noted to have a tattoo on the arm, depicting the sinking of the USS Tucker, where Jordan had been assigned prior to its sinking in August 1942. The remains were declared unidentifiable and designated as Unknown X-144 Sainte-Mère-Église #2, and were subsequently interred in what is now the Normandy American Cemetery. Of the 13 crew members unaccounted for from the USS Nelson, two previously served on the USS Tucker, including Jordan.

In September 2018, DPAA and the American Battle Monuments Commission exhumed X-144 and accessioned the remains to the laboratory.

To identify Jordan’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 22, 2019

Navy Fireman 1st Class Rex E. Wise, 21

Navy Fireman 1st Class Rex E. Wise, 21, Braman Kay County Oklahoma killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Wise was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wise.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 21, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Edward A. Nalazek, 27

Marine Corps Pfc. Edward A. Nalazek, 27, of Chicago, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Nalazek was a member of Company D, 2nd Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Nalazek was killed on the second day of the battle, Nov. 21, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in the Central Division Cemetery 8th Marines #2 on Betio Island.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company (604th GRC) centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa to Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Nalazek, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In June 1967, construction at the site of the Marine/Customs office block at the Betio Wharf uncovered multiple sets of remains, as well as American equipment. The remains were sent to the U.S. Army Mortuary at Tachikawa Air Base, Japan, and accessioned as Unknown XJ-1323. A number of remains were identified as Japanese. However, XJ-1323A-G were determined to be American. The remains could not be identified, and were subsequently buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In 2015, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, excavated a site near the wharf on Betio Island, later identified as Cemetery 27. Remains recovered were accessioned to the DPAA laboratory.

On Nov. 21, 2016, DPAA disinterred XJ-1323 from the Punchbowl, and associated portions of XJ-1323B with portions recovered by History Flight in 2015.

To identify Nalazek’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 21, 2019

Navy Fireman 1st Class Andrew J. Schmitz, 22

Navy Fireman 1st Class Andrew J. Schmitz, 22, Henrico County, Virginia, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Schmitz was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Schmitz.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
November 21, 2019

Army Cpl. Wilfred K. Hussey, Jr.

Army Cpl. Wilfred K. Hussey, Jr., 19, Hilo - Big Island, Hawaii killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Hussey was a member of Company K, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 12, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on
Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Hussey’s remains, scientists from DPAA used circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA),
Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
November 21, 2019

Army Cpl. Asa E. Vance,

Army Cpl. Asa (Bud) E. Vance, 18, Decatur, Illinois killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Vance was a member of Company D, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action Dec. 2, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, on Aug. 1, 2018,
and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Vance’s remains, scientists from DPAA used circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA),
Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) and analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 21, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Alfred Edwards, 33

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Alfred Edwards, 33 of Stilwell, Oklahoma, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Edwards was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

 Edwards was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in the East Division Cemetery, later renamed Cemetery 33 on Betio Island.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company (604th GRC) centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa to Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found.

No recovered remains could be associated with Edwards, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.” The remains that could not be identified, were subsequently buried in the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, including two sets, designated Tarawa Unknown X-203 and X-209.


On March 27, 2017, DPAA disinterred X-203 from the Punchbowl, and on April 3, 2017, DPAA disinterred X-209. The remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis,
where anthropologists determined X-203 and X-209 were associated with each other.


To identify Edwards’ remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.
Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS West Virginia Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 20, 2019

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Welborn L. Ashby, 24

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Welborn L. Ashby, 24, of Louisville, Kentucky, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(This official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Ashby was assigned to the battleship USS West Virginia, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The ship sustained multiple torpedo hits, but timely counter-flooding measures taken by the crew prevented it from capsizing, and it came to rest on the shallow harbor floor.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 106 crewmen, including Ashby.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 20, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. John R. Bayens,

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. John R. Bayens, 20, of Louisville, Kentucky, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Bayens was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands in an attempt to secure the island.
Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Bayens was killed on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in Cemetery 33 on Betio Island.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Bayens, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2014, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, identified Cemetery 33. Excavations of the site uncovered multiple sets of remains, which were turned over to DPAA in 2015.

To identify Bayens’ remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological, and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
November 20, 2019

U.S. Army Sgt. Maximiano T. Lacsamana, 37

U.S. Army Sgt. Maximiano T. Lacsamana, 37, of the Philippines, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(This official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Lacsamana, a veteran of the Philippine Scouts during World War II, was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division.

 His unit was engaged in intense fighting with the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces near Hagaru-ri, North Korea. He was reported missing in action Dec. 3, 1950.

Following the war, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
August 13, 2019

Army Pfc. Wilbur T. Tackett, 18

Army Pfc. Wilbur T. Tackett, 18, of Alger, Ohio, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Tackett was a member of Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, when enemy forces attacked his unit near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. His remains could not be recovered following the attack.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018,
and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

Awarded Purple Heart, Korean Service Medal, United Nations Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.


