RECENTLY FOUND HEROES

 

from ALL PAST WARS

 

 

HONOR THE DEAD BY HELPING THE LIVING”

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

"Returning with Honor"
March 03, 2017

KHAMMOUANE, Laos --

With 1,614 service members missing in action from the Vietnam War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) deploys hundreds of service members,
DoD civilians, and contractors all over the world in hopes of returning our nation’s fallen heroes.

Recently a team of 59 personnel completed DPAA’s second Laos mission of fiscal year 2017, covering the Central East region of Laos. From rice patties to mountainsides,
the teams excavated thousands of square meters of land recovering important evidence relating to missing servicemen lost during the war.

“I’m very honored to have been part of this initiative to bring our missing home,” said U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chris Walgenbach,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “This mission has been the most unique part of my 13 year career in the military and I know others feel the same way.”

Every team member plays an important role in mission success. Whether that is the recovery non-commissioned officer setting up the sites,
or the recovery leader collecting scientific data, working together ensures nothing is overlooked and the safety of the team remains number one priority.

Due to the efforts of the teams, Laos representatives handed over possible remains to the U.S. to be repatriated and welcomed back on American soil after 48 years.
Upon arrival the possible remains will be transported to DPAA’s laboratory for examination and possible identification.

“During this mission I have worked along side some of the greatest men and women I’ve had the pleasure of meeting,
and being chosen for the repatriation ceremony was a perfect way to end such a great mission,” said U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Andrew Brod,
recovery non-commissioned officer. “It is truly an honor to be bringing closure to the families of our fallen service members.”

The hard work and continued dedication of these teams makes it possible for DPAA to fulfill our nations promise and
provide fullest possible accounting for our missing service members to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Ameil Fredeluces, edic, and U.S. Marine Corps. Staff Sgt. Eddie Ludwig, explosive ordinance disposal technician,
remove dirt from units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos,
January 29, 2017.  Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual
reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting
for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency dig units during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 26, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing
U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago. DPAA’s mission is to provide the
fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Jack Kenkeo, life support investigator, shovels dirt from the screening stations during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s
mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Francis Sangiamvongse, linguist, screens soil with local villagers during excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA
Accounting Agency’s mission in the Khammouane Province, Laos, January 29, 2017. Recovery Team Three executed excavation operations in search
of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

Lynn Rakos, scientific recovery expert, waters hard soil to help with excavation operations as part of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s mission
in the Khammovan Province, Laos, January 23, 2017. Recovery Team three executed excavation operations in search of two missing U.S. Air Force pilots
who crashed while on a visual reconnaissance mission during the Vietnam War over 48 years ago.
DPAA’s mission is to provide the fullest possible accounting for our missing personnel to their families and the nation.

 

In March of 2017, Making the effort to thank the troops for what they do out in the field means everything.
With a DPAA recovery team in Quang Nam Province, two hours west of Da Nang, Vietnam.

 

 

Disappearance of two Madison airmen in 1953 remains a mystery

The unsolved case called "one of the most enduring mysteries of the Great Lakes"
has been the subject of numerous articles and a film on Canadian television.

The UW-Madison story involved a group of six students and staff members who were part of a team that unearthed a World War II U.S. fighter aircraft—
and possibly remains of its pilot—in the ground under a farm field in France this summer.

The team used ground-penetrating radar and a photo taken by a British reconnaissance plane two days after the May, 1944
crash of the P-47 Thunderbolt flown by 1st Lt. Frank Fazekas.

 

 

 

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II

Search underway for Lakewood, Ohio airman of World War II.
Divers of the U.S. Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and Civil Defense of Grado, Italy,
prepare for an exploratory dive on the sunken B-24 bomber. 

This B-24 Liberator is the same type of airplane that
Lakewood, Ohio airman Thomas McGraw was flying in when it was shot down and crashed off the coast of Italy during World War II.

A Missing Air Crew Report details the last flight of the B-24 and nose gunner Thomas McGraw of Lakewood, Ohio.
B-24 located in Adriatic; Crewmanis bones sought Ught Lakewood Manis remains crewman Omber crew,am2-2k-28 bold Header from A1.
 

A skull fragment was recovered at the site of a wrecked B-24 bomber
off the coast of Italy that may contain the remains of
Thomas McGraw, of Lakewood, Ohio.

An underwater view of the crash site of a B-24 off Grado, Italy.

 

 

 

FINDING ENSIGN HAROLD P. DeMOSS IN THE MUCK AND MIRE

“Seeing those photos was so overwhelming that I cried like a baby”
said DeMoss’ niece, Judy Ivey. “To see this actually taking place
is not anything I ever really expected.”

Anine-person military team has been digging up mud four days a week
in the Koolau range in search of a missing World War II pilot whose
fighter crashed in cloud cover during a night training flight.

A bucket-and-pulley system was set up to move excavated
material to a spot where it can be bundled in tarps for
helicopter transport to Wheeler Army Airfield.

NOTE: The Navy’s Bureau of Medicine and Surgery said in a 1948 letter
to the family that “an attempt to recover the remains was
considered impracticable” because the site was 7 miles
from a traveled highway in the mountains.

 

 

 

 

 

On Feb. 25, 1944, Duran wasn’t supposed to be on the doomed B-24H Liberator, nicknamed “Knock it Off.”
Normally a nose turret gunner, Duran was the substitute tail turret gunner on the flight, replacing the usual tail gunner who had frostbite.

 

The earth by the headstone next to the church in this tiny mountain village was full of rocks.

 

Two days of digging under a hot sun had yielded buckets of gravel, stones the size of men’s fists and many piles of dirt – but no bones.
After 73 years, Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran was still missing.

The family feels a sense of closure regardless of the outcome, Duran said.
“What a difference it would have made to my father and to my aunt,”
she said, “to know he had died and somebody had buried him and tended the grave.”

 

 


 

USS Arizona BB-39

USS Arizona was a Pennsylvania-class battleship built for and by the United States Navy in the mid-1910s. Named in honor of the 48th state's recent admission into the union, the ship was the second and last of the Pennsylvania class of "super-dreadnought" battleships. Although commissioned in 1916, the ship remained stateside during World War I. Shortly after the end of the war, Arizona was one of a number of American ships that briefly escorted President Woodrow Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference. The ship was sent to Turkey in 1919 at the beginning of the Greco-Turkish War to represent American interests for several months. Several years later, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet and remained there for the rest of her career.

Aside from a comprehensive modernization in 1929–31, 
Arizona was regularly used for training exercises between the wars, including the annual Fleet Problems (training exercises). When an earthquake struck Long Beach, California, in 1933, Arizona's crew provided aid to the survivors. Two years later, the ship was featured in a Jimmy Cagney film, Here Comes the Navy, about the romantic troubles of a sailor. In April 1940, she and the rest of the Pacific Fleet were transferred from California to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as a deterrent to Japanese imperialism.

During the 
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Arizona was bombed. After a bomb detonated in a powder magazine, the battleship exploded violently and sank, killing 1,177 officers and crewmen. Unlike many of the other ships sunk or damaged that day, Arizona was irreparably damaged by the force of the magazine explosion, though the Navy removed parts of the ship for reuse. The wreck still lies at the bottom of Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona Memorial, dedicated on 30 May 1962 to all those who died during the attack, straddles the ship's hull.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma BB-37 

The USS Oklahoma was on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. That was the morning that the Japanese Empire attacked the United States by surprise.

