RECENTLY FOUND HEROES

 

from ALL PAST WARS

 

 

HONOR THE DEAD BY HELPING THE LIVING”

Today, the DPAA is focused on the research, investigation, recovery, and identification
of the approximately 34,000 (out of approximately 83,000 missing DoD personnel)
believed to be recoverable, who were lost in conflicts from World War II to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

"Returning with Honor"
 

KHAMMOUANE, Laos --

With 1,586 service members missing in action from the Vietnam War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) deploys hundreds of service members,
DoD civilians, and contractors all over the world in hopes of returning our nation’s fallen heroes.

Recently a team of 59 personnel completed DPAA’s second Laos mission of fiscal year 2017, covering the Central East region of Laos. From rice patties to mountainsides,
the teams excavated thousands of square meters of land recovering important evidence relating to missing servicemen lost during the war.

“I’m very honored to have been part of this initiative to bring our missing home,” said U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chris Walgenbach,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “This mission has been the most unique part of my 13 year career in the military and I know others feel the same way.”

Every team member plays an important role in mission success. Whether that is the recovery non-commissioned officer setting up the sites,
or the recovery leader collecting scientific data, working together ensures nothing is overlooked and the safety of the team remains number one priority.

Due to the efforts of the teams, Laos representatives handed over possible remains to the U.S. to be repatriated and welcomed back on American soil after 48 years.
Upon arrival the possible remains will be transported to DPAA’s laboratory for examination and possible identification.

“During this mission I have worked along side some of the greatest men and women I’ve had the pleasure of meeting,
and being chosen for the repatriation ceremony was a perfect way to end such a great mission,” said U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Andrew Brod,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “It is truly an honor to be bringing closure to the families of our fallen service members.”

The hard work and continued dedication of these teams makes it possible for DPAA to fulfill our nations promise and
provide fullest possible accounting for our missing service members to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Ameil Fredeluces, edic, and U.S. Marine Corps. Staff Sgt. Eddie Ludwig, explosive ordinance disposal technician,
remove dirt from units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos,
  Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual
reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting
for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency dig units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing
U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the
fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Jack Kenkeo, life support investigator, shovels dirt from the screening stations during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Francis Sangiamvongse, linguist, screens soil with local villagers during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA
Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search
of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Lynn Rakos, scientific recovery expert, waters hard soil to help with excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission
in the Khammovan Province, Laos. Recovery Team three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

 Making the effort to thank the troops for what they do out in the field means everything.
With a DPAA recovery team in Quang Nam Province, two hours west of Da Nang, Vietnam.

 

 

Disappearance of two Madison airmen in 1953 remains a mystery

The unsolved case called "one of the most enduring mysteries of the Great Lakes"
has been the subject of numerous articles and a film on Canadian television.

The UW-Madison story involved a group of six students and staff members who were part of a team that unearthed a World War II U.S. fighter aircraft—
and possibly remains of its pilot—in the ground under a farm field in France this summer.

The team used ground-penetrating radar and a photo taken by a British reconnaissance plane two days after the May, 1944
crash of the P-47 Thunderbolt flown by 1st Lt. Frank Fazekas.

 

 

 

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II.
Divers of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and Civil Defense of Grado, Italy,
prepare for an exploratory dive on the sunken B-24 bomber. 

This B-24 Liberator is the same type of airplane that
Lakewood, Ohio airman Thomas McGraw was flying in when it was shot down and crashed off the coast of Italy during World War II.

A Missing Air Crew Report details the last flight of the B-24 and nose gunner Thomas McGraw of Lakewood, Ohio.
B-24 located in Adriatic; Crewmanis bones sought Ught Lakewood Manis remains crewman Omber crew,am2-2k-28 bold Header from A1.
 

A skull fragment was recovered at the site of a wrecked B-24 bomber
off the coast of Italy that may contain the remains of
Thomas McGraw, of Lakewood, Ohio.

An underwater view of the crash site of a B-24 off Grado, Italy.

 

 

 

FINDING ENSIGN HAROLD P. DeMOSS IN THE MUCK AND MIRE

“Seeing those photos was so overwhelming that I cried like a baby”
said DeMoss’ niece, Judy Ivey. “To see this actually taking place
is not anything I ever really expected.”

Anine-person military team has been digging up mud four days a week
in the Koolau range in search of a missing World War II pilot whose
fighter crashed in cloud cover during a night training flight.

A bucket-and-pulley system was set up to move excavated
material to a spot where it can be bundled in tarps for
helicopter transport to Wheeler Army Airfield.

NOTE: The Navy’s Bureau of Medicine and Surgery said in a 1948 letter
to the family that “an attempt to recover the remains was
considered impracticable” because the site was 7 miles
from a traveled highway in the mountains.

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb. 25, 1944, Duran wasn’t supposed to be on the doomed B-24H Liberator, nicknamed “Knock it Off.”
Normally a nose turret gunner, Duran was the substitute tail turret gunner on the flight, replacing the usual tail gunner who had frostbite.

 

The earth by the headstone next to the church in this tiny mountain village was full of rocks.

 

Two days of digging under a hot sun had yielded buckets of gravel, stones the size of men’s fists and many piles of dirt – but no bones.
After 73 years, Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran was still missing.

The family feels a sense of closure regardless of the outcome, Duran said.
“What a difference it would have made to my father and to my aunt,”
she said, “to know he had died and somebody had buried him and tended the grave.”

 

 

 

Members of the recovery team attach a POW flag to the wreckage of the
Tulsamerican, a B-24 Liberator piloted by, Lt. Eugene P. Ford, a Derry Township, Pa. native,
when it crashed into the Adriatic Sea in 1944.

 

 

 

 

FIELD OPERATIONS IN LAOS AND CAMBODIA, JANUARY/FEBRUARY, 2020

 

 

US Ambassador to Cambodia Patrick Murphy,
prepares to screen dirt during a DPAA recovery mission in Ratanakiri Province,
Cambodia, February 1, 2020.

Mr. Alexander Garcia-Putnam, right, a senior recovery expert assigned to DPAA,
speaks to US service members and Lao officials during a joint field activity
(JFA) in Khammouan Province, Laos, February 2, 2020

SG Carter Caraker, USA, a DPAA supply non-commissioned officer,
passes buckets to local workers during a JFA in Khammouan Province, Laos, February 10, 2020.
During the JFA, a group of more than 70 personnel, assigned to DPAA and augmented from military units around the globe,
worked together to help fulfill our nation's promise to provide the fullest possible accounting of our missing personnel.

 

 

2021 Recoveries

Underwater Recovery Mission - Vietnam:
U.S. Coast Guard underwater recovery mission in
Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam, May 27 2021.

 

 

Vietnam Recovery Mission:
U.S. Army DPAA recovery team member, swings a pick axe to loosen dirt during
a recovery mission in Quang Binh province, Vietnam, July 3, 2021.

 

 

Vietnam Repatriation Ceremony:
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Detachment 2 and the Vietnam Office for Seeking
Missing Persons (VNOSMP) held the 155th Repatriation
Ceremony on 9 July 2021 at Gia Lam Airport outside Hanoi, Vietnam.

 

 

Repatriation Ceremony – Laos:
Detachment Three-Laos, pause for a photo during the signing of remains turnover documents
 at a Repatriation Ceremony June 22, 2021 in Vientiane, Laos.

 

 

Honorable Carry from Laos:
DPAA members conducted an Honorable Carry ceremony on Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam, June 23, 2021.
The remains were recently repatriated to the U.S. during a ceremony in Vientiane, Laos.

 

 

 

 


USS Arizona BB-39

USS Arizona was a Pennsylvania-class battleship built for and by the United States Navy in the mid-1910s. Named in honor of the 48th state's recent admission into the union, the ship was the second and last of the Pennsylvania class of "super-dreadnought" battleships. Although commissioned in 1916, the ship remained stateside during World War I. Shortly after the end of the war, Arizona was one of a number of American ships that briefly escorted President Woodrow Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference. The ship was sent to Turkey in 1919 at the beginning of the Greco-Turkish War to represent American interests for several months. Several years later, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet and remained there for the rest of her career.