To identify Tackett’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 20, 2019

Navy Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Arnold M. Nielsen,

Navy Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Arnold M. Nielsen, 32, of Oakland, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Nielsen was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Nielsen.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Nielsen.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Nielsen’s remains, scientists from DPAA used circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
November 20, 2019

Army Cpl. Autrey J. Betar,

Army Cpl. Autrey J. Betar, 18, of Port Arthur, Texas, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Betar was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, 31st Regimental Combat Team.
He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.


North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam,
Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Betar’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
November 14, 2019

U.S. Army Air Forces Tech. Sgt. Max. W. Lower, 23

U.S. Army Air Forces Tech. Sgt. Max. W. Lower, 23, of Lewiston, Utah, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1943, Lower was assigned to the 345th Bombardment Squadron, 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force. On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24 aircraft on which Lower was the radio operator crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation Tidal Wave, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti, north of Bucharest, Romania.

Following the operation, the Romanian government reported they had recovered 216 Americans killed in the raid, 27 of whom were identifiable. His remains were not among the 27. Those not identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Command, the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel, disinterred all American remains from the Bolovan Cemetery for identification.
Each unidentified set of remains was designated Unknown and reinterred into the American Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium.


In 2017, DPAA began exhuming unknowns believed to be associated with unaccounted for airmen from Operation Tidal Wave losses.
That year, 15 sets of remains were disinterred and sent to the laboratory for analysis.


To identify Lower’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
November 13, 2019

Army Cpl. Joe T. Avant, 20


Army Cpl. Joe T. Avant, 20, of Greenwood, Mississippi, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Avant was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, 31st Regimental Combat Team. He was reported missing in action Nov. 30, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.


 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War.

The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Avant’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) and analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
November 7, 2019

Army Cpl. Kenneth E. Ford, 18

Army Cpl. Kenneth E. Ford, 18, of Albia, Iowa, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Ford was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii
on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Ford’s remains, scientists from DPAA used circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 7, 2019

Army Pfc. Karl L. Dye, 17

Army Pfc. Karl L. Dye, 17, of Marion, Ohio, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In July 1950, Dye was a member of Battery B, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against Democratic People’s Republic of Korea forces near Taejon, South Korea.
According to a witness, he was seriously wounded by an enemy mortar shell and placed in an ambulance. The ambulance allegedly encountered an enemy roadblock.

Dye was reported missing in action on July 16, 1950.

In October 1950, one set of remains, designated “Unknown X-159 Taejon,” was recovered in the vicinity of Taejon. Despite several attempts, the remains could not be identified and were subsequently sent to the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, where they were buried as an Unknown.


On Oct. 16, 2017, Unknown X-159 was disinterred from the Punchbowl and sent to the DPAA laboratory.

To identify Dye’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as and circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally,
scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 7, 2019

Army Cpl. Leon E. Clevenger, 21

Army Cpl. Leon E. Clevenger, 21, of Durham, North Carolina, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1950, Clevenger was an infantryman with Company K, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on July 11, 1950, while involved in combat operations
against the North Korean People’s Army in the vicinity of Chonui and Choch’iwon, South Korea.

The Army amended his status to deceased in December 1953 when there was no updated information regarding his status.

In November 1951, a U.S. Army Graves Registration Team recovered the remains of an unidentified American near the village of Kalgo-ri, approximately three miles from Clevenger’s last known location.
The remains were taken to the United States Military Cemetery Tanggok for possible identification, and were later sent to the Central Identification Unit at Kokura, Japan, as Unknown X-2258 Tanggok for further processing.

The remains, which could not be identified, were subsequently buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In December 2018, the Department of Defense disinterred X-2258 and sent the remains to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Clevenger’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 6, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Jack B. Van Zandt,

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Jack B. Van Zandt, 21, Rossville, Illinois killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Van Zandt was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Van Zandt was killed on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in East Division Cemetery on Betio Island.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found.

No recovered remains could be associated with Van Zandt, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2014, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, located a site correlated with Cemetery 33. Excavations of the site uncovered multiple sets of remains, which were turned over to DPAA in 2015,
where they were subsequently accessioned to the laboratory.


To identify Van Zandt’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as material evidence.

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 6, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Michael Kocopy, 20


Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Michael Kocopy, 20, of Gardendale, Pennsylvania, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Kocopy was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Kocopy was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in the Central Division Cemetery on Betio Island.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa to Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. However, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be associated with Kocopy, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2014, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, identified a site correlated with Cemetery 26. Excavations of the site uncovered multiple sets of remains, which were turned over to DPAA in 2015,
where they were subsequently accessioned to the DPAA laboratory.


To identify Kocopy’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally,
scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 6
, 2019

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Herbert B. Jacobson, 21

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Herbert B. Jacobson, 21, of Chicago, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Jacobson was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Jacobson.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 4, 2019

Army Pfc. Harold K. Knight, 20

Army Pfc. Harold K. Knight, 20, of Erie, Pennsylvania, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late November 1950, Knight was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 31st Regimental Combat Team. For several days, his unit was engaged in intense fighting with the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces at Sinhung-ri, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea.

The RCT endured repeated attacks before withdrawing Dec. 1, 1950. When the unit leaders conducted a muster of returning personnel, Knight was not among the group. Witness accounts stated that Knight was killed in action Nov. 25, 1950.
His remains could not be recovered.