The Japanese used dive–bombers, fighter–bombers, and torpedo planes to sink nine ships, including five battleships, and severely damage 21 ships.
There were 2,402 US deaths from the attack. 1,177 of those deaths were from the USS Arizona, while 429 of the deaths were from the USS Oklahoma.

The crew of the USS Oklahoma did everything they could to fight back. In the first ten minutes of the battle, though, eight torpedoes hit the Oklahoma, and she began to capsize.  A ninth torpedo would hit her as she sunk in the mud.  14 Marines, and 415 sailors would give their lives. 32 men were cut out through the hull while the others were beneath the waterline.  Banging could be heard for over 3 days and then there was silence.

After the battle, the Navy decided that they could not salvage the Oklahoma due to how much damage she had received.  The difficult savage job began in March 1943, and Oklahoma entered dry dock 28 December. Decommissioning  September 1, 1944, Oklahoma was stripped of guns and superstructure, and sold December 5, 1946 to Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif. Oklahoma parted her tow line and sank May 17, 1947.  540 miles out, bound from Pearl Harbor to San Francisco.  Today, there is a memorial to the USS Oklahoma and the 429 sailors and marines lost on December 7, 1941, located on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

Ford Island is seen in this aerial view during the Japanese attack on Pearl harbor December 7, 1941 in Hawaii.
(The photo was taken from a Japanese plane.)

 

 

Remember the fallen: In all, 429 people on board the battleship were killed in the attack.
Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.

 

 

Battleship USS Oklahoma unturned hull at the bottom of Pearl Harbor
after the devastating Japanese bombing attack on Dec. 7, 1941.

 

                                                                                                                      

 

 

                                                                                                   The North Texans of Pearl Harbor
                                                                                                      

                                                                                       Their obituaries tell of lives cut short – and of lives well lived.

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Memorial at Pearl Harbor

 

 

 

 

 

THE KOREAN WAR, 1950-1957

 

 

 

 

 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following WWII from MICHIGAN - 2471
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Korea from MICHIGAN - 341
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Cold War from MICHIGAN - 4
 

Service Personnel Not Recovered Following Viet Nam from MICHIGAN - 48
 

 


 

RECENTLY FOUND
 HEROES in 2018

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
August 21
, 2018

Army Pvt. William A. Boegli,

Army Pvt. William A. Boegli, from Park County, Montana killed during World War II, was accounted for on August 14.

In September 1944, Boegli was a member of Company L, 332nd Infantry Regiment, 81st Infantry Division, invading Angaur Island in the Palau Island chain. After Boegli’s regiment successfully captured Red Beach on the northeastern shore, they pushed westward across the island. On Sept. 30, 1944, Boegli was killed while attempting to lead a group of litter bearers to evacuate wounded servicemen. His remains were not recovered following the war.

There may be other awards received we do not have records of. Silver Star  Bronze Star  Purple Heart  Combat Infantryman Badge  American Campaign Medal World War II Victory Medal

Interment services are pending; a formal notification will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission and the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial for their partnership in this mission.

Boegli's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery site along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown, Boegli’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for. 

 

Currently there are 73,151 service members still unaccounted for from World War II.

 

 

 

Soldier Captured and Killed During the Korean War Accounted For
August 21
, 2018

Army Pfc. Kenneth B. Williams,

Army Pfc. Kenneth B. Williams, captured and killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on August 13. 

In late November 1950, Williams was a member of Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Williams was reported missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, after he was last seen near the Chosin Reservoir.

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Williams' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

Today, 7,618 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War.

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
August 20
, 2018

Army Air Forces Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran, 22, of El Rito, New Mexico, accounted for on May 22, will be buried August 22 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In February 1944, Duran was a nose gunner on a B-24H Liberator, assigned to the 724th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 451st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force. On February 25, 1944, the final day of Operation Argument, Duran’s aircraft came under attack by German fighters and anti-aircraft fire, while he was on a bombing mission targeting Regensburg, Germany. The tail gunner in another aircraft witnessed a direct hit on Duran’s aircraft, which tore off a section of the right wing. Nine of the ten crew members were able to bail from the aircraft before it crashed. The tail gunner from Duran’s aircraft reported he had last seen Duran alive in the aircraft, but believed Duran did not bail out. All nine of Duran’s crewmates survived the bail out and were captured and interrogated in Verona, Italy, where they were told that one body had been found in the aircraft wreckage. The crash site was reported to be located near Ljubljana, Slovenia, an area then under Axis control.

Following the war, the American Graves Registration Service, Mediterranean Zone, of the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, searched for the remains of U.S. service personnel in Europe, as part of the global effort to identify and return them for honored burial. No remains could be associated with Duran, and he was declared deceased as of Feb. 25, 1944.

In 2006, analysts began research on Duran’s loss after receiving information concerning a B-24 Liberator that had reportedly crashed near the village of Pokojišče, municipality of Vrhnika, Slovenia. A team from the Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office, a predecessor of DPAA, visited the alleged crash site in 2012 and interviewed residents who reported the remains of an unidentified Allied airman from that crash site were initially buried along the side wall of Saint Stephens Church in Pokojišče, and that the grave was regularly tended to by Mrs. Tončka Dragar, who cordoned it off with stones and regularly laid flowers on the mound. 

The team was then shown a headstone erected in 1962 at the back of Saint Stephens Church, indicating that the unidentified Allied airman, by then portrayed as an Australian airman, had been reburied together with four Partisan soldiers, two of whom were also unidentified. 

In 2016, with information provided by several private Slovenain researchers, DPAA concluded that the remains were likely those of Duran. Because there was a possibility that the remains were of an Australian, DPAA invited the collaboration of the Office of Australian War Graves Commission (OAWG) and Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Directorate of History and Heritage. 

Upon concurrence from the OAWG and RAAF, and with the gracious permission of Father Janez Šiler, the Parish Priest of St. Stephens, the families of the Partisan soldiers believed to have been buried in the alleged mass grave, the Slovenian Ministry of Labor, Family, Social Affairs, and Equal Opportunities, and the Institute for Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, in July 2017 a DPAA recovery team excavated several alleged burial sites adjacent to the church in Pokojišče, recovering possible osseous remains. 

To identify Duran’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental and anthropological analysis, as well as material and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
August 17
, 2018

Army Pfc. Morris R. Worrell,

Army Pfc. Morris R. Worrell, captured and killed during World War II, was accounted for on August 13. 

On Dec. 8, 1941, Worrell was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, when Japanese forces invaded the Philippine Islands. Intense fighting continued until the surrender of the Bataan peninsula on April 9, 1942, and of the Corregidor Island on May 6, 1942. Thousands of U.S. and Filipino service members were taken prisoner; including many who were forced to endure the Bataan Death March, en route to Japanese prisoner of war (POW) camps, including the POW camp at Cabanatuan on the island of Luzon, Philippines. Worrell was among those reported captured after the surrender of Corregidor and who were eventually moved to the Cabanatuan POW camp. More than 2,500 POWs perished in this camp during the remaining years of the war. 

Interment services are pending; a formal notification will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

DPAA is appreciative to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this mission.

Worrell's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery site along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
August 16
, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr., 21

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Herman W. Mulligan, Jr., 21, of West Greenville, South Carolina, accounted for on February 20, will be buried August 21 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On May 30, 1945, Mulligan was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division, engaged in heavy fighting against Japanese forces on Hill 27, on the northern bank of the Kokuba Estuary, Okinawa, Japan. A large crypt loaded with ammunition exploded, wounding dozens and killing Mulligan.