Aside from a comprehensive modernization in 1929–31, 
Arizona was regularly used for training exercises between the wars, including the annual Fleet Problems (training exercises). When an earthquake struck Long Beach, California, in 1933, Arizona's crew provided aid to the survivors. Two years later, the ship was featured in a Jimmy Cagney film, Here Comes the Navy, about the romantic troubles of a sailor. In April 1940, she and the rest of the Pacific Fleet were transferred from California to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as a deterrent to Japanese imperialism.

During the 
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Arizona was bombed. After a bomb detonated in a powder magazine, the battleship exploded violently and sank, killing 1,177 officers and crewmen. Unlike many of the other ships sunk or damaged that day, Arizona was irreparably damaged by the force of the magazine explosion, though the Navy removed parts of the ship for reuse. The wreck still lies at the bottom of Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona Memorial, dedicated on 30 May 1962 to all those who died during the attack, straddles the ship's hull.

 

 

 

 

USS California BB-44

A number of other boats were sunk in the attack, but later recovered and repaired.
The USS 
California (BB-44) lost 100 crew members that morning, after the ship suffered extensive flooding damage when hit by two torpedoes on the port side.
Both torpedoes detonated below the armor belt causing virtually identical damage each time.
A 250 kg bomb also entered the starboard upper deck level, which passed through the main deck and exploded on the armored second deck,
setting off an anti-aircraft ammunition magazine and killing about 50 men.

After three days of flooding, the California settled into the mud with only her superstructure remaining above the surface.
She was later re-floated and dry-docked at Pearl Harbor for repairs. USS 
California served many missions throughout the war,
and was eventually decommissioned in February, 1947.

 

 

 

USS Cassin DD-372

On the morning of December 7, 1941, Japanese bombs fell and torpedoes slashed through the waters of Pearl Harbor,
causing a devastating amount of damage to the vessels lined up in Battleship Row in in the dry docks nearby.
Each of the seven battleships moored there suffered some degree of damage, some far worse than others.
The USS 
Arizona (BB-39) and the USS Oklahoma (BB-37) were completely destroyed. Though the Maryland (BB-46) was believed by Japan to also have been sunk, she ultimately survived and became one of the first ships to return to the war.
During the attack on Pearl Harbor, ships like the USS 
Cassin (DD-372), a Mahan-class destroyer, suffered what was originally thought to be fatal damage.
While she was extensively damaged during the attack, she was resurrected and went on to return to service during the remainder of World War II.

 

 

 

USS West Virginia BB-48

The sunken battleship USS West Virginia (BB-48) at Pearl Harbor after her fires were out, possibly on 8 December 1941.
USS Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard. A Vought OS2U Kingfisher floatplane (marked “4-O-3”) is upside down on West Virginia’s main deck.
A second OS2U is partially burned out atop the Turret No. 3 catapult. 

In the aftermath of the attacks on Pearl Harbor during World War Two stories emerged of sailors who were trapped in the sunken battleships, some even survived for weeks.

Those who were trapped underwater banged continuously on the side of the ship so that anyone would hear them and come to their rescue.
When the noises were first heard many thought it was just loose wreckage or part of the clean-up operation for the destroyed harbor.

However the day after the attack, crewmen realized that there was an eerie banging noise coming from the forward hull of the USS West Virginia, which had sunk in the harbor.

t didn’t take long for the crew and Marines based at the harbor to realize that there was nothing they could do. They could not get to these trapped sailors in time.
Months later rescue and salvage men who raised the USS West Virginia found the bodies of three men who had found an airlock in a storeroom but had eventually run out of air.

Survivors say that no one wanted to go on guard duty anywhere near the USS West Virginia since they would hear the banging of trapped survivors all night long,
but with nothing that could be done.

When salvage crews raised the battleship West Virginia six months after the Pearl Harbor attacks,
they found the bodies of three sailors huddled in an airtight storeroom —
and a calendar on which 16 days had been crossed off in
red pencil.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma BB-37 

The USS Oklahoma was on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. That was the morning that the Japanese Empire attacked the United States by surprise.

The Japanese used dive–bombers, fighter–bombers, and torpedo planes to sink nine ships, including five battleships, and severely damage 21 ships.
There were 2,402 US deaths from the attack. 1,177 of those deaths were from the USS Arizona, while 429 of the deaths were from the USS Oklahoma.

The crew of the USS Oklahoma did everything they could to fight back. In the first ten minutes of the battle, though, eight torpedoes hit the Oklahoma, and she began to capsize.  A ninth torpedo would hit her as she sunk in the mud.  14 Marines, and 415 sailors would give their lives. 32 men were cut out through the hull while the others were beneath the waterline.  Banging could be heard for over 3 days and then there was silence.

After the battle, the Navy decided that they could not salvage the Oklahoma due to how much damage she had received.  The difficult savage job began in March 1943, and Oklahoma entered dry dock 28 December. Decommissioning  September 1, 1944, Oklahoma was stripped of guns and superstructure, and sold December 5, 1946 to Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif. Oklahoma parted her tow line and sank May 17, 1947.  540 miles out, bound from Pearl Harbor to San Francisco.  Today, there is a memorial to the USS Oklahoma and the 429 sailors and marines lost on December 7, 1941, located on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

USS Oglala CM-4

The minelayer Oglala technically didn't suffer a hit on December 7, but a torpedo passed under it and hit the USS Helena
The blast from that crippled the old 
Oglala which had been built as a civilian vessel in 1906.
The crewmembers took their guns to the Navy Yard Dock and set them up to provide more defenses.
They also set up a first aid station that saved the lives of West Virginia crewmembers.

The ship suffered horribly, eventually capsizing and sinking until just a few feet of the ship's starboard side remained above water.
It was declared lost, and the Navy even considered blowing it up with dynamite to clear the dock it had sunk next to.
But the decision was made that it could destroy the dock, so the Navy had to refloat it. At that point, it made sense to dry dock and repair it.

None of the crew of Oglala were killed in the attack, although three received injuries. 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

DPAA Makes 200th Identification from USS Oklahoma Unknown Remains.
Arlington, Virginia.

 


Sean Patterson, Armed Forces Medical Examiner System Department of Defense DNA Quality Management Section DNA Analyst,
replaces U. S. Navy Fireman 1st Class Billy James Johnson's picture background, signifying him as an identified service member who was previously missing in action.
Johnson marks the 200th service member to be identified following the December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor
attack where 429 U.S. Sailors and Marines were killed on the USS Oklahoma (BB-37). 

A series of large posters hang in the conference room of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency laboratory located at Offutt Air Base, Nebraska.
The heading on each of the posters states “USS OKLAHOMA.” Underneath the headings are neat rows of printed rectangular frames. 
Each one represents a person who was unaccounted for when the USS Oklahoma was sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Thanks to the work of Dr. Brown’s team, the remains of 200 previously unknown crewmen from the USS Oklahoma
have now been returned to their families for proper burial and their families have those long-awaited answers.

The story of the USS Oklahoma’s lost crewmen is an evolving history lesson that began on what
President Franklin D. Roosevelt called

“a date that will live in infamy.”

 

LIST OF USS OKLAHOMA IDENTIFICATIONS FROM MICHIGAN:
(Please note that in some USS Oklahoma identifications,
the primary next of kin has yet to be notified,
and therefore the names will not be released at this time.)

Seaman Second Class Warren P. Hickok of Kalamazoo, Mich.

Staff Sgt. Joseph M. King, of Detroit, Mich.

Fireman Third Class Gerald G. Lehman, of Hancock, Mich.