 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018,
and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Knight’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 4
, 2019

Marine Corps Cpl. Thomas H. Cooper, 22

 Marine Corps Cpl. Thomas H. Cooper, 22, of Omaha, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In November 1943, Cooper was a member of Company A, 2nd Amphibious Tractor Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio
 in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Cooper died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 4, 2019

Army 1st Lt. George S. Crisp, 24

Army 1st Lt. George S. Crisp, 24, of Alba, Texas, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Crisp was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. His unit was engaged in intense fighting with the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces at Sinhung-ri, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. He was reported to have last been seen near Hagaru-ri, but his remains could not be located. The U.S. Army declared Crisp deceased as of Dec. 12, 1950.
 

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018,
and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Crisp’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System
used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 4
, 2019

Army Pvt. Horace H. Middleton, 20

Army Pvt. Horace H. Middleton, 20, of Northumberland, Pennsylvania, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In the spring and summer of 1944, Middleton was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), also known as Merrill’s Marauders, as an infantryman in the China-Burma-India Theater.

 After taking the airfield in Myitkyina, Burma, from the Japanese on May 17, Middleton’s battalion was tasked with holding the airfield and taking part in the siege of Myitkyina. Middleton was killed during fighting on Jul 12.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 4, 2019

Army Cpl. Earl W. Duncan, 23

Army Cpl. Earl W. Duncan, 23, of McAdenville, North Carolina, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Duncan was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, 31st Regimental Combat Team. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir,
North Korea, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.


North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018,
and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Duncan’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 1
, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Harry C. Morrissey, 27

Marine Corps Pfc. Harry C. Morrissey, 27, of Everett, Massachusetts, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On October 9, 1942, Morrissey was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, participating in a main offensive action in the Battle of Guadalcanal. After nearly two months of battle, the regiment completed their action. However, due to rapid unit movement, Marines who had been killed in action were buried hastily.

Morrissey and two other Marines from his battalion were reportedly interred in graves atop Hill 73.

From 1947 through 1949, the American Graves Registration Service searched for isolated burials on Guadalcanal, but did not associate any remains with Morrissey. Based on the lack of information, Morrissey was declared non-recoverable.

In 2011, Yorick Tokuru, a resident of Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, located possible remains near his home on the western edge of Skyline Ridge (Hill 73). A team of Royal Solomon Islands Police Force investigators excavated the site and turned recovered remains over to the state archaeologist. The archaeologist turned the remains over to John Innes, an Australian expert on the Battle of Guadalcanal, who in turn contacted the Joint POW/MIA Recovery Command (JPAC, the predecessor unit to DPAA).

On July 12, 2013, Ewan Stevenson, a Guadalcanal native living in New Zealand, contacted JPAC stating more remains had been recovered near the site of the 2011 recovery location.

On August 6, 2013, the remains were unilaterally turned over to JPAC for identification.

To identify Morrissey’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 1, 2019

Army Sgt. Walter H. Tobin, Jr. 22

Army Sgt. Walter H. Tobin, Jr., 22, of Glen Lake, Michigan, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Tobin was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, 31st Regimental Combat Team.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when enemy forces attacked his unit near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. His remains could not be recovered following the attack.

North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018,
and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Tobin’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 1
, 2019

Army Pfc. Eugene E. Lochowicz, 19

Army Pfc. Eugene E. Lochowicz, 19, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In early 1945, Lochowicz was a member of Company A, 28th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division. On Feb. 23, 1945, he went missing while his unit crossed the Roer River under fire, near Lendersdorf, Germany.
Members of his unit later concluded that he had been lost when one of the boats capsized. All efforts to find him were unsuccessful.


After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, was the unit tasked with investigation and recovery of missing American personnel. In February 1949, AGRC investigators were in the area where Lochowicz was lost, but were unsuccessful in finding his remains.

In 2017, in response to inquiries from Lochowicz’s family regarding unknown remains recovered around Lendersdorf, a DPAA historian reviewed documents of X-285 Margraten, which had been pulled from the river near where Lochowicz went missing. The remains, which could not be identified when they were found in 1945, had subsequently been buried at the United States Military Cemetery at Margraten, Netherlands. Based upon the location and circumstances of recovery, the DPAA historian concluded that Lochowicz was a likely candidate for association.

In September 2018, the Department of Defense and American Battle Monuments Commission disinterred X-285 and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Lochowicz’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 1
, 2019

U.S. Naval Reserve Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Paul H. Gebser, 39

U.S. Naval Reserve Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Paul H. Gebser, 39, of San Diego, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Gebser was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

He was killed in the attack, and while his remains were recovered from the ship following the incident, they could not be individually identified at the time.
MM1 Gebser was initially buried as an unknown at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Gebser.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 1
, 2019

U.S. Naval Reserve Ensign Frances C. Flaherty, 22

 U.S. Naval Reserve Ensign Frances C. Flaherty, 22, of CharlotteMichigan. , killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

He was a parishioner at St. Mary's Catholic Church while living in Charlotte. He enlisted in the Naval Reserve in July 1940 and was commissioned as an Ensign in December of that year.
On Dec. 7, 1941, Flaherty was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The Oklahoma was based at Pearl Harbor for patrols and exercises, and was moored in Battleship Row when the attack began. Almost immediately after the first Japanese bombs fell, the ship was hit by three torpedoes and began to capsize. Those who could began to abandon ship as more torpedoes struck home. Ensign Flaherty remained in one of the ship's turrets, providing light so that the turret crew could escape. When the Oklahoma rolled completely over, he was trapped inside the hull along with many others. Thirty-two crewmembers of the Oklahoma were rescued from inside the hull over the next few days, but Ensign Flaherty was not among them.