The remains of most Americans killed during the fighting in Okinawa were transported to six cemeteries that had been established shortly after American forces landed on the island. The American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) attempted to bury fallen service members in the cemetery of their division, but due to the large number of casualties, deceased were often sent to various unit cemeteries. The disposition of Pfc. Mulligan’s remains was initially unknown.

Following the war, the AGRS searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. servicemen in the Pacific area as part of a global effort to identify and return fallen servicemen. Investigators at the time could not associate Mulligan’s medical or dental records with any unidentified remains found in Okinawa. Additionally, there was no record of his burial.

By August 1948, more than 10,000 remains were disinterred from Okinawa and shipped to Saipan prior to being shipped to Manila. In September 1949, one set of unidentified remains, X-35, was classified as unidentifiable and interred in the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial in the Philippines.

In May 2017, following thorough historical research and analysis of unit records and AGRS recovery reports, X-35 was disinterred and accessioned to DPAA for scientific testing.

To identify Mulligan’s remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), as well as anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Killed From World War II Accounted For
August 16
, 2018

Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn, 43,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn, 43, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, accounted for on Nov. 17, 2017, will be buried August 21 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. On Dec. 7, 1941, Glenn’s 43rd birthday, he was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Glenn. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Glenn.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Glenn’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, along with circumstantial evidence. Glenn was the 100th identification made by DPAA of the USS Oklahoma casualties.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Marine Killed From World War II Accounted For
August 16
, 2018

Marine Corps Pfc. Robert K. Holmes, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from World War II are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Pfc. Robert K. Holmes, 19, of Wichita, Kansas, accounted for on May 9, will be buried August 20 in Salt Lake City Utah. On Dec. 7, 1941, Holmes was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Holmes.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Holmes.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for identification.

To identify Holmes’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 16
, 2018

Army Pfc. George L. Spangenberg,

Army Pfc. George L. Spangenberg, from Butler, Pennsylvania, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on August 14.

In November 1950, Spangenberg was a member of Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was reported missing in action on Nov. 2, 1950 following a battle in Unsan, North Korea, the days prior. Spangengberg’s name was never included on lists of American Soldiers being held as prisoners of war by the Korean People’s Army (KPA) or the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF,) and no returned American prisoners of war had any information on his status. 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and looks forward to the continued fulfillment of the commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Spangenberg's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 15
, 2018

Army Pfc. Mathis O. Ball, Jr. 20

 

Army Pfc. Mathis O. Ball, Jr., 20, from Texas, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on August 14.

In July 1950, Ball was a member of Company M, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North Korean forces near Choch’iwon, South Korea. Ball could not be accounted-for and was declared missing in action on July 12, 1950.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Ball's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
August 15
, 2018

Navy Aviation Chief Ordnanceman Otis E. Ingram, 28

Navy Aviation Chief Ordnanceman Otis E. Ingram, 28, PensacolaFlorida, killed during World War II, was accounted for on June 25, 2018.

On July 27, 1944, Ingram was a turret gunner aboard a torpedo bomber from U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty One (VT-51). Ingram’s aircraft was the lead of four Avengers on a mission targeting the Japanese base at Malakal Harbor. The aircraft was last observed three to five miles ahead of the other aircraft, at the beginning of the attack. Witnesses observed an object, believed to be an aircraft, on fire in Malakal Harbor. All three servicemen on board, including Ingram, were reported missing in action and subsequently presumed dead on Feb. 4, 1946.

DPAA is grateful to the government of Palau and Bent Prop for their partnership in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Ingram’s name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 10
, 2018

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, 20, of Seminary, Kentucky, accounted for on July 3, will be buried August 18 in Albany, Kentucky. In late November, 1950, Elmore was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because Elmore could not be accounted for by his unit, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

Elmore’s name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning Americans reported him as a prisoner of war. Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of May 1, 1953.

On Oct. 19, 1995, during a United Nations Command/Korean People’s Army meeting at Panmunjom, the KPA offered to repatriate the remains of a British soldier killed during the Korean War. The KPA identified the remains to be Pvt. J. Edmunds, who was reportedly found by a KPA work crew in July 1995, near Wangsan, Rimkangni, Kaesong City. The remains were handed over on Oct. 30, 1995, and the British government asked DPAA’s predecessors to identify the remains.

On Feb. 28, 1996, the remains were declared unidentifiable. 

On Sept. 1, 1997, the British Army Headquarters Adjutant General, Personnel and Training Command, sent a request to the Adjutant General, U.S. Army Personnel Command, requesting the remains be returned for burial in Busan, South Korea, during the visit of the British Korean Veterans Association to Korea in April 1998. The remains were transferred to the custody of British authorities and were buried in a grave marked as “British Unknown.”

Following the institution of the Korean War Project, DPAA was able to associate the unknown remains with two missing U.S. service members. 

In November 2017, the remains were disinterred by the 8th Army Mortuary, U.S. Forces Korea and transported to DPAA.

To identify Elmore’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
August 10
, 2018

 

Army Air Forces Capt. George Van Vleet, Jr., 35,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Capt. George Van Vleet, Jr., 35, of Fresno, California, accounted for on March 19, will be buried August 18 in his hometown. On Jan. 21, 1944, Van Vleet was a member of the 38th Bombardment Squadron, (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group, stationed at Hawkins Field, Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, when the B-24J bomber aircraft he was aboard crashed shortly after take-off. 

Following the crash, the squadron’s physician recovered the remains of six individuals who died in the crash and interred them in Cemetery No. 33 on Betio Island, one of several cemeteries established on the island. 

Following the war, the U.S. Army’s 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio between 1946 and 1947. Using Marine Corps records, they began the task of consolidating all the remains from isolated burial sites into a single cemetery called Lone Palm Cemetery. The remains of the crew on the B-24J bomber were believed to be among those moved, however Van Vleet’s remains were not identified and he was declared non-recoverable.

On Nov. 7, 2016, DPAA disinterred Tarawa Unknown X-014 from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

In May 2017, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., DPAA returned to Betio to conduct excavations of remains of men buried after the battle. One set of remains was consolidated with the remains disinterred from X-014 and was sent to the lab for analysis.

To identify Van Vleet’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, dental, and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 8
, 2018

Army Pfc. Leo J. Duquette,

Army Pfc. Leo J. Duquette, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on Aug. 8, 2018.

In July 1950, Duquette was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North Korean forces near Choch’iwon, South Korea. Duquette could not be accounted-for and was declared missing in action on July 11, 1950.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Duquette’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 8
, 2018

Army Pfc. John A. Taylor,


Army Pfc. John A. Taylor, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for May 9, 2018.

In August 1950, Taylor was a member of Company C, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division in South Korea. On Aug. 11, his regiment encountered a Korean People’s Army unit near the village of Haman. Taylor’s company was ordered to move southwest, where they were ambushed and forced to disperse. In the days following, the battalions of 24th Infantry Regiment consolidated their positions, reorganized and began accounting for their Soldiers. After several days of checking adjoining units, aid stations and field hospitals, Taylor was reported as killed in action on Aug. 12, 1950, but his remains were not recovered.
DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Taylor’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
August 8
, 2018

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Martin F. O’Callaghan, Jr.