Machinist Mate First Class Fred M. Jones, 30 of Port Huron, Michigan

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, 19, of Ontonagon, Michigan,

Navy Seaman 1st Class Robert W. Headington, 19, Bay City, Michigan

Navy Seaman 2nd Class John C. Auld, 23, Grosse Park, Michigan,

Navy Ensign William M. Finnegan, 44, of Bessemer, Michigan,

Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Fred M. Jones, 31, of Otter Lake, Michigan,

Navy Seaman 1st Class Robert W. Headington, 19, of Bay City, Michigan,

Navy Seaman 1st Class Edward Wasielewski, Plymouth, MI

U.S. Naval Reserve Ensign Frances C. Flaherty, 22, of CharlotteMichigan.

Navy Seaman 1st Class Joe R. Nightingale, 20, Kalamazoo, Michigan

Navy Seaman 1st Class Edward Wasielewski, 21, of Detroit,

U.S. Naval Reserve Ensign Francis C. Flaherty, 22, of Charlotte, Michigan,

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Raymond D. Boynton, 19, Grand Rapids, MI

Navy Seaman 1st Class Wilbur F. Ballance, 20, Paw Paw, Michigan

 

It is through this effort that the accounting community
has been able to honor the sacrifices of the USS Oklahoma Sailors and Marines
and their families who pushed for the fullest possible accounting of their loved ones.

 

 

 

Ford Island is seen in this aerial view during the Japanese attack on Pearl harbor December 7, 1941 in Hawaii.
(The photo was taken from a Japanese plane.)

 

 

Remember the fallen: In all, 429 people on board the battleship were killed in the attack.
Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.

 

 

Battleship USS Oklahoma unturned hull at the bottom of Pearl Harbor
after the devastating Japanese bombing attack on Dec. 7, 1941.

 

                                                                                                                      

 

 

                                                                                                   The North Texans of Pearl Harbor
                                                                                                      

                                                                                       Their obituaries tell of lives cut short – and of lives well lived.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Memorial at Pearl Harbor

 

 

 

 

 

THE KOREAN WAR, 1950-1957

 

 


 

Breakdown by War - Still Unaccounted for/Unreturned Veterans:

WW I         3,343
WW II     72,784
Korea        7,676
Vietnam     1,584
Cold War      126
Gulf/Other        6
Total         85,519
*As of June 2021

 

 

 

 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following WWII from MICHIGAN - 2450
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Korea from MICHIGAN - 331
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Cold War from MICHIGAN - 4
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Viet Nam from MICHIGAN - 48
 

 


 

RECENTLY FOUND
 HEROES in 2022

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
January 7, 2022

Army Cpl. R.B. Cherry, 19

Army Cpl. R.B. Cherry, 19, of Dallas, who died as a prisoner of war during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Cherry was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 27, 1950, near Anju, North Korea.

 Using information provided by returned POWs after the war, it was determined that Cherry had been a POW in Camp 5 and died of pneumonia sometime in the winter of 1950.
His remains were reportedly buried in a cemetery near the camp and were not recovered.


During Operation GLORY in 1954, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea returned the remains of just over 4,200 individuals, of which nearly 3,000 were determined to be American. During the subsequent processing and identification of these remains, none were associated with Cherry, and he was declared non-recoverable Jan. 16, 1956. At the end of the identification process, 848 unidentified remains, including one designated X-13460 Operation GLORY, were interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

 It was determined that some of the remains thought to be from the 1st MARDIV Cemetery, including X-13460, actually came from the cemetery near Camp 5.

Cherry’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Cherry will be buried in his hometown. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

Today, 7,510 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

 

USS West Virginia Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
January
4, 2022

Navy Seaman 1st Class John R. Melton, 23

Navy Seaman 1st Class John R. Melton, 23, Mississippi was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Melton was assigned to the battleship USS West Virginia, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The West Virginia was moored at Ford Island when it was hit by two bombs and at least seven torpedoes, blowing a huge hole in the ship’s port side, and it came to rest
on the shallow harbor floor.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 106 crewmen, including Melton.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Melton is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

 

 

Currently there are 72,395 service members still unaccounted for from World War II.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today there are 1,583 American servicemen and civilians that are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

 


POW/MIA's from 2021

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
December 23
, 2021

Navy Seaman 1st Class Billy Turner, 20

Navy Seaman 1st Class Billy Turner, 20, Ardmore, Carter County, OK was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Turner was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Turner.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Billy Turner is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
December 21, 2021

Army Pfc. Don D. Dowler, Jr., 18

Army Pfc. Don D. Dowler, Jr., 18, of Clarinda, Iowa, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Dowler was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces as they attempted to withdraw near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

Dowler’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Dowler will be buried Santa Maria, California. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
December 20
, 2021

Army Air Forces Capt. Nando A. Cavalieri, 24

Army Air Forces Capt. Nando A. Cavalieri, 24, of Eveleth, Minnesota, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In February 1945, Cavalieri was assigned to 324th Bombardment Squadron, 91st Bombardment Group, 8th Air Force in the European Theater. On Feb. 3, the B-17G Flying Fortress bomber on which he was serving as bombardier was flying a mission over Berlin when it was struck by enemy anti-aircraft fire. The plane broke into two pieces in the air and crashed. Cavalieri’s bomber was one of 21 bombers to be lost during the mission. German forces reportedly recovered his body and ID tags after the crash and buried him in Döberitz, Germany, on Feb. 7.

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was tasked with investigating and recovering missing American personnel in Europe. They recovered all of the American remains buried in Döberitz, but were unable to identify Cavalieri. He was declared non-recoverable on Oct. 23, 1951.

Between 2016 and 2018, DPAA historians completed a comprehensive research project focused on the eight sets of unknown remains recovered from Döberitz. As a result, one set of remains, designated X-4983 Neuville, was determined to be a strong candidate for association with Cavalieri. The remains, which had been buried in Ardennes American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission cemetery in Belgium, were disinterred in June 2018 and sent to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and identification.

Cavalieri’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands,
along with the others still missing from World War II.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Cavalieri will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be determined

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
December 16
, 2021

Navy Seaman 1st Class Wilbur F. Newton, 29

Navy Seaman 1st Class Wilbur F. Newton, 29, Washington killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Newton was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

 The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

 The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Newton.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Wilbur L Newton is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at West Coast Memorial, Presidio, California.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
December 15, 2021

Army Pfc. Jimmy Rowland, 19

Army Pfc. Jimmy Rowland, 19, of Baldwyn, Mississippi, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In July 1950, Rowland was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on July 16 while fighting North Korean forces along the Kum River north of Taejon, South Korea. He was never found, nor were any remains recovered that could be identified as Rowland. He was declared non-recoverable in January 1956.

In February 1951, four sets of remains were recovered at the foot of a bridge west of the Seoul-Taejon main supply route and south of Taepyong-ni. Three of the individuals were identified as casualties from the 19th Inf. Reg., but the fourth was unable to be identified. Those remains were designated Unknown X-418 Tanggok and were later transported with all of the unidentified Korean War remains and buried as Unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In July 2018, DPAA historians and anthropologists proposed a plan to disinter and identify the 652 Korean War unknown burials from the Punchbowl. X-418 was disinterred March 4, 2019, as part of Phase 1 of the Korean War Identification Project and transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

Rowland’s name is recorded on the American Battle Monument Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Rowland will be buried Jan. 15, 2022, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
December 15
, 2021

Navy Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Edward L. Conway, 29

Navy Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Edward L. Conway, 29, Fremont County, Colorado killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Conway was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

 The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Conway.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Edward L. Conway is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

 

USS California Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
December 15
, 2021

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Tceollyar Simmons, 18

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Tceollyar Simmons, 18, Geneva County, Alabama killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Simmons was assigned to the battleship USS California, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS California sustained multiple torpedo and bomb hits, which caused it catch fire and slowly flood.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 104 crewmen, including Simmons.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Tceollyar Simmons is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Place of Interment Corner Creek Lower Cemetery - Hacoda, Alabama

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
December 1
4, 2021

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Hugh R. Alexander, 43

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Hugh R. Alexander, 43, of Potters Mills, Pennsylvania, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Alexander was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Alexander. He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for his actions in saving the lives of several fellow crew members.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Alexander.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for his actions in saving the lives of several fellow crew members.