 The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Flaherty.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 1
, 2019

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Lloyd R. Timm, 19

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Lloyd R. Timm, 19, of Minneapolis, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Timm was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Timm.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 31, 2019

Army Sgt. William C. Holmes, 21

Army Sgt. William C. Holmes, 21, of Smyth County, Virginia, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In 1951, Holmes was a member of Heavy Tank Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. On Sept. 21, 1951, his unit participated in a patrol located near the Iron Triangle, North Korea. After a prolonged firefight,
Holmes was killed in action. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.


On Nov. 1, 1951, an unidentified set of remains, designated X-2162, were turned over to the 19th Infantry Regiment’s collection point. The remains could not be identified and were subsequently buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In 2018, DPAA disinterred X-2162 and accessioned the remains to the laboratory.

To identify Holmes’ remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 30, 2019

U.S. Navy Seaman 2nd Class Everett G. Windle, 20

U.S. Navy Seaman 2nd Class Everett G. Windle, 20, of Kansas City, Missouri, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Windle was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Windle.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 30, 2019

Army Pfc. Jasper V. Marquez,

Army Pfc. Jasper V. Marquez, 21, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Marquez was assigned to Company L, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action Nov. 28, 1950, when enemy forces attacked his unit near Kujang-dong, North Korea.

After the war, a returned prisoner of war reported that Marquez died Jan. 20, 1951, while being held as a prisoner of war. His remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War.
The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Marquez’ remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally,
scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 30, 2019

Navy Coxswain Layton T. Banks, 20

Navy Coxswain Layton T. Banks, 20, of Dallas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Banks was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Banks.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 30, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert J. Hatch, 21

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert J. Hatch, 21, of Woods Cross, Utah, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Hatch was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands in an attempt to secure the island.
Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Hatch was killed on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in either an isolated burial or in Cemetery 33 on Betio Island.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found.
No recovered remains could be associated with Hatch, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”


In 2014, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, identified a site correlated with Cemetery 33. Excavations of the site uncovered multiple sets of remains, which were turned over to DPAA in 2015.

To identify Hatch’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological, and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as material evidence.
DPAA is grateful to the United States Marine Corps for their assistance in this mission. Additionally, DPAA is appreciative to History Flight, Inc., for their partnership in this mission.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 29, 2019

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Jerome B. Morris, 22

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Jerome B. Morris, 22, of Paragould, Arkansas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In November 1943, Morris was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio
in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Morris was killed on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943.

 

 

 

 

Marine Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 29, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Billy E. Johnson, 21

Marine Corps Pfc. Billy E. Johnson, 21, of White Oak, Texas, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Johnson was a member of the 1st Marine Division, attached to the U.S. Army’s 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 30, 1950, after the enemy attacked his unit near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Johnson’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 29, 2019

U.S. Army Pvt. Porfirio C. Franco, Jr., 22

U.S. Army Pvt. Porfirio C. Franco, Jr., 22, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, who was captured and died in captivity during World War II, was accounted for.

In 1942, Franco was a member of the 200th Coast Artillery Regiment, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands. Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on April 9, 1942, and of Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942.

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were captured and interned at POW camps. Franco was among those reported captured after the surrender of Corregidor and held at the Cabanatuan POW camp.
More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the war.


According to prison camp and other historical records, Franco died July 18, 1942, and was buried along with other deceased prisoners in the local Cabanatuan Camp Cemetery, in common grave number 312.

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to a temporary U.S. military mausoleum near Manila. In late 1947, the AGRS examined the remains in an attempt to identify them. Due to the circumstances of the POW deaths and burials, the extensive commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of the remains could not be individually identified. The unidentified remains were interred as “unknowns” in the present-day Manila American Cemetery and Memorial.

In January 2018, 23 “unknown” remains associated with Common Grave 312 were disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis, including one set, designated X-2841 Manila Cemetery #2.

To identify Franco’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 29, 2019

Army Cpl. Herman R. Phy,


Army Cpl. Herman R. Phy, 18, of Philadelphia, Pa. killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1953, Phy was an infantryman assigned to Company A, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 17th Infantry Division. He was reported missing on July 6, 1953, when he could not be accounted for by his unit in the vicinity of Hill 255, Pork Chop Hill, North Korea.

In 1993, North Korea unilaterally turned over 33 boxes of remains as part of a larger group of 208 boxes, known as K-208. With that turnover, nine boxes were reported to have been recovered from Kundong-ni, Kimhwa County, Kangwon Province.