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Martin F. O’Callaghan, Jr., killed during World War II, was accounted for on April 24, 2018.

In February 1945, O’Callaghan was a pilot with the 96th Fighter Squadron, 82nd Fighter Group, on a mission to strafe targets near Maribor, Yugoslavia, now Slovenia. While attacking locomotives near a railway station, O’Callaghan’s P-38 Lightning aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire. He radioed his squadron-mates to say that he might attempt to bail out of the aircraft, however, according to witnesses, he attempted to land the aircraft in a field southeast of Maribor. As he was attempting to land, the aircraft inverted, crashed and burst into flames. Because Yugoslavia was an occupied territory at the time, no immediate search for his remains could be conducted.
DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

O’Callaghan’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Impruneta, Italy, along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an "unknown”, his grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle Monuments Commission.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 8
, 2018

Army Master Sgt. Carl H. Lindquist, 33

Army Master Sgt. Carl H. Lindquist, 33, Kandiyohi, Minnesota, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for June 4, 2018.

In late November 1950, Lindquist was a member of Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. The unit, designated the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), engaged with forces of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in a battle on the east side of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea. Lindquist was reported missing in action during the battle, on Nov. 29, 1950.

Other information:    ENTERED ON 10 SEPTEMBER 1941.  SERVED THE DURATION OF WORLD WAR II AND WAS DISCHARGED ON 11 NOVEMBER 1945.  RE-ENLISTED FOR KOREA AND WAS A MEMBER OF COMPANY H, 31st INFANTRY REGIMENT, 7th INFANTRY DIVISION.  BECAME MISSING IN ACTION ON 29 NOVEMBER 1950 AS A PART OF TASK FORCE MACLEAN IN THE CHOSIN RESEVOIR.  
WAS PRESUMED AND DECLARED DEAD ON 31 DECEMBER 1953.  BODY WAS NEVER RECOVERED.


DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Lindquist’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Airmen killed From World War II Accounted For
August 7
, 2018

Army Air Forces Flight Officer Richard W. Lane, 21,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Flight Officer Richard W. Lane, 21, of Beatrice, Nebraska, accounted for on April 23, will be buried Aug. 9 in Gage, Nebraska. In December 1944, Lane served with the 815th Bombardment Squadron, 483rd Bombardment Group (Heavy), 15th Air Force. He was killed on Dec. 27, 1944 when the B-17G aircraft he co-piloted was shot down on a bombardment mission over Austria. As Allied aircraft neared the target at Linz, Austria, they encountered heavy anti-aircraft fire. Lane’s aircraft took a direct hit over Linz and reportedly crashed near St. Florian, Austria. 

Lane and three other crew members were listed as buried in St. Florian Cemetery on Dec. 29, 1944.

In May 1945, the American Graves Registration Command, in an effort to investigate unresolved casualties that occurred in Europe, concluded that one of the Airmen in Lane’s aircraft was the only unresolved Airman killed in close proximity to the recovery locationW of X-239. Based on this information, X-239 was disinterred but dental analysis was unable to make a positive association with the Airman. The remains were then reinterred in the United States Military Cemetery Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, on Aug. 2, 1950.

In June 1945, the AGRC recovered four sets of remains from a single grave near the cathedral in the St. Florian Cemetery. The AGRC was able to identify one set of remains, designating the others as Unknowns X-59, X-60 and X-61. The unidentified remains were transferred to the temporary cemetery in Nurnberg, Germany. 

In August 1945, unknown remains were disinterred from the Nurnberg cemetery for reprocessing and moved to the U.S. military Cemetery at St. Avold, France, where they were redesignated as X-239, X-240, X-241 and X-242 St. Avold. 

In January 1946, the Quartermaster General identified the remains designated X-240 to be Lane, subsequently burying them in the Filley Cemetery in Gage County, Nebraska.

Based on DPAA’s analysis of historical documents, it is likely that the remains designated X-239 and X-240 became exchanged during or immediately after the August 1945 movement to St. Avold. 

On June 8, 2017, a team from the U.S. Army Regional Mortuary-Europe/Africa, working with the American Battle Monuments Commission, exhumed X-239 from the Henri-Chapelle Cemetery. The remains were transferred to DPAA for analysis.

To identify Lane’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
August 7
, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Emil F. Ragucci, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Emil F. Ragucci, 19, of Philadelphia, accounted for on Nov. 13, 2017, will be buried August 14, in his hometown. In November 1943, Ragucci was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Ragucci died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance the Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Ragucci’s remains were not recovered. On Oct. 24, 1949, a military review board declared Ragucci’s remains non-recoverable.

In September 2013, through a partnership with History Flight, Inc., JPAC (a predecessor to DPAA) received the remains of a group that had been located in the known area of Cemetery 33. The remains were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in Honolulu for analysis.

To identify Ragucci’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 7
, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum, 38,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Rufus L. Ketchum, 38, of Superior, Wisconsin, accounted for on April 23, will be buried August 14 in his hometown. In late November 1950, Ketchum was a member of Medical Detachment, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. The U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. McKinney was reported missing in action on Dec. 6, 1950, when he could not be accounted for after the withdrawal to Hagaru-ri.

Ketchum’s name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no returning Americans reported Ketchum as a prisoner of war. Based on the testimony of a surviving member of his unit who witnessed Ketchum’s death, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 6, 1950.

In September 2001, a joint U.S. and Korean People’s Army (KPA) recovery ream conducted a Joint Recovery Operation (JRO) in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County, Chagjin District, South Hamgyong Province, North Korea, based on information provided by two Korean witnesses. During the excavation, the recovery team recovered material evidence and possible osseous remains of at least seven individuals. The remains were subsequently sent to the laboratory for identification.

To identify Ketchum’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, and material and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
August 6
, 2018

Navy Seaman 2nd Class Wilbur C. Barrett, 26


Navy Seaman 2nd Class Wilbur C. Barrett, 26,  El Dorado, Kansas killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Barrett was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Barrett.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Barrett's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Pilot Killed From Vietnam War Accounted For
August 6, 2018

U.S. Air Force Reserve Col. Frederic M. Mellor, 30

U.S. Air Force Reserve Col. Frederic M. Mellor, 30, Cranston RI,  killed during the Vietnam War, was accounted for on July 13.

On Aug. 13, 1965, Mellor, who was assigned to the 20th Tactical
Reconnaissance Squadron, and on temporary duty with the 15th Reconnaissance Task Force, was flying the lead RF-101C aircraft in a flight of two on a mission to conduct photo and visual reconnaissance of a suspected surface to-air missile site in Son La Province, in the then-Democratic Republic of Vietnam. During the flight, hostile ground fire damaged the aircraft, causing it to crash. Mellor survived his ejection and attempted to evade the enemy. Initial radio contact was established, however contact was lost, and, despite a two-day search, neither Mellor nor his aircraft were found. He was subsequently listed as missing in action.

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of Vietnam, as well as the Vietnamese Office for Seeking Missing Persons, for their assistance in returning Mellor's remains to present-day DPAA.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days
prior to scheduled funeral services.

Mellor's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the National
Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, along with the others who are missing from the Vietnam War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

Today there are 1,596 American servicemen and civilians that are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 2
, 2018

 

Army Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Terrell J. Fuller, 20, of Toccoa, Georgia, accounted for on April 13, will be buried Aug. 11 in his hometown. In February 1951, Fuller was a member of Company D, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting Republic of Korea Army attacks against units of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea. After enduring sustained enemy attacks, the American units withdrew to Wonju, South Korea. It was during this withdrawal that Fuller was reported missing, as of Feb. 12, 1951.