Alexander’s name is recorded on the American Battle Monuments Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Alexander will be buried in San Diego. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
December 10, 2021

Army Cpl. Marvin D. Actkinson, 18

Army Cpl. Marvin D. Actkinson, 18, of Sudan, Texas, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Actkinson was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces as they attempted to withdraw near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

Actkinson’s name is recorded on the American Battle Monuments Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,
along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Actkinson will be buried in Colorado City, Texas. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
December 9, 2021

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Anel B. Shay, Jr., 26

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Anel B. Shay, Jr., 26, of Seattle, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1943, Shay was assigned to the 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force. On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24 Liberator aircraft on which Shay was serving as a bombardier crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation TIDAL WAVE, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti, north of Bucharest, Romania. His remains were not identified following the war. The remains that could not be identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel, disinterred all American remains from the Bolovan Cemetery for identification. The AGRC was unable to identify more than 80 unknowns from Bolovan Cemetery, and those remains were permanently interred at Ardennes American Cemetery and Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, both in Belgium.

In 2017, DPAA began exhuming unknowns believed to be associated with unaccounted for airmen from Operation TIDAL WAVE losses. These remains were sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and identification.

Shay’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Impruneta, Italy,
along with others still missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Shay will be buried in his hometown. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
December 8, 2021

Army Pfc. Anthony F. Mendonca, 28

Army Pfc. Anthony F. Mendonca, 28, of Waipahu, Hawaii, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In June 1944, Mendonca was a member of Company A, 106th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division, when American forces participated in the battle for Saipan, part of a larger operation to secure the Mariana Islands. Mendonca was killed during fighting on June 28. His remains were reportedly not recovered.

Remains identified as Unknown X-10 were first reported as buried in Army Cemetery #1 on Saipan July 10, 1944. The remains were disinterred sometime later and interred in the Fort William McKinley Cemetery, now the American Battle Monuments Commission’s (ABMC) Manila American Cemetery and Memorial, in the Philippines on Feb. 5, 1952.

After thorough historical research, it was determined that X-10 could likely be identified. On Jan. 20, 2019, Unknown X-10 was disinterred and sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for analysis.

To identify Mendonca’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Mendonca’s name is recorded on the ABMC’s Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP) in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing
from World War II.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Mendonca will be buried Dec. 16, 2021, at the NMCP in Honolulu.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
December 7, 2021

Army Cpl. Benjamin R. Bazzell, 18

Army Cpl. Benjamin R. Bazzell, 18, of Seymour, Connecticut, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Bazzell was a member of Headquarters Battery, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported killed in action on Nov. 30, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify Bazzell’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y chromosome (Y-STR), and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

Bazzell’s name is recorded on the American Battle Monuments Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,
along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Bazzell will be buried in Kent, Washington. The date has yet to be decided.

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
December 3, 2021

U.S. Army Pfc. Morris E. Swackhammer, 20

 U.S. Army Pfc. Morris E. Swackhammer, 20, of Binghamton, New York, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the latter half of 1944, Swackhammer was assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 143rd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division. In August, his unit landed on the southern coast of France as part of Operation DRAGOON. After securing the coastal ports, the 36th ID drove north, meeting with the D-Day invasion force before turning towards Germany. On Nov. 22, Swackhammer’s unit engaged in a heavy firefight with enemy troops in a wooded area northwest of Fraize, a village in the Alsace region. He was hit by a spray of bullets from a German machine gun. His squad recovered his body, but had to leave it behind due to the strength of the enemy attack. After Fraize was liberated, Swackhammer’s body could not be found, and it is likely either German troops or residents of Fraize removed it.

The American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was charged with recovering the remains of fallen service members in the European Theater following the war. Sometime in 1945, U.S. personnel recovered an unidentified body, designated X-756 Epinal, from a cemetery in Fraize. Though the AGRC thought that X-756 could possibly be Swackhammer, they could not confirm because of lack of identifying information in his records. X-756 was interred in the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupré, Belgium.

Following exhaustive historical research and correlation of various U.S. military and French civilian sources, DPAA officials concluded the remains designated as X-756 were strongly associated with Swackhammer. X-756 was exhumed in July 2019 and transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for analysis.

Swackhammer’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Epinal American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Dinozé, France,
along with others still missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Swackhammer will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be decided.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
 From
(Group ID)
December 2, 2021

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced today that 33 Sailors from the USS Oklahoma
killed during World War II were accounted for on Oct. 18, 2021.

The Sailors included in this group accounting are:

                                                                                            
Yeoman  Harding Coolidge Blackburn, Kentucky.                 Mess Attendant Randall Walter Brewer, Virginia

                                                                 
Machinist's James Rufus Buchanan, California.                          Electrician's William McKnight Curry, Tennessee.  

                                                                
Storekeeper George Perry Foote, Iowa.                        Fireman George Edward Giesa, New York.

                                                                
Chief Electrician  William Ike Gurganus, California.                      Seaman Robert Emile Halterman, Illinois

                                                          
Musician Louis Edward Harris, Jr., Michigan.                Seaman Jimmie Lee Henrichsen, South Dakota

                                                                                                                              
Radioman Frank Samuel Hoag, Jr., Washington.              Storekeeper Chester George Hord, Missouri

                                                    
Officer's Cook Willie Jackson, California.           Seaman Charles Homer Johannes, North Dakota

                                                 
Mess Attendant Jerry Jones, Mississippi.              Radioman Warren Joseph Kempf, Missouri.

                                                    
Shipfitter Algeo Victor Malfante, California.              Electrician Walter Benjamin Manning, Georgia.

                                                 
Seaman Lloyd Elden McLaughlin, Nebraska.                Yeoman Sam Douglas Nevill, Oklahoma.

                                                  
Musician James Junior Palides, Iowa.          Storekeeper  Eldon Casper Ray, Tennessee.

                                                   
Water Tender  Leo Basil Regan, California.              Radioman Clyde Ridenour, Jr., Texas.

                                                           
Seaman William Lawrence Sellon, Montana.                 Musician Rowland Hampton Smith, California.

                                                           
Seaman Rangner Faber Tanner, Jr., Kansas.               Seaman Charles Edward Walters, Ohio.

                                                                                 
Seaman Jack Dewey White, Missouri.                      Musician Albert Luther Williams, Illinois.

                                                              
Officer’s Steward  Wilbur Slade Williams, Virginia.               Gunner's Mate John Layman Wortham, Kentucky.


Chief Signalman Thomas Zvansky,  California.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

The names of these Sailors are recorded on the American Battle Monuments Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl,
along with the others who are missing from WWII.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
December 2, 2021

Army Master Sgt. James L. Quong, 30

Army Master Sgt. James L. Quong, 30, of Norman, Oklahoma, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Quong, who was an Army Reserve captain in World War II but gave up his commission to join the Regular Army as a master sergeant in the Korean War, was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

Quong’s name is recorded on the American Battle Monuments Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu,
along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Quong will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
December 2, 2021

Army Sgt. James N. Stryker, 20

Army Sgt. James N. Stryker, 20, of West Nanticoke, Pennsylvania, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In May 1951, Stryker was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on May 18, when the enemy attacked his unit near Han’gye, South Korea. His remains could not be immediately recovered, but he was not officially declared dead until after the Armistice was signed July 27, 1953.

During a search of Korean War battlefields later in May 1951, an unknown set of remains was recovered from the area where Stryker went missing. After a preliminary examination at Tanggok United Nations Military Cemetery, an identification could not be made and the remains were buried as Unknown X-1373 Tanggok. Further attempts were made to identify X-1373, but were unsuccessful.

The remains were later transported with all of the unidentified Korean War remains and buried as Unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

In May 2017, the family of an unresolved Soldier associated with the same area where Stryker went missing requested X-1373 be disinterred for comparison with their Soldier. Further research by a DPAA historian and forensic anthropologist determined X-1373 and the Soldier were unlikely to be associated, but that X-1373 could be associated with Stryker or five other Soldiers. X-1373 was disinterred Aug. 20, 2018, and sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor/Hickam, Hawaii, for analysis.