To identify Phy’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 29, 2019

Army Cpl. Norvin D. Brockett, 18

Army Cpl. Norvin D. Brockett, 18, of Crook, Oregon, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In December 1950, Brockett was a member of Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, 31st Regimental Combat Team. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

His remains could not be recovered following the attack and he was not reported as a prisoner of war. The U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Brockett’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 29, 2019

Marine Corps Pvt. Edwin F. Benson,


Marine Corps Pvt. Edwin F. Benson, 22, of West Newton, Massachusetts, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Benson was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Benson was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943. He was reported to have been buried in the East Division Cemetery, which was eventually renamed to Cemetery #33.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

Between 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Benson’s remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory for identification in 1947. By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred as unknowns in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, including one set, designated as Tarawa Unknown X-155.

On Jan. 30, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-155 from the Punchbowl for identification.

To identify Benson’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 28, 2019

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Brady O. Prewitt,

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Brady O. Prewitt, 20, of Liberal, Missouri, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Prewitt was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Prewitt.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Prewitt.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Prewitt’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 28
, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Ray P. Fairchild,

Marine Corps Pfc. Ray P. Fairchild, 21, of Salyersville, Kentucky, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Fairchild was a member of Company D, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. He was killed in action Nov. 27, 1950, near the town of Yudam-ni, west of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the war his remains could not be recovered.

In 1954, during Operation Glory, North Korea and the United States Command exchanged the remains of casualties. One set of remains, designated Unknown X-13474 Yudam-ni could not be identified and were subsequently buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

On May 11, 2012, the Joint Personnel Accounting Command (a predecessor to DPAA) disinterred X-13474 Yunam-ni and accessioned the remains to the laboratory.

To identify Fairchild’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.
DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs and the United States Marine Corps for their partnership in this mission.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 25, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Channing R. Whitaker, 18

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Channing R. Whitaker, 18, of Granger, Iowa, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Whitaker was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Whitaker died on the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943. He was reported to have been buried in the East Division Cemetery, which was eventually renamed Cemetery #33.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found.

 No recovered remains could be associated with Whitaker, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed to be missing American service members who had been buried in Cemetery #33. In March 2019, following continued excavations, a previously undiscovered burial trench was uncovered. The remains were accessioned into the DPAA laboratory.

To identify Whitaker’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed  During the Korean War Accounted For
October 25, 2019

Army Cpl. Henry L. Phillips, 18

Army Cpl. Henry L. Phillips, 18, of Giles, Tennessee, who was captured and died in captivity during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Phillips was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action Nov. 28, 1950, in the vicinity of Anju, North Korea, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces. Following the war, returning American prisoners of war reported that Phillips had been captured and died at Prisoner of War Camp #5, on March 17, 1951.

In September 1954, during Operation Glory, North Korea returned remains reportedly recovered from Pyoktong, also known as Prisoner of War Camp 5, to the United Nations Command.

One set of remains, Unknown X-13491, could not be identified and was buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

On June 11, 2018, the Department of Defense disinterred Unknown X-13491 and sent the remains to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Phillips’ remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 25, 2019

Army Cpl. William L. Brown, 18

Army Cpl. William L. Brown, 18, of Benton, Illinois, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(Official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Brown was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action Dec. 2, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea,
when his unit was attacked by enemy forces.

 Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 25, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Joseph R. Livermore, 21

Marine Corps Pfc. Joseph R. Livermore, 21, of Bakersfield, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Livermore was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Livermore was killed around the third day of the battle, Nov. 22, 1943. He was reported to have been buried in the East Division Cemetery, which was eventually renamed to Cemetery #33.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company (604th GRC) centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa to Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found. No recovered remains could be identified as Livermore, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed to be missing American service members who had been buried in Cemetery #33. In March 2019, following continued excavations, a previously undiscovered burial trench was uncovered. The remains were accessioned into the DPAA laboratory.

To identify Livermore’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 25, 2019

Army Pfc. Lawrence E. Worthen,

Army Pfc. Lawrence E. Worthen, 20, of Santa Ana, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In 1944, Worthen was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Sept. 17, 1944, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces near Wettlingen, Germany.
His remains could not be recovered after the attack.


After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC,) U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps was the unit tasked with investigation and recovery of missing American personnel. The AGRC collected thousands of unknown remains from across northern Europe. A mass grave of several 112th Infantry Soldiers had been found near Wettlingen, and most were identified through identification tags or personal effects. However two sets, processed through the American cemetery at Hamm, Luxembourg, designated X-70 Hamm and X-71 Hamm, were declared unidentifiable, and subsequently buried in the Luxembourg American Cemetery as Unknowns.

In 2017, while studying American losses and unidentified remains recovered from combat around Wettlingen, Germany, a DPAA historian reviewed documents of X-71 Hamm, and determined that there were five unresolved American casualties who were last known to have been lost in combat near Wettlingen, including Worthen.