In December 1951, Fuller’s name appeared on a list provided by the CPVF and Korean People’s Army (KPA) of allied service members who died while in their custody. Following the war, a fellow soldier from the same company reported that he had been held prisoner with Fuller, but was unaware of his status. When Fuller was not returned after the armistice, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Feb. 18, 1954.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which were later determined to contain the remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who died during the war. On May 20, 1990, North Korea turned over five boxes of remains believed to be unaccounted-for servicemen from the war. 

To identify Fuller’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, dental and anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
August 2
, 2018

Army Sgt. William A. Larkins, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. William A. Larkins, 20, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, accounted for on May 4, 2017, will be buried Aug. 10 in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania. In late November 1950, Larkins was a member of A Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, fighting off persistent Chinese attacks in the Ch’ongch’on River region of North Korea. Through a series of attacks, the Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) pressed 2ID units into local withdrawals to avoid being outflanked. On the night of Nov. 25, 1950, the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) began relentless attacks which continued until the end of the month. On Dec. 1,1950, the 503rd FA BN began their movement down the Main Supply Route under continuous enemy mortar, small arms and machine gun fire, toward the town of Sunchon, where Larkins was reported missing in action.

Following the war, one returning prisoner of war reported that Larkins had been captured and had died at an unknown prisoner of war camp in January 1951.

 Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Jan. 31, 1951.

In April and May 2005, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA,) and KPA Recovery Team conducted the 37th Joint Field Activity in Unsan County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea. A site southeast of the Pukchin-Tarigol Prisoner of war camp cluster was found to have probable human remains and material evidence, and was completely excavated. The remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis on May 27, 2005.

To identify Larkins’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-SYR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, as well as dental and anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
July 31
, 2018

Marine Corps Cpl. Claire E. Goldtrap, 21

Marine Corps Cpl. Claire E. Goldtrap, 21, from Oklahoma, killed during World War II, was accounted for on June 1, 2018.

In November 1943, Goldtrap was assigned to Company A, 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Goldtrap died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943, during the first wave of the assault.

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Goldtrap’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Sailor killed From World War II Accounted For
July 31
, 2018

Army Pfc. Leslie Shankles, 33

Army Pfc. Leslie Shankles, 33, Vernon County, Missouri, killed during World War II, was accounted for on July 12, 2018.

In October 1944, Shankles was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. He was killed Oct. 14, 1944 by enemy fire in the Raffelsbrand sector of the Hürtgen Forest, near Germeter, Germany. 

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Shankles’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in Neuville American Cemetery, Shankles’ grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
July 31
, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert L. Zehetner,


Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Robert L. Zehetner, from Florida, killed during World War II, was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

In November 1943, Zehetner was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.

Zehetner died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Zehetner’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 31
, 2018

Navy Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Fireman 1st Class Chester E. Seaton, 20, of Omaha, Nebraska, accounted for on Nov. 6, 2017, will be buried August 8 in Tacoma, Washington. On Dec. 7, 1941, Seaton was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Seaton. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Seaton.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.
¬
To identify Seaton’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, along with circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Tuskegee Airman Killed During World War II Accounted For
July 27, 2018

Lost Tuskegee Airman’s Body May Have Been Found

Members of the 1942 graduating class at Tuskegee Army Flying School:
Alwayne Dunlap, Lawrence E Dickson, Wilmeth W Sidat Singh and Elmer L Gordon.

U.S. Army Air Forces Capt. Lawrence E. Dickson,


U.S. Army Air Forces Capt. Lawrence E. Dickson, Bronx, N.Y., killed during World War II, was accounted for on July 27. 

In December 1944, Dickson was a pilot with the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, in the European Theater. On Dec.23, 1944, Dickson departed Ramitelli Air Base, Italy on an aerial reconnaissance mission toward Praha, Czechoslovakia. On his return, Dickson’s P-51D aircraft suffered engine failure and was seen to crash along the borders of Italy and Austria, reportedly between Malborghetto and Tarviso, Italy. According to witnesses, Dickson’s plane had rolled over with the canopy jettisoned. He was not observed ejecting from the plane. Dickson’s remains were not recovered and he was subsequently declared missing in action.

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of Austria, the University of New Orleans, the University of Innsbruck, and Mr. Roland Domanig, for their partnerships in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Dickson’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Impruneta, Italy, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for. 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
July 27
, 2018

Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Merton R. Riser,


Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Merton R. Riser, Sanborn, Iowa killed during World War II, was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

In November 1943, Riser was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Riser died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

DPAA is grateful to the Department for Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Riser’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 27
, 2018

Navy Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class William L. Kvidera, 22

Navy Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class William L. Kvidera, 22, WaterlooIA , killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on July 3, 2018.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kvidera was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Kvidera.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Kvidera's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
July 26
, 2018

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ottaway B. Cornwell,

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Ottaway B. Cornwell, killed during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On January 27, 1944, Cornwell was a member of the 4th Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group, Twelfth (XII) Air Force, piloting a Supermarine Spitfire aircraft, which was shot down over Pierrefeu-du-Var, France. Cornwell was engaged in battle with a German Messerschmitt 109 (Me-109). Another pilot also engaged in battle witnessed two unidentified aircraft crash into the side of a mountain near Pierrefeu-du-Var. Cornwell could not be reached through radio contact. Because southern France was occupied by enemy forces, an immediate search could not be conducted. After Allied forces liberated the area, they were unable to locate Cornwell’s remains.

DPAA is grateful to Mr. Steve Leleu and the French government for their assistance in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Cornwell’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Florence American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Impruneta, Italy, along with the others missing from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
July 26
, 2018

Army Pvt. John B. Cummings,

Army Pvt. John B. Cummings, killed during World War II, was accounted for on July 12.

In December 1944, Cummings was a member of Company A, 276th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division, along the France and Germany border to reinforce the Alsace area. On Dec. 31, 1944, German troops crossed the Rhine River into France. As darkness fell, two member of Cummings’ company passed him as he sat in a foxhole near the riverbank. Sometime later, U.S. troops heard German machine gun fire and maneuvered their way back to Cummings’ foxhole. The troops were unable to find Cummings, but they did find a helmet with a bullet hole. Despite extensive recovery efforts, Cummings’ remains were unable to be located.

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Cummings’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Epinal American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Dinoze, France, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in Normandy American Cemetery, Cummings’ grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 26
, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker, 20

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Seaman 1st Class Eugene W. Wicker, 20, of Coweta, Oklahoma, accounted for on January 10, will be buried August 4 in Fort Gibson, Oklahoma. On Dec. 7, 1941, Wicker was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wicker. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Wicker.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Wicker’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 26
, 2018

Marine Corps Pfc. Robert K. Holmes, 19

Marine Corps Pfc. Robert K. Holmes, 19, Salt Lake County, Utah, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on May 9, 2018.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Holmes was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Holmes.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Holmes’ name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 23
, 2018

Navy Aviation Radioman 3rd Class Walter E. Mintus,

 

Navy Aviation Radioman 3rd Class Walter E. Mintus, Portage, Pa. killed during World War II, was accounted for on June 25, 2018.