Stryker’s name is recorded on the American Battle Monuments Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Stryker will be buried in San Antonio, Texas. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
December 1
, 2021

Navy Seaman 1st Class Buford H. Dyer, 19

Navy Seaman 1st Class Buford H. Dyer, 19, of Barberton, Ohio, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Dyer was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Dyer.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.

The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.
 In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Dyer.


Dyer’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Dyer will be buried on April 11, 2022, in Seville, Ohio.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 22
, 2021

Army Sgt. Larry S. Wassil, 33

Army Sgt. Larry S. Wassil, 33, of Bloomfield, New Jersey, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In late 1944, Wassil was assigned to Company K, 3rd Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division. His unit was part of the Hürtgen Forest offensive, near Hürtgen, Germany, when he was reported missing in action on Dec. 28. He was leading a three-man reconnaissance team scouting enemy positions near Bergstein when they started taking enemy machine gun fire, forcing them to scatter. When the gunfire stopped, the other two men found each other, but were unable to find Wassil. German forces never listed him as a prisoner of war. The War Department issued a presumptive finding of death on Dec. 29, 1945.

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was tasked with investigating and recovering missing American personnel in Europe. They conducted several investigations in the Hürtgen area between 1946 and 1950, but were unable to recover or identify Wassil’s remains. He was declared non-recoverable in December 1951.

While studying unresolved American losses in the Hürtgen area, a DPAA historian determined that one set of unidentified remains, designated X-9118 Griesheim Mausoleum, originally discovered by German wood cutters near Bergstein and recovered by the AGRC in 1952, possibly belonged to Wassil. The remains, which had been buried in Ardennes American Cemetery, were disinterred in April 2019 and sent to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and identification.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Wassil’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten,
 Netherlands, along with the others still missing from World War II.


Wassil will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 19, 2021

Navy Fire Controlman 2nd Class Lawrence J. Overley, 21

Navy Fire Controlman 2nd Class Lawrence J. Overley, 21, California killed during World War II, was accounted for on July 16, 2021.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Overley was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Overley.

Overley’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.
 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 18, 2021

Army Tech. Sgt. Ross H. Thompson, 50

Army Tech. Sgt. Ross H. Thompson, 50, Blount County, Tennessee who was captured and died as a prisoner of war during World War II, was accounted for.

In late 1941, Thompson was a member of the Finance Department, U.S. Army Forces Far East (USAFE), when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands in December.

Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on April 9, 1942, and of Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942.

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were captured and interned at POW camps.

Thompson was among those reported captured when USAFE forces in Bataan surrendered to the Japanese.

They were subjected to the 65-mile Bataan Death March and then held at the Cabanatuan POW camp.

According to prison camp and other historical records, more than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the war.

Thompson died Dec. 10, 1942, and was buried along with other deceased prisoners in the local Cabanatuan Camp Cemetery, in Common Grave 917.

Ross H Thompson is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines. 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 17, 2021

Army Cpl. Leon E. Clevenger, 21

Army Cpl. Leon E. Clevenger, 21, of Durham, North Carolina, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1950, Clevenger was an infantryman with Company K, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on July 11, 1950, while involved in combat operations against the North Korean People’s Army in the vicinity of Chonui and Choch’iwon, South Korea.
The Army amended his status to deceased in December 1953 when there was no updated information regarding his status.


In November 1951, a U.S. Army Graves Registration Team recovered the remains of an unidentified American near the village of Kalgo-ri, approximately three miles from Clevenger’s last known location. The remains were taken to the United States Military Cemetery Tanggok for possible identification, and were later sent to the Central Identification Unit at Kokura, Japan, as Unknown X-2258 Tanggok for further processing. The remains, which could not be identified, were subsequently buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of the Army for their partnership in this mission.

Clevenger’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl along with the others who are missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Clevenger will be buried Dec. 11, 2021, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 17, 2021

Army Sgt. Howard R. Belden, 19

Army Sgt. Howard R. Belden, 19, of Hague, New York, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Belden was a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

Belden’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Belden will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 15, 2021

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. John J. Heffernan, Jr., 24

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. John J. Heffernan, Jr., 24, New York killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In February 1944, Heffernan was a member of the 490th Bomb Squadron, 341st Bomb Group, 10th Air Force.

On Feb. 22, he was serving as the navigator of a B-25G Mitchell bomber while on a bombing mission from Kurmitola, India, to railroads south of Monywa, Burma.

Before reaching the target, Ryan’s plane burst into flames and crashed near Letpadaung. Local villagers told investigators at the time that the Japanese confiscated
all personal items from the crash and told them to bury the bodies.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

John J Heffernan Jr is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing Manila American Cemetery Manila, Philippines.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 10, 2021

Army Pfc. Juan F. Gutierrez, 26

Army Pfc. Juan F. Gutierrez, 26, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, who was captured and died as a prisoner of war during World War II, was accounted for.

In late 1941, Gutierrez was a member of 200th Coast Artillery Regiment, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands in December. Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on April 9, 1942, and of Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942.

Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were captured and interned at POW camps. Gutierrez was among those reported captured after the surrender of Corregidor and held at the Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the war.

According to prison camp and other historical records, Gutierrez died Nov. 19, 1942, and was buried along with other deceased prisoners in the local Cabanatuan Camp Cemetery, in Common Grave 717.

Following the war, American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) personnel exhumed those buried at the Cabanatuan cemetery and relocated the remains to a temporary U.S. military mausoleum near Manila. In 1947, the AGRS examined the remains in an attempt to identify them. Gutierrez was identified in March that year, though recent discoveries made possible because of technology not available in the 1940s revealed this to be a misidentification.

In August 2014, remains associated with Common Grave 717 were disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for analysis.

 Gutierrez’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC).

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Gutierrez will be buried Dec. 7, 2021, in Oakland, California.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 10, 2021

 Army Cpl. Charles E. Lee, 18

 Army Cpl. Charles E. Lee, 18, of Cincinnati Ohio, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In July 1950, Lee was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on July 20 after his unit was forced to retreat from the vicinity of Taejon, South Korea.

 He was never found, nor were any remains recovered that could be identified as Lee. He was declared non-recoverable in January 1956.

Two sets of remains, designated Unknown X-781 and X-782 Tanggok, were recovered from a common grave near the Taejon-Kumchon main supply route a few miles east of Taejon in March 1951. X-782 was identified in February 1952, but X-781 was unable to be identified. The X-781 remains were later transported with all of the unidentified Korean War remains and buried as Unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

Lee’s name is recorded on the American Battle Monument Commission’s Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Lee will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia.

The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 10, 2021

Army Pfc. Jack E. Lilley, 19

Army Pfc. Jack E. Lilley, 19, Medina County, Ohio killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In July 1950, Lilley was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division.

 He was reported missing in action on July 20 after his unit was forced to retreat from the vicinity of Taejon, South Korea.

He was never found, nor were any remains recovered that could be identified as Lilley.

He was listed as Missing in Action while fighting the enemy near Taejon, South Korea on July 20, 1950. He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Jack E Lilley is buried or memorialized at Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 10, 2021

Army Pvt. Edward M. Ryan, 33

Army Pvt. Edward M. Ryan, 33, New York County, New York killed during World War II, was accounted for Nov. 3, 2021.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In July 1944, Ryan was a member of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division, which occupied defensive positions along the northwest coast of Saipan as part of a larger operation to secure the Mariana Islands.

On the morning of July 7, the commanding general of the Japanese forces ordered a mass suicide charge of his remaining soldiers into the 105th’s line.

 Ryan was killed sometime during the attack.

He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Edward M Ryan is buried or memorialized at Courts of the Missing Honolulu Memorial National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific Honolulu, Hawaii. 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 10, 2021

Army Pfc. Jimmy Rowland, 19

 Army Pfc. Jimmy Rowland, 19, BoonevillePrentiss CountyMississippi killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In July 1950, Rowland was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on July 16 while fighting North Korean forces along the Kum River north of Taejon, South Korea.