In April 2019, the Department of Defense and American Battle Monuments Commission disinterred X-71 Hamm and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Worthen’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological analysis and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
October 24, 2019

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Willard R. Best, 24

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Willard R. Best, 24, Macon County, Illinois killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1944, Best was a member of the 407th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 92d Bombardment Group (Heavy), 40th Combat Bombardment Wing, 1st Air Division, 8th Air Force. On Aug. 24, 1944, Best was the top turret gunner aboard a B-17G Flying Fortress aircraft, carrying nine crewmembers, which was struck by German anti-aircraft fire and crashed during a bombing raid over Merseburg, Germany.

Four crewmembers survived and were captured by German forces, while five, including Best, were killed. His remains were reported to have been buried in the Leipzig-Lindenthal Cemetery.

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command recovered three sets of remains from the Lindenthal Cemetery. One set was identified, but the other two could not be, and were subsequently designated Unknown X-1047 and X-183. In 1947, it was determined that X-1047 contained the remains of two separate individuals. They were segregated and redesignated as X-1047A and X-1047B.

The three sets were then declared unidentifiable and buried as unknown American service members in American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) cemeteries in Europe.

In 2017, while studying American losses and unidentified remains recovered from outside Leipzig, Germany, a DPAA historian determined that X-1047A, X-1047B and X-183 could likely be associated with crewmembers from Best’s B-17G Flying Fortress.

In April 2019, the Department of Defense and ABMC disinterred X-1047A, X-1047B and X-183 and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Best’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 24, 2019

Army Cpl. Lloyd B. Odom, 19

Army Cpl. Lloyd B. Odom, 19, of Odessa, Missouri, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Odom was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, 31st Regimental Combat Team. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018,
and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Odom’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 23, 2019

Army Cpl. Charles H. Grubb, 21

Army Cpl. Charles H. Grubb, 21, of War Eagle, West Virginia, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Grubb was a member of Company M, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950, after the enemy attacked his unit near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.
 Immediately after the battle Grubb was declared missing in action and a few months later, he was officially determined to have been killed in action. His remains were not recovered.


 North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un in June 2018, North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Grubb’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
October 23, 2019

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. John F. McTigue, 22

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. John F. McTigue, 22, of Astoria, New York, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1944, McTigue was a member of the 407th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy,) 92d Bombardment Group (Heavy,) 40th Combat Bombardment Wing, 1st Air Division, 8th Air Force. On Aug. 24, 1944, McTigue co-piloted a B-17G Flying Fortress aircraft, carrying nine crewmembers, which was struck by German anti-aircraft fire and crashed during a bombing raid over Merseburg, Germany. Four crewmembers survived and were captured by German forces, while five, including McTigue, were killed. His remains were reported to have been buried in the Leipzig-Lindenthal Cemetery.

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) recovered three sets of remains from the Lindenthal Cemetery. One set was identified, but the other two could not be, and were subsequently designated Unknown X-1047 and X-183. In 1947, it was determined that X-1047 contained the remains of two separate individuals. They were segregated and redesignated as X-1047A and X-1047B. The three sets were then declared unidentifiable and buried as unknown American service members in American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) cemeteries in Europe.

In 2017, while studying American losses and unidentified remains recovered from outside Leipzig, Germany, a DPAA historian determined that X-1047A, X-1047B and X-183 could likely be associated with crewmembers from McTigue’s B-17G Flying Fortress.

In April 2019, the Department of Defense and ABMC disinterred X-1047A, X-1047B and X-183 and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory for identification.
To identify McTigue’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 23, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve 2nd Lt. Ernest A. Matthews, Jr., 34,

Marine Corps Reserve 2nd Lt. Ernest A. Matthews, Jr., 34, of Dallas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Matthews was assigned to Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, Division Special Troops, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Matthews died on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in Cemetery 33.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all of the American remains found on Tarawa to Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation; however, almost half of the known casualties were never found.
No recovered remains could be associated with Matthews, and in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”


In June 2015, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, unearthed multiple sets of remains who had been buried on Betio. The remains were turned over to DPAA.

To identify Matthews’ remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological, and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 22, 2019

Army Pvt. Connie Cagle, 23

Army Pvt. Connie Cagle, 23, of Sweetwater, Tennessee, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In late 1942, Cagle was a member of Company K, 126th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division, when his unit was engaged with enemy forces along the Soputa-Sanananda Track, near Buna, in the Australian Territory of Papua (present-day Papua New Guinea). Cagle was killed in action on Nov. 22, 1942.

On Jan. 16, 1943, the remains of an unidentified American Soldier, designated X-81, were interred at the U.S. Temporary Cemetery Soputa #2. On April 3, 1943, the remains were moved to U.S. Temporary Cemetery Soputa #1.

In 1947, the American Graves Registration service exhumed approximately 11,000 sets of remains, including X-81, which was redesignated as X-1568, and sent to the Central Identification Point at the Manila Mausoleum in the Philippines. X-1568 could not be identified and was interred at Fort McKinley (now the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial.)

On Feb. 24, 2017, Unknown X-1568 was disinterred, and the remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Cagle’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 22, 2019

Navy Fire Controlman 3rd Class Victor P. Tumlinson, 18

Navy Fire Controlman 3rd Class Victor P. Tumlinson, 18, Willacy, Texas killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Tumlinson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Tumlinson.