On July 27, 1944, Mintus was a radioman aboard a torpedo bomber from U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron Fifty One (VT-51). Mintus’ aircraft was the lead of four Avengers on a mission targeting the Japanese base at Malakal Harbor. The aircraft was last observed three to five miles ahead of the other aircraft, at the beginning of the attack. Witnesses observed an object, believed to be an aircraft, on fire in Malakal Harbor. All three servicemen on board, including Mintus, were reported missing in action and subsequently presumed dead on Feb. 4, 1946.

DPAA is grateful to the government of Palau and Project Recover for their partnership in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Mintus’ name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 23
, 2018

Navy Fireman 1st Class Millard C. Pace, 24

Navy Fireman 1st Class Millard C. Pace, 24, Arkansas,  killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Pace was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Pace.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Pace’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
July 20
, 2018

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Vincent L. Politte, 19, of Leavenworth, Kansas, accounted for on April 11, will be buried July 30 in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In the summer of 1943, Politte served as a gunner with the 345th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 9th Air Force. He was killed while participating in a raid on the Ploesti Oil Refinery complex north of Bucharest, Romania, during Operation Tidal Wave. The goal of the operation was to destroy the refineries in the area in order to hamper the German war effort. During the raid, Politte’s B-24 Liberator aircraft was hit by machine gun fire and crashed. Following the war, his remains could not be identified. 

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. servicemen in Europe as part of the global effort to identify and return fallen servicemen. Remains that could not be identified were designated as unknowns and interred in U.S. overseas cemeteries. Beginning in 2010, DPAA and its predecessors digitized and began to analyze more than 8,000 files for Unknowns from WWII.

One set of unidentified remains, designated Unknown X-5056 Neuville, were historically linked to an unaccounted-for American lost during the aerial bombing raids against oil refineries at Ploesti, Romania.

In April 2016, following analysis by DPAA anthropologists of biological DNA for X-5056 Neuville that suggested the remains could most likely be identified, the Unknown was disinterred and transported to the DPAA laboratory. 

To identify Politte’s remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), analysis, dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 19, 2018

Army Cpl. Albert E. Mills,

Army Cpl. Albert E. Mills, from Texas, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 13.

In July 1950, Mills was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, blocking the Korean People’s Army from advancing along a corridor linking the cities of Taejon and Taegu. South Korea. On July 23, 1950, enemy forces attacked American defenses at Yongdong. Mills was reported missing in action on July 25, 1950, as a result of the fighting, when he could not be accounted for by his unit. 

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Mills' name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 17, 2018

Army Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera, 20

Army Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera, 20, NEW YORK, NEW YORK  killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12.

In July 1950, Ramos-Rivera was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North Korean forces near Taegon, South Korea. As U.S. forces regrouped after their evacuation, Ramos-Rivera could not be accounted-for and was declared missing in action on July 20, 1950.

DPAA is grateful to Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Ramos-Rivera's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 17, 2018

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn,

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, 34, Idaho Falls, Idaho killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12.

In late 1950, Chinn was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent Chinese attacks in North Korea. Chinn was reportedly captured by enemy forces on Dec. 1, 1950, and was held at several temporary prisoner of war camps before being marched northwest to POW Camp 5 Complex, North Korea. 

Leonard Chinn earned the Silver Star while fighting in World War II. The Silver Star is the “third-highest military combat decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Armed Forces,” 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and looks forward to a fulfillment of the commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Chinn's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 16, 2018

Army Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday,

Army Pvt. Delbert J. Holliday, La Crosse, Wi. killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12, 2018.

In November 1950, Holliday was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 7th Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions against the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of North Pyongan Province, North Korea. Holliday was killed in action on Nov. 30, 1950 and was reportedly buried in the United Nations Military Cemetery (UNMC) Pyongyang. As the United Nations’ situation with North Korea worsened, circumstances forced UNMC Pyongyang on Dec. 3, 1950, and buried remains could not be recovered.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Holliday's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 16, 2018

Army Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera, 20

Army Cpl. Francisco Ramos-Rivera, 20, NEW YORK, NEW YORK killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12.

On July 20, 1950, the 3rd Battalion of the U.S. 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, was holding a defensive line in South Korea overlooking the Taejon Airport, northeast of the city. When enemy tanks broke through the line near the airport, U.S. troops were ordered to fall back through Taejon. The 3rd Battalion was ordered to lead the convoy out of Taejon, but ran into a series of collapsed structures and roadblocks that broke up the column. U.S. forces were unable to break through these roadblocks, and to avoid capture soldiers moved off-road and began filtering through the countryside in small groups.

Corporal Francisco Ramos-Rivera entered the U.S. Army from New York and served in Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He went missing in action on July 20 during the withdrawal from Taejon, though the exact details surrounding his loss are unknown. His remains were not recovered or identified among those returned to U.S. custody following the war. Today, Corporal Ramos-Rivera is memorialized on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

DPAA is grateful to Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.
Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.
Ramos-Rivera's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 16, 2018

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, 34

Army Master Sgt. Leonard K. Chinn, 34, Idaho Falls, Idaho killed during the Korean War, was accounted for on July 12.

In late 1950, Chinn was a member of Company D, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was fighting off persistent Chinese attacks in North Korea. Chinn was reportedly captured by enemy forces on Dec. 1, 1950, and was held at several temporary prisoner of war camps before being marched northwest to POW Camp 5 Complex, North Korea. 

DPAA is grateful to the government and people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and looks forward to a fulfillment of the commitment made by President Trump and Chairman Kim on the return and recovery of U.S. service members in North Korea.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Chinn's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 16
, 2018

Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class George H. Gibson, 20, of Winchester, Kansas, accounted for on February 12, will be buried July 21 in Inglewood, California. On Dec. 7, 1941, Gibson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Gibson. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Gibson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.
¬
To identify Gibson’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 16, 2018

Army Pfc. Walter W. Green, 18,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted for from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. Walter W. Green, 18, of Zanesville, Ohio, accounted for on Aug. 8, 2017, will be buried July 20 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. In November 1950, Green was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, participating in combat actions against the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of Unsan, North Korea. Green was reported missing in action as of Nov. 2, 1950 when he could not be accounted for by his unit.

Following the war, during an operation known as “Operation Big Switch,” when prisoners of war were returned, returning Americans from Pyoktong Camp 5 reported that Green had been captured and died while at POW Camp 5. Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on June 30, 1951.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Green’s remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

In September 1954, a set of remains received from North Korea and reportedly recovered from the Pyoktong Cemetery were returned and designated Evacuation (Evac) N-14413 by the Central Identification Laboratory (CIU-Kokura). However, the remains could not be identified and were interred as Unknown X-14413 at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In November 1998, the Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii recommended the disinterment of 15 unknowns, including X-14413. The remains were disinterred on January 31, 2001 and sent to the laboratory for analysis.

To identify Green’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, laboratory analysis, including dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
July 16
, 2018

Army Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz, 28

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Staff Sgt. David Rosenkrantz, 28, of Los Angeles, accounted for on March 7, will be buried in June 20 in Riverside, California. In September 1944, Rosenkrantz was a member of Company H, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, participating in Operation Market Garden, a ploy by Allied planners to break German defensive lines on the western front by capturing a highway route through the Netherlands. On Sept. 28, 1944, Rosenkrantz’ platoon occupied Heuvelhof, a farm, located south of the town of Groesbeek. German tanks and infantry launched a major attack that morning. The isolated paratroopers hid among sparse trees and buildings. As Rosenkrantz rose from his position, enemy gunfire erupted and Rosenkrantz was killed. Due to enemy fire and the proximity to enemy troops, Rosenkrantz’ remains could not be recovered. 