He was listed as Missing in Action while fighting the enemy in South Korea on July 16, 1950. He was presumed dead on December 31, 1953.

He was never found, nor were any remains recovered that could be identified as Rowland.

He was declared non-recoverable in January 1956.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Rowland memorialized at National Korean War Veterans Memorial Washington District of Columbia.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 8, 2021

Army Cpl. Kenneth R. Foreman, 19

Army Cpl. Kenneth R. Foreman, 19, of Mount Orab, Ohio, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Foreman was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces as they attempted to withdraw near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.


Foreman’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Foreman will be buried Dec. 2, 2021, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
November 8, 2021

Army Pvt. Archie V. Fleeman, 19, of Bell

Army Pvt. Archie V. Fleeman, 19, of Bell, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In late 1944, Fleeman was assigned to Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. His unit was part of the Hürtgen Forest offensive, near Hürtgen, Germany, where he was serving as a stretcher bearer for wounded troops. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 11. German forces never listed him as a prisoner of war. The War Department issued a presumptive finding of death on Nov. 12, 1945.

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was tasked with investigating and recovering missing American personnel in Europe. They conducted several investigations in the Hürtgen area between 1946 and 1950, but were unable to recover or identify Fleeman’s remains. He was declared non-recoverable in September 1951.

While studying unresolved American losses in the Hürtgen area, a DPAA historian determined that one set of unidentified remains, designated X-8117 St. Avold, originally discovered by a German team clearing landmines and unexploded ordnance from the woods in 1946, possibly belonged to Fleeman. The remains, which had been buried in Ardennes American Cemetery, were disinterred in August 2018 and sent to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and identification.

Fleeman’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the others still missing from World War II.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Fleeman will be buried in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The date has yet to be decided.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
November 3, 2021

Navy Seaman 1st Class Edward E. Talbert, 19

Navy Seaman 1st Class Edward E. Talbert, 19, of Albemarle, North Carolina, killed during World War II, was accounted for on Aug. 5, 2021.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Talbert was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Talbert.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Talbert.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Talbert’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Talbert will be buried on March 26, 2022, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
November 3, 2021

Army Pfc. Michaux Turbeville, 31

Army Pfc. Michaux Turbeville, 31, of Dillon, South Carolina, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In late 1950, Turbeville was a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces as they attempted to withdraw near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

North Korea turned over 55 boxes, purported to contain the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Aug. 1, 2018, and were subsequently accessioned into the DPAA laboratory for identification.

Turbeville’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Turbeville will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
November 1
, 2021

Marine Pfc. Walter L. Collier, 20

Marine Pfc. Walter L. Collier, 20, of Burbank, California, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Collier was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Collier.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Collier.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Collier’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Collier will be buried on Dec. 8, 2021, at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
October 29, 2021

Marine Corps Cpl. Andrew Pellerito, 22

Marine Corps Cpl. Andrew Pellerito, 22, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In November 1943, Pellerito was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, while the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Pellerito was killed on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20. His remains were reportedly buried in Cemetery 33.

In 1946, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company centralized all American remains found on Tarawa at Lone Palm Cemetery for later repatriation. Almost half of the known casualties were never found. The remains that were recovered were sent to Hawaii for analysis. Those that could not be identified or associated with one of the missing were buried as Unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, including one set designated Tarawa Unknown X-118. None of the recovered remains could be associated with Pellerito, and, in October 1949, a Board of Review declared him “non-recoverable.”

In 2009, History Flight, Inc., a nonprofit organization, discovered a burial site on Betio Island believed to be Cemetery 33, which has been the site of numerous excavations ever since. In 2014, possible human remains and identification media were found and were turned over to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, a DPAA predecessor.

At the end of 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-118 from the Punchbowl as part of an effort to identify the Tarawa Unknowns buried there. Scientific analysis determined that elements of the History Flight turnover were associated with X-118.

Pellerito’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific along with the others still missing from World War II.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Pellerito will be buried Nov. 30, 2021, in Augusta, Michigan.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 27, 2021

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Harold W. Lindsey, 26

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Harold W. Lindsey, 26, of San Antonio, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Lindsey was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Lindsey.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying Lindsey U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Lindsey.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Lindsey’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Lindsey will be buried on Nov. 5, 2021, in Dallas.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 25, 2021

U.S. Army Pvt. Robert J. Herynk, 27

U.S. Army Pvt. Robert J. Herynk, 27, of Hanover, Kansas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the fall of 1942, Herynk was assigned to K Company, 3rd Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division. His unit was part of the effort to cut off the Japanese supply and communications line coming from their beachhead at Sanananda Village, Territory of Papua, on the island of New Guinea. K Company attempted to work their way behind enemy lines, and, on Nov. 26, was part of a coordinated attack against Japanese defenses that would lead to the Huggins Roadblock being established a few days later.

Herynk was listed as killed in action on the earliest casualty reports and was reported to have been buried near Buna, New Guinea.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Service, the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel, conducted exhaustive searches of battle areas and crash sites in New Guinea, concluding their search in late 1948. Investigators could not find any evidence of Herynk. He was declared non-recoverable Dec. 19, 1949.

In March 1943, remains of an unidentified U.S. Soldier were recovered near the Soputa-Sanananda Track, but had no visible means of identification. Those remains were buried at a temporary cemetery in Sanananda. They were later disinterred and moved three times until being designated Unknown X-1547 Manila Mausoleum and buried at the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial in the Philippines on Jan. 18, 1950.

Between 1995 and 2012, DPAA predecessor organizations recovered four men from the Huggins Roadblock area, but found no trace of Herynk. DPAA historians and anthropologists later conducted a multidisciplinary review of Unknown and casualty files, and recommended disinterment of the Unknowns associated with the campaign to neutralize Japanese positions at Buna and Sanananda. X-1547 was disinterred in January 2017 and sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and analysis.

Herynk’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in the Philippines, along with others still missing from WWII.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Herynk will be buried Nov. 11, 2021, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 20, 2021

Navy Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Stein, 20

Navy Seaman 1st Class Walter C. Stein, 20, of Cheyenne, Wyoming, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Stein was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Stein.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Stein.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Stein’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autosomal DNA (auSTR) analysis.

Stein’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Stein will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, on March 23, 2022.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 20, 2021

Navy Fireman 1st Class James O. McDonald, 25

Navy Fireman 1st Class James O. McDonald, 25, of Levelland, Texas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, McDonald was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including McDonald.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including McDonald.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify McDonald’s remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

McDonald’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

McDonald will be buried at the NMCP in Honolulu on Jan. 19, 2022.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 20, 2021

Navy Mess Attendant 1st Class Octavius Mabine, 21

Navy Mess Attendant 1st Class Octavius Mabine, 21, of Portsmouth, Virginia, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Mabine was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Mabine.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Mabine.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.
¬
To identify Mabine’s remains, scientists from DPAA anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

Mabine’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Mabine will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be decided.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2021

Navy Ship’s Cook 1st Class Rodger C. Butts, 47

Navy Ship’s Cook 1st Class Rodger C. Butts, 47, of Portsmouth, Virginia, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Butts was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Butts.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Butts.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Butts’ remains, scientists from DPAA dental and anthropological analysis. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used Y chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

Butts’ name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Butts will be buried in Newtown, Pennsylvania. The date has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2021

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Hal J. Allison, 21

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Hal J. Allison, 21, Paducah, Ky. killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Allison was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Allison.

Allisons’ name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2021

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Edward E. Casinger, 21

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Edward E. Casinger, 21, Manhattan Kansas killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Casinger was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Casinger.

Casingers’ name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 19, 2021

Army Pvt. Emmet W. Schwartz, 24

Army Pvt. Emmet W. Schwartz, 24, of Dover, Ohio, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In December 1944, Schwartz was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division. His unit was part of an effort to capture Obermaubach, Germany, near the town of Hürtgen, when he was reported killed in action by an artillery blast on Dec. 27. His body was unable to be recovered.