Fire Controlman Petty Officer Third Class Victor Patrick Tumlinson, who joined the U.S. Navy in Texas, was serving aboard the Oklahoma at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack. His remains could not be identified following the incident and he is still unaccounted-for. Today, Petty Officer Tumlinson is memorialized on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Tumlinson's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 21, 2019

Army Sgt. 1st Class Phillip C. Mendoza,


Army Sgt. 1st Class Phillip C. Mendoza, 27, of Anthony, New Mexico, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Mendoza was an artilleryman with Battery D, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team. He was reported missing in action Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit engaged against enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. His remains could not be recovered following the battle.

North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.
To identify Mendoza’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 21, 2019

Army Cpl. Gudmund C. Johnson, Jr. 22

Army Cpl. Gudmund C. Johnson, Jr., 22, of Red Wing, Minnesota, who was captured and died in captivity during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In November 1950, Johnson was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was captured by enemy forces on Nov. 28, 1950, near Unsan, North Korea, and held at Prisoner of War Camp 5,

 He reportedly died while a prisoner of war at Camp #5, where he was held by the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces. Following his death, his remains could not be recovered.

In September 1954, during Operation Glory, North Korea returned remains reportedly recovered from Pyoktong, also known as Prisoner of War Camp 5, to the United Nations Command. One set of remains, Unknown X-14693, could not be identified and were buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In April 2018, the Department of Defense disinterred X-14693 and sent the remains to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Johnson’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 21, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Joseph F. Boschetti, 23

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Joseph F. Boschetti, 23, of Philadelphia, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Boschetti was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Boschetti died on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. The 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947, but Boschetti’s remains were not identified. All of the remains found on Tarawa were sent to the Schofield Barracks Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii for identification in 1947. By 1949, the remains that had not been identified were interred as unknowns in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, including one set, designated as Tarawa Unknown X-020.

On Jan. 9, 2017, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-020 from the Punchbowl for identification.

To identify Boschetti’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 21, 2019

Army Sgt. Robert W. McCarville, 24

 Army Sgt. Robert W. McCarville, 24, of Beloit, Wisconsin, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In December 1942, McCarville was a member of Company L, 128th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division. He was killed in action on Dec. 5, 1942, during an assault against enemy positions near Cape Endaiadere, Duropa Plantation,
Territory of Papua. Due to intense enemy fire, his unit was unable to recover his remains.


In 1945, a platoon leader from McCarville’s company recalled that McCarville’s remains were recovered Dec. 18, 1942, and he was buried in a temporary grave near where he was killed.

The platoon leader said that in January 1943, a burial detail disinterred McCarville’s remains and transferred them to a small cemetery on the beach at Cape Endaiadere.

On Jan. 6, 1943, the remains of an unidentified American Soldier were interred at the U.S. Duropa Plantation Cemetery #1.
In March 1945, the remains were moved to U.S. Armed Forces Cemetery Finschhafen #2 where they were designated “Unknown X-34.”


In 1947, the American Graves Registration service exhumed approximately 11,000 sets of remains, including X-34, and sent them to the Central Identification Point at the Manila Mausoleum in the Philippines.
X-34 could not be identified and subsequently was interred at Fort McKinley (now the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial.)


On Nov. 4, 2016, Unknown X-34 was disinterred, and the remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify McCarville’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally,
scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 18, 2019

Army Sgt. Billy J. Maxwell, 19

 

Army Sgt. Billy J. Maxwell, 19, of Hogansville, Georgia, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Maxell was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. His unit was engaged in intense fighting with the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces at near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

He was reported missing in action Nov. 30, 1950. Following the war, his remains could not be recovered.

North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Maxwell’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA),
Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
October 18, 2019

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Joseph E. Finneran, 22

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Joseph E. Finneran, 22, Jamaica Plain, Miss. was killed during World War II, was accounted for. 


In the summer of 1943, Finneran was a bombardier assigned to the 345th Bombardment Squadron, 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), known as the Pyramidiers. On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24D aircraft on which Finneran served crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation Tidal Wave, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti, north of Bucharest, Romania.

Of the Americans killed, only 27 could be identified, not including Finneran. The remains that could not be identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel.
The teams disinterred all American remains from the Bolovan Cemetery for identification.
One set that could not be identified was designated Unknown X-5300 Neuville, and reinterred into the American Military Cemetery at Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium.


In 2017, DPAA began exhuming unknowns believed to be associated with unaccounted-for airmen from Operation Tidal Wave losses. On Aug. 28, 2017, Unknown X-5300 Neuville was disinterred and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Finneran’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 17, 2019

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Hubert P. Hall, 20

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Hubert P. Hall, 20, of Floyd County, Kentucky, accounted for on August 14, will be buried in the spring of 2020 at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hall was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Hall.


From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains
of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks.

The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the Punchbowl. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Hall.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma.
On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.