Between 1945 and 1952, Canadian, Dutch and American Graves Registration teams were active in the area where Rosenkrantz died. The Dutch team recovered identification tags for Rosenkrantz, along with fragmentary remains. An American team, acting on the information provided by the Dutch, followed up and found additional fragmentary remains, but the combined remains discovered were too sparse to be identified. Unbeknownst to those teams, a Canadian team working in the area prior to their arrival had already collected the remains of service members killed in this area. As a result of all of these activities, several sets of unidentifiable remains recovered from the battlefields around Groesbeek were buried as unknowns in American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) cemeteries in Europe.

After thorough research and historical analysis by DPAA. Aided by Dutch researcher Mr. Ben Overhand and 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment historian Mr. Frank Van Lunteren, one set of interred remains, X-1234 Margraten, was circumstantially associated to the location of where Rosenkrantz was killed.

The remains, which were initially recovered by the 2nd Canadian Graves Registration Unit, were buried at the Canadian Military Cemetery on June 22, 1945, and were listed as an American Soldier. 

On June 14, 2017, DPAA disinterred X-1234 from the Netherlands American Cemetery. 

To identify Rosenkrantz’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records; and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 6
, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class James C. Solomon, 23,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Seaman 1st Class James C. Solomon, 23, of Forestburg, Texas, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017, will be buried July 14, in his hometown. On Dec. 7, 1941, Solomon was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Solomon. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Solomon.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Solomon’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 6
, 2018

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Fireman 2nd Class Lowell E. Valley, 19, of Ontonagon, Michigan, accounted for on January 11, will be buried July 14 in his hometown. On Dec. 7, 1941, Valley was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Valley. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Valley.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Valley’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA, as well as circumstantial evidence and dental and anthropological analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
July 5
, 2018

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William W. Shank, 24

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces 1st Lt. William W. Shank, 24, of Harrisonburg, Virginia, accounted for on March 5, will be buried July 14 in his hometown. On Nov. 13, 1943, Shank was a pilot with the 338th Fighter Squadron, 55th Fighter Group, 66th Fighter Wing, 8th Fighter Command, 8th Air Force, flying his P-38 on a mission to Bremen, Germany. Shank was killed after engaging in fierce enemy action.

In June 1948, the American Graves Registration Command recovered partial remains from a P-38 crash site at Osteressen, Germany, however they were declared unidentifiable, designated as X-7466 and buried as an Unknown at Ardennes American Cemetery, Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium.

On May 29, 2008, historians from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC, a predecessor to DPAA) met with a local German researcher, Mr. Werner Oeltjebruns, who said he could identify Shank’s crash site. The team visited the crash site in Osteressen, where material evidence of a crash site remained.

In 2016, a DPAA recovery team conducted an excavation of the Osteressen site, where they recovered possible osseous material. Simultaneously, after thorough historical research and analysis, DPAA disinterred X-7466 from Neuville.

To identify Shank’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well anthropological analysis and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
July 3
, 2018

Army Pfc. Willard Jenkins, 26

Army Pfc. Willard Jenkins, 26, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, killed during World War II, was accounted for on July 3, 2018.

In September 1944, Jenkins was a member of Company C, 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion (307th AEB), 82nd Airborne Division near Nijmegen, Netherlands. On Sept. 20, 1944, while participating in Operation Market Garden, the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) was ordered to cross the Waal River to make an amphibious attack on the bridges. Using borrowed British assault boats, members of the PIR crowded into boats with members of Jenkins’ battalion. According to historical reports, Jenkins operated the rudder of one of the boats, and was wounded in the chest by fire, before falling overboard. Because the area downstream of the river was controlled by enemy forces, a search could not be conducted. Jenkins was declared missing in action on Sept. 20, 1944.

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission and the government of the Netherlands for their partnership in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Jenkins’ name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Margraten, Netherlands, along with the other MIAs from WWII. Although interred as an "unknown", his grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle Monuments Commission. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 3, 2018

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, 30

Army Pfc. Joe S. Elmore, Clinton, 30, Hickman County, Kentucky, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for July 3, 2018.

In late November, 1950, Elmore was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. As the Chinese attacks continued, American forces withdrew south. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured, killed or missing in enemy territory. Because Elmore could not be accounted for by his unit, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

DPAA is grateful to the British government and military authorities, as well as the Korean government for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Elmore’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
July 3
, 2018

Army Air Forces Sgt. Charles H. Daman, 21

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Sgt. Charles H. Daman, 21, of De Smet, Idaho, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be buried July 11 in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. In the spring of 1945, as the war in Europe drew to a close, Allied forces launched a series of aerial attacks to cripple what remained of the German air force. Daman, who was a member of the 714th Bombardment Squadron, 448th Bombardment Group, 2nd Bombardment Division, was aboard an aircraft on an attack mission on April 4, 1945, as one of more than 400 bombers to attack airbases at Parchim, Perleberg and Wesendorf, Germany. The aircraft, which held 10 airmen, was attacked by enemy fighter planes in the vicinity of Hamburg. 

Following the attack, the aircraft exploded and crashed, leaving only one survivor, who was subsequently captured after he parachuted into the town of Ludwigslust. Personal effects of eight of the nine missing crewmembers were found and identified by the surviving airman. 

On August 15, 1997, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA) investigative team travelled to Ludwigslust to locate a possible crash site. A local helped the team analyze a 1948 site sketch and align it with present-day landmarks. With this information, the team found aircraft wreckage. 

In 2014 and 2015, multiple recovery teams excavated the site, finding osseous material. The remains were sent to DPAA for analysis. 

To identify Daman’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
July 3
, 2018

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H. Canty, 22

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. John H. Canty, 22, of Winsted, Connecticut, accounted for on Dec. 12, 2017, will be buried July 10 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. On June 22, 1944, Canty was a member of the 555th Bombardment Squadron, 386th Bombardment Group, IX Bomber Command, aboard a B-26 Maurader on a nighttime bombing mission from Easton Lodge-Essex, England, against targets near Caen, France. His B-26 was shot down between the villages of Baron-sur-Odon and Gavrus, France. All eight crewmembers were killed in the incident. Because the location of the crash was in German-held territory, U.S. forces were unable to make a detailed search for the crew at the time of their loss. 

Following the liberation of France, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC), U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps, searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. service members who were killed in battle. Residents of Gavrus recalled that a two-engine airplane crashed just outside the village on June 22, 1944. An American was recovered and buried in a nearby British cemetery. In 1945, the remains were exhumed and he was identified as an airman aboard the same aircraft as Canty. However, no other remains were identified and Canty was declared non-recoverable.

In 1986, a French citizen located remains and personal effects recovered from a crash site near Gavrus. The remains were handed to the Normandy American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, France, and were later identified as four individuals from the same aircraft as Canty. 

In October 2014, Mr. Michael Jurd, a British researcher contacted U.S. authorities that he found remains, as well as personal effects that corresponded to Canty, near Gavrus. 

In 2016, a DPAA investigation team surveyed the reported crash site and recommended it for excavation.