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was tasked with investigating and recovering missing American personnel in Europe. They conducted several investigations in the Hürtgen area between 1946 and 1950, but were unable to recover or identify Schwartz’s remains. He was declared non-recoverable in December 1951.

While studying unresolved American losses in the Hürtgen area, a DPAA historian determined that one set of unidentified remains, designated X-7173 St. Avold, originally recovered from a foxhole near Obermaubach by the AGRC in 1946, possibly belonged to Schwartz. The remains, which had been buried in Rhône American Cemetery in Draguignan, France, were disinterred in June 2019 and sent to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and identification.

To identify Schwartz’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Schwartz’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the others still missing from World War II.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Schwartz will be buried Nov. 18, 2021, in New Philadelphia, Ohio.

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 19, 2021

Army Cpl. Robert C. Agard, Jr., 19

Army Cpl. Robert C. Agard, Jr., 19, of Buffalo, New York, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In July 1950, Agard was a member of 2nd Platoon, 24th Reconnaissance Company, 24th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on July 19 while conducting a night recon patrol with his unit near Taejon, South Korea. He was never found, nor were any remains recovered that could be identified as Agard. He was declared non-recoverable in January 1956.

A set of remains, designated Unknown X-311 Taejon, was found near Daebyeol-dong, a village near Taejon, along with the remains of two members of Agard’s unit, in December 1950. However, X-311 could not be identified. The remains were later transported with all of the unidentified Korean War remains and buried as Unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

In July 2018, DPAA historians and anthropologists proposed a plan to disinter and identify the 652 Korean War unknown burials from the Punchbowl, including 53 recovered from the Taejon area. X-311 was disinterred June 10, 2019, as part of the Korean War Identification Project, and transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Agard’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Agard’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Agard will be buried May 30, 2022, in Elmira, New York.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 18, 2021

Army Staff Sgt. William R. Linder, 30

Army Staff Sgt. William R. Linder, 30, of Piedmont, South Carolina, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In late 1944, Linder was assigned to Company E, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. His unit was part of the Hürtgen Forest offensive, near Hürtgen, Germany, when he was reported missing in action on Nov. 16. German forces never listed him as a prisoner of war. The War Department issued a presumptive finding of death on Nov. 17, 1945.

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was tasked with investigating and recovering missing American personnel in Europe. They conducted several investigations in the Hürtgen area between 1946 and 1950, but were unable to recover or identify Linder’s remains. He was declared non-recoverable in December 1951.

While studying unresolved American losses in the Hürtgen area, a DPAA historian determined that one set of unidentified remains, designated X-5431 Neuville, originally discovered by local residents shortly after a forest fire swept through the area in 1947, possibly belonged to Linder. The remains, which had been buried in Ardennes American Cemetery, were disinterred in April 2019 and sent to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and identification.

To identify Linder’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental and anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome DNA (Y-STR) analysis.

Linder’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, along with the others still missing from World War II.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Linder will be buried Oct. 29, 2021, in Anderson, South Carolina.

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
October 12, 2021

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Alan E. Petersen, 23

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Alan E. Petersen, 23, of Brownton, Minnesota, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1943, Petersen was assigned to the 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force. On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24 Liberator aircraft on which Petersen was serving as a bombardier crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation TIDAL WAVE, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti, north of Bucharest, Romania. His remains were not identified following the war. The remains that could not be identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel, disinterred all American remains from the Bolovan Cemetery for identification. The AGRC was unable to identify more than 80 unknowns from Bolovan Cemetery, and those remains were permanently interred at Ardennes American Cemetery and Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, both in Belgium.

In 2017, DPAA began exhuming unknowns believed to be associated with unaccounted for airmen from Operation TIDAL WAVE losses. These remains were sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for examination and identification.

Petersen’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Impruneta, Italy,
along with others still missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Petersen will be buried Oct. 30, 2021, in Glencoe, Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

USS California Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 12, 2021

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Pete Turk, 20

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Pete Turk, 20, Cherokee County, Kansas killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Turk was assigned to the battleship USS California, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS California sustained multiple torpedo and bomb hits, which caused it catch fire and slowly flood.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 104 crewmen, including Turk.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Pete Turk is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 8, 2021

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Charles L. Saunders, 18

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Charles L. Saunders, 18, of Winnie, Texas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Saunders was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Saunders.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Saunders.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Saunders’ name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Saunders will be buried Dec. 7, 2021, in his hometown.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 7, 2021

Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Harold F. Carney, 23

Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Harold F. Carney, 23, of New Diggings, Wisconsin, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Carney was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Carney.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Carney.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Carney’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Carney will be buried Nov. 6, 2021, in Benton, Wisconsin.

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
October 5, 2021

U.S. Army Air Forces Sgt. Francis W. Wiemerslage, 20

U.S. Army Air Forces Sgt. Francis W. Wiemerslage, 20, of River Grove, Illinois, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In March 1945, Wiemerslage was assigned to the 549th Bombardment Squadron, 385th Bombardment Group, 8th Air Force, serving in Germany. He was the ball turret gunner on a B-17G Flying Fortress bomber during a bombing mission over Dresden, on March 2. Enemy fighters attacked the bomber between Berlin and Leipzig, and the plane was shot down. Two of the nine crew members survived the incident, while the rest, including Wiemerslage, were killed. Seven men were reportedly recovered from the wreckage and buried near Züllsdorf. After the war ended, there was no evidence of Wiemerslage being a prisoner of war or having survived, so a Finding of Death was issued a year after the crash.

The American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was charged with recovering the remains of fallen service members in the European Theater following the war. During a series of investigations of the Züllsdorf area between 1947 and 1949, the remains of all of the airmen who died in the B-17 crash, except for Wiemerslage, were found and identified. After 1950, worsening diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union, who controlled this part of Germany at the time, prevented the AGRC from investigating further. In November 1953, two German citizens conducted another search of the area on behalf of the AGRC, finding some bones, including the jaw with some teeth, and part of a wallet. However, it does not appear any further evidence was found. Wiermerslage’s records from the time indicate the dental record was favorable and the wallet bore the initials “F.W.” In March 1954, the remains were interred, to be held until the recovery of additional remains could be completed.

In June 2019, DPAA contracted Western Carolina University to excavate several possible locations around the area of Züllsdorf where the remains and wallet were found in the 1950s. Possible osseous material and possible material evidence was found and initially transferred to the Brandenburg Institute for Forensic Medicine before being sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for scientific analysis.

Wiemerslage’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Hombourg, Belgium,
along with the others still missing from World War II.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Wiemerslage will be buried in his hometown on Oct. 23, 2021.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 5, 2021

 Navy Seaman 2nd Class Joseph M. Robertson, 18

 Navy Seaman 2nd Class Joseph M. Robertson, 18, Covington, Ky killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Robertson was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

 The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Robertson.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Joseph M. Robertson name is inscribed on the Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
October 5, 2021

Army Cpl. Marvin D. Actkinson, 18

Army Cpl. Marvin D. Actkinson, 18, Brownfield, Terry, Texas,  killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Actkinson was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces as they attempted to withdraw near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 Marvin D. Actkinson name is inscribed on the Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.

 

 

 

 

Pilot killed From World War II Accounted For
October 5, 2021

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Gabriel J. Eggud, 25

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Gabriel J. Eggud, 25, of New York, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1944, Eggud was a pilot assigned to the 110th Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter), 71st Reconnaissance Group. On July 6, he was piloting a P-39 Airacobra fighter on a combat mission over Wewak, New Guinea, when a released bomb exploded and destroyed his aircraft. Efforts to recover Eggud’s remains were unsuccessful.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Service, the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel, conducted exhaustive searches of battle areas and crash sites in New Guinea, concluding their search in late 1948. Investigators could not find any evidence of Eggud or his aircraft. He was declared non-recoverable Sept. 20, 1949.