To identify Hall’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 17, 2019

U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Quentin W. McCall, 22

U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Quentin W. McCall, 22, of Union Church, Mississippi, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(The official DoD release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In November 1943, McCall was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island
of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

McCall was killed on the fourth day of the battle, Nov. 23, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in Cemetery 33 on Betio Island.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 17, 2019

Army Pfc. Donald E. Mangan, 26

Army Pfc. Donald E. Mangan, 26, of Elkton, South Dakota, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In 1944, Mangan was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Sept. 17, 1944, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces near Wettlingen, Germany. His remains could not be recovered after the attack.

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, was the unit tasked with investigation and recovery of missing American personnel. The AGRC collected thousands of unknown remains from across northern Europe. A mass grave of several 112th Infantry Soldiers was found near Wettlingen, and most were identified through identification tags or personal effects. However two sets, designated X-70 Hamm and X-71 Hamm, were declared unidentifiable, and subsequently buried in the Luxembourg American Cemetery as Unknowns.

In 2017, while studying American losses and unidentified remains recovered from combat around Wettlingen, Germany, a DPAA historian reviewed documents of X-70 Hamm, and determined that there were five unresolved American casualties who were last known to have been lost in combat near Wettlingen, including Mangan.

In April 2019, the Department of Defense and American Battle Monuments Commission disinterred X-70 Hamm and accessioned the remains to the DPAA laboratory.

To identify Mangan’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological analysis and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Pilot killed From World War II Accounted For
October 17, 2019

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Earl F. Ferguson, 26

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Earl F. Ferguson, 26, of Minneapolis, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official DoD release will be updated following primary next of kin briefing.)

In the summer of 1943, Ferguson was a pilot assigned to the 329th Bombardment Squadron, 93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), 8th Air Force.

On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24 aircraft on which Ferguson was the co-pilot crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation Tidal Wave, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti,
north of Bucharest, Romania. His remains were not identified following the war.

The remains that could not be identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 16, 2019

Army Sgt. David A. Feriend, 23

Army Sgt. David A. Feriend, 23, of Fife Lake, Michigan, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Feriend was a member of Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


To identify Feriend’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 16, 2019

Army Cpl. Robert L. Bray, 19

Army Cpl. Robert L. Bray, 18, of Chillicothe, Ohio, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1950, Bray was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Regiment, fighting against members of the Korean People’s Army. On July 20, 1950, he was reported missing in action in the vicinity of Taejon, South Korea. Absent of evidence of continued survival, the Department of the Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

According to historical reports, the 565th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company recovered a set of remains initially designated as Unknown X-704 Tanggok from a common grave in the Kujong-ni, South Korea.

On March 31, 1955, the remains were declared unidentifiable and were subsequently transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu and were interred as an Unknown.

In August 2018, following thorough historical and scientific analysis, X-704 Tanggok was disinterred from the Punchbowl and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Bray’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 16, 2019

Army Cpl. Ysabel A. Ortiz, 18

Army Cpl. Ysabel A. Ortiz, 18, El Monte, California was killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Ortiz was a member of Battery D, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 7th Infantry Division.
He was reported missing in action Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit engaged against enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. His remains could not be recovered following the battle.


North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War.

The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.
To identify Ortiz’ remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome DNA (Y-STR) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Coast Guard killed From World War II Accounted For
October 4, 2019

 

U.S. Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Thomas J.E. Crotty, 30

U.S. Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Thomas J.E. Crotty, 30, Buffalo, New York killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In 1942, Crotty served aboard the USS Quail in the Philippines as part of the 16th Naval District-in-Shore Patrol Headquarters, in Cavite Navy Yard on the Philippine Islands.

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner and sent to prisoner of war camps. Crotty was among those reported captured after the surrender of Corregidor and held at the Cabanatuan POW camp.

Crotty died July 19, 1942, and was buried along with fellow prisoners in the Cabanatuan Camp Cemetery, in grave number 312. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the war. According to prison camp and other historical records,

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and examined the remains in an attempt to identify them. Due to the circumstances of the deaths and burials, the extensive commingling, and the limited identification technologies of the time, all of the remains could not be identified. The unidentified remains were interred as “unknowns” in the present-day Manila American Cemetery and Memorial.

In January 2018, the “unknown” remains associated with Common Grave 312 were disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis, including one set, designated X-2858 Manila #2.

To identify Crotty’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 3, 2019

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Norman A. Buan, 27

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Norman A. Buan, 27, Saskatchewan, Canada killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official DoD release will be updated following Primary Next of Kin briefing.)

In November 1943, Buan was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Buan was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in in Beach Red 2 Cemetery on Betio Island.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 1, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Marley Arthurholtz, 20

Marine Corps Pfc. Marley Arthurholtz, 20, Indianapolis, Indiana killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(Official DoD release will be updated following Primary Next of Kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Arthurholtz was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Arthurholtz.

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 1, 2019

Marine Corps Pfc. Louis Wiesehan, Jr.,

Marine Corps Pfc. Louis Wiesehan, Jr., Richmond, Ind. killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official DoD release will be updated following Primary Next of Kin briefing.)

In November 1943, Wiesehan was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island.

Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Wiesehan was killed on the second day of the battle, Nov. 21, 1943. His remains were reportedly buried in Division Cemetery on Betio Island.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 1, 2019