Between April and May 2017, a DPAA recovery team excavated the crash site between Baron-sur-Odon and Gavrus, locating possible remains and personal effects. 

To identify Canty’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
July 2, 2018

Army Sgt. 1st Class Elmore B. Goodwin, 25,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Elmore B. Goodwin, 25, of Norfolk, Virginia, accounted for Aug. 18, 2017, will be buried July 9 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. In late November 1950, Goodwin was a member of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of Anju, North Korea. Goodwin was reported missing in action on Nov. 27, 1950. When no information regarding Goodwin was reported by returning American POWs, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

On August 30, 1998, during a Joint Recovery Operation, a Joint U.S./ North Korean recovery team interviewed a witness who claimed to have found human remains in a cornfield in Kujang District. On Sept. 6, 1998, the remains were repatriated to the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii.

To identify Goodwin’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed From World War II Accounted For
July 2
, 2018

Army Pvt. Donald E. Brown,


Army Pvt. Donald E. Brown, killed during World War II, killed during World War II, was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

In July 1944, Brown was a member of Company A, 745th Tank Battalion, fighting in support of the 1st Infantry Division in the European Theater, in World War II. Brown was killed in action on July 28, 1944, when his M-4 Sherman tank was destroyed by enemy fire near Cambernon, France. 

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their assistance in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Brown’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Brittany American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Saint James, France, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown in Normandy American Cemetery, Brown’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Missing From World War II Accounted For
July 2
, 2018

Army Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pvt. Kenneth D. Farris, 19, of Dodson, Texas, accounted for on April 23, will be buried July 9 in Dallas. In November 1944, Farris served with Company B, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. Farris’ unit arrived in the Hürtgen Forest in Germany on Nov. 9, 1944 and immediately began preparing to advance eastward to the town of Grosshau. Despite continued progress, the regiment’s Soldiers sustained heavy losses due to enemy artillery fire. On Nov. 28, 1944, Farris was wounded by artillery and left the front line for the battalion aid station. His regiment remained in combat for several more days, reaching the outskirts of Gey, Germany, before being pulled off the front line. When officers took an accounting of the surviving Company B soldiers, Farris could not be found. The last any of the survivors knew was that he had tried to find an aid station. He was listed missing in action when he could not be located. 

Due to a lack of new information, Farris was declared deceased as of Nov. 29, 1945.

Between 1946 and 1950, dozens of unidentified remains were recovered from the Hürtgen Forest by various graves registration units. In May 1946, members of the 6890th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company of the American Graves Registration Command, recovered an unburied set of remains in a minefield near Gey, Germany. The remains were designated as X-2762 Neuville and interred at United States Military Cemetery Neuville-en-Condroz, Belgium- present day Ardennes American Cemetery. X-2762 was disinterred on Nov. 17, 1948 for reprocessing. When an identification could not be made, they were interred at Epinal American Cemetery in France. Because no remains had been associated with Farris, he was declared non-recoverable on Dec. 8, 1950. 

Following thorough scientific and historical analysis by DPAA historians, X-2762 Neuville was disinterred from the Epinal American Cemetery on July 27, 2017 and sent to DPAA for analysis. 

To identify Farris’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, as well as anthropological, and dental analysis, and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 29
, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Joseph M. Johnson, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Seaman 1st Class Joseph M. Johnson, 22, of Rushford, Minnesota, accounted for on Aug. 28, 2017, will be buried July 7 in his hometown. On Dec. 7, 1941, Johnson was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Johnson. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Johnson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.
¬
To identify Johnson’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis, which matched his records.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 29
, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted for from World War II are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Seaman 1st Class Leon Arickx, 22, of Mitchell, Iowa, accounted for on January 30, will be buried July 7 in Osage, Iowa. On Dec. 7, 1941, Arickx was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Arickx. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Arickx.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Arickx’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, anthropological analysis, along with circumstantial evidence. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 29, 2018

Army Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan, 18,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Thomas W. Reagan, 18, of Lebanon, Indiana, and accounted for on March 30, will be buried July 6 in Pensacola, Florida. In August 1950, Reagan was assigned to Company A, 14th Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, participating in the defense of the 24th ID’s main supply route and the town of Yongsan in an area known as the Naktong Bulge, in South Korea. Reagan’s company, an engineer unit, was overwhelmed and outmaneuvered by the Korean People’s Army, and utilized as an infantry unit in an attempt to hold open the supply route. On Aug. 12, 1950, the company was able to withdraw to a safe area to account for their Soldiers. Reagan could not be accounted for and was declared missing in action.

An Unknown, labeled X-165 Tanggok, buried in the division’s cemetery at Miryang, South Korea, was recovered on Sept. 12, 1950. Attempts to associate the remains with unresolved U.S. casualties were unsuccessful and they were declared unidentifiable. The remains were buried in the National Memorial of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu, as a Korean War Unknown.

After thorough scientific and historical analysis, it was deemed that X-165 could likely be identified. On May 19, 2014, a request to exhume X-165 was made and approved. The remains were disinterred and sent to the laboratory for identification. 

To identify Reagan’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 29, 2018

 

Army Sgt. John W. Hall, 23,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, captured during m the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. John W. Hall, 23, of Jennings, Louisiana, accounted for on June 6, 2017, will be buried July 6 in Houston. In late November 1950, Hall was a member of Headquarters Battery, 503rd Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. On Nov. 29, 1950, Hall’s unit received orders to move from Kunu-ri to Sunchon, North Korea. The division received reports that the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) had set up fireblocks on several roads, including their planned withdrawal route. The division organized a movement into convoys, with Hall in the eighth convoy. Hall’s battalion began their withdrawal through an area known as “The Gauntlet.” Hall was reported missing in action on Dec. 1, 1950, in the vicinity of Somindong, North Korea.

Following the war, one returning American prisoner of war reported that Hall had been captured and died on January 26, 1951 at Hofong Camp, or “Death Valley,” part of the Pukchin-Tarigol Camp Cluster.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Hall’s remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

In April and May 2005, a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (predecessor to DPAA) and Korean People’s Army (KPA) recovery team conducted the 37th Joint Field Activity in Unsan County, North Pyongan Province, North Korea. Remains were found in what was believed to have been a secondary burial site, and were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in Honolulu for analysis.

To identify Hall’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 29
, 2018

Navy Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery,

Navy Fireman 1st Class Raymond R. Camery, killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on March 28, 2018.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Camery was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Camery.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Camery’s name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 28, 2018

Marine Corps Pfc. Roger Gonzales,20

Marine Corps Pfc. Roger Gonzales, 20, San Pedro, California, killed during the Korean War, was accounted for April 4, 2018.

In late November, 1950, Gonzales was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. The U.S. X Corps began earnest operations in the northeast of the Korean Peninsula against enemy units of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPFV), which were thought to be soldiers of the Korean People’s Army (KPA). The X Corps began its offensive, spearheaded by the 1st Marine Division and the U.S. Army’s 31st Regimental Combat Team, in the area of the Chosin Reservoir. On Nov. 27, 1950, Gonzales’ unit moved northwest from Hagru-ri to Fox Hill at the Toktong Pass. In the early hours of November 28, the CPVF attacked and Gonzales’ company sustained heavy casualties. Gonzales was reported to have been killed in action on Nov. 29, 1950, and was buried at the base of Fox Hill.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this recovery.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Gonzales’ name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from the Korean War. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 25
, 2018

Navy Fireman 