Between 2001 and 2019, DPAA and its predecessor organizations conducted several investigation and recovery missions in near Wewak, Papua New Guinea. A recovery team in 2019 found possible human remains, possible material evidence, possible life-support equipment, and diagnostic and non-diagnostic aircraft wreckage including cockpit plexiglass, a rudder pedal, a cockpit door handle, a brake control unit, and instrument panel components. At the end of Sept. 2019, all evidence was sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for identification.

Eggud’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in the Philippines,
along with others still missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Eggud will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. The date has yet to be decided.

 

 

 

 

Airmen  killed From World War II Accounted For
October 5, 2021

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Jack K. Wood, 24

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Jack K. Wood, 24, of Wichita Falls, Texas, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In the summer of 1943, Wood was assigned to the 344th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force. On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24 Liberator aircraft on which Wood was serving as a navigator crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation TIDAL WAVE, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti, north of Bucharest, Romania. His remains were not identified following mission. Remains that could not be identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), the organization that searched for and recovered fallen American personnel, disinterred all American remains from the Bolovan Cemetery for identification. The AGRC was unable to identify more than 80 unknowns from Bolovan Cemetery, and those remains were permanently interred at Ardennes American Cemetery and Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, both in Belgium.

In 2017, DPAA began exhuming unknowns believed to be associated with unaccounted for airmen from Operation TIDAL WAVE losses.

Wood’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Impruneta, Italy,
along with others still missing from WWII.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Wood will be buried Oct. 23, 2021, in Madill, Oklahoma.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
October 4, 2021

Navy Fireman 1st Class Denis H. Hiskett, 20

Navy Fireman 1st Class Denis H. Hiskett, 20, of Nebraska City, Nebraska, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Hiskett was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Hiskett.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Hiskett.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Hiskett’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Hiskett will be buried on Dec. 11, 2021, in Mission Hills, California.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
October 1, 2021

U.S. Army Pvt. Robert J. Herynk, 27

U.S. Army Pvt. Robert J. Herynk, 27, Washington County, Kansas killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In the fall of 1942, Herynk was assigned to the K Company, 3rd Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division.

His unit was part of the effort to cut off the Japanese supply and communications line coming from their beachhead at Sanananda Village, Territory of Papua, on the island of New Guinea.

K Company attempted to work their way behind enemy lines, and, on Nov. 26, was part of a coordinated attack against Japanese defenses
that would lead to the Huggins Roadblock being established a few days later.

Herynk was listed as killed in action on the earliest casualty reports and was reported to have been buried near Buna, New Guinea.

Robert J Herynk is memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines. 

Herynk was buried at HanoverWashington CountyKansas.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen  killed From World War II Accounted For
September 30, 2021

U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Richard G. Salsbury, 19

U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Richard G. Salsbury, 19, CanaanSomerset CountyMaine killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In the summer of 1943, Salsbury was assigned to the 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force.

On Aug. 1, 1943, the B-24 Liberator aircraft on which Salsbury was serving as a gunner crashed as a result of enemy anti-aircraft fire during Operation TIDAL WAVE, the largest bombing mission against the oil fields and refineries at Ploiesti, north of Bucharest, Romania.

His remains were not identified following the war.

The remains that could not be identified were buried as Unknowns in the Hero Section of the Civilian and Military Cemetery of Bolovan, Ploiesti, Prahova, Romania.

Salsbury was buried at CanaanSomerset CountyMaine.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 28, 2021

Navy Hospital Apprentice 1st Class Keefe R. Connolly, 19

Navy Hospital Apprentice 1st Class Keefe R. Connolly, 19, of Markesan, Wisconsin, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Connolly was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Connolly.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Connolly.

Between June and November 2015, DPAA personnel exhumed the USS Oklahoma Unknowns from the Punchbowl for analysis.

Connolly’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from WWII.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Connolly will be buried Nov. 8, 2021, in his hometown.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
September 28, 2021

Army Pfc. Don D. Dowler, Jr., 18

Army Pfc. Don D. Dowler, Jr., 18, San Joaquin County, California killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

In late 1950, Dowler was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.

He was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after his unit was attacked by enemy forces as they attempted to withdraw near the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea.

 Following the battle, his remains could not be recovered.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Don D Dowler Jr Don is remembered at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, and is buried or memorialized at Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial. 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 28, 2021

Navy Fireman 1st Class James O. McDonald, 25

Navy Fireman 1st Class James O. McDonald, 25, from Texas was killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, McDonald was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including McDonald.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

James O. McDonald is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
September 28, 2021

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Laverne A. Nigg, 23

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Laverne A. Nigg, 23, Roberts County, South Dakota killed during World War II, was accounted for.

(Official release will be updated following the primary next of kin briefing.)

On Dec. 7, 1941, Nigg was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize.

The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Nigg.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Laverne Alious Nigg is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
September 23, 2021

U.S. Army 1st Lt. James E. Wright, 25

U.S. Army 1st Lt. James E. Wright, 25, of Parkton, North Carolina, killed during World War II, was accounted for.

In September 1944, Wright was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 11th Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division. They were part of Lt. Gen. George S. Patton’s Third Army and had been fighting across France that summer before being stopped by fierce German opposition at the Moselle River near Dornot. On the morning of Sept. 8, Wright’s unit was part of a larger force ordered to cross the river and take up a position in the woods on the east side. They dug their defensive positions in a curved line at the edge of the forest they called Horseshoe Woods. The force held their position against a relentless German attack, taking heavy losses, until Sept. 10, when another crossing of the Moselle was made. Only then were they allowed to retreat. That night and into the morning of Sept. 11 most of the Soldiers were able to retreat across the river, though some officers stayed behind to search the woods for the wounded or missing before recrossing the river.

Wright was among the Soldiers reported missing that night. His body was unable to be recovered because of the fighting and German presence on east side of the river.

The American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) was charged with recovering the remains of fallen service members in the European Theater following the war. Although some unknown remains were found in and around Horseshoe Woods, none were associated with Wright. AGRC continued operations along the banks of the Moselle until 1951. At that point, Wright was declared non-recoverable.

In 2012, a private researcher for the 7th Armored Division Association suggested one of the unknowns recovered from the Horseshoe Woods, known as X-46 Hamm and buried in Luxembourg American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Hamm, Luxembourg, could be a match to a Soldier from Wright’s unit or the 7th Armored Division. After extensive research and record comparison by DPAA historians and analysts, X-46 was disinterred in May 2016 and sent to the DPAA Laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, for identification.

Wright’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Lorraine American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in St. Avold, France, along with others still missing from WWII.

 A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Wright will be buried Oct. 12, 2021, in Lumber Bridge, North Carolina.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
September 23, 2021

Army Pvt. Donald A. Fabrize, 17

Army Pvt. Donald A. Fabrize, 17, of Cayuga, New York, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for.

In July 1950, Fabrize was a member of Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was reported killed in action on July 16 during battle defending, then withdrawing from, positions along the Kum River in South Korea. His remains could not be immediately located or recovered. The Army deemed Fabrize non-recoverable on Jan. 16, 1956.

A set of remains, designated Unknown X-36 Taejon, buried in the United Nations Military Cemetery (UNMC) at Taejon, in the vicinity of the Kum River, sometime between July and September 1950 was repeatedly examined during and just after the war to attempt an identification, but ultimately was designated unidentifiable. The remains were later transported with all of the unidentified Korean War remains and buried as Unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, also known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

In July 2018, DPAA historians and anthropologists proposed a plan to disinter and identify the 652 Korean War unknown burials from the Punchbowl, including 53 recovered from the UNMC Taejon and Taejon area. X-36 was disinterred July 16, 2019, as part of the Korean War Identification Project, and transferred to the DPAA Laboratory at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

To identify Fabrize’s remains, scientists from DPAA used dental, anthropological, and chest radiograph analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence. Additionally, scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis.

Fabrize’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are still missing from the Korean War.

A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Fabrize will be buried in May 2022 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor killed From World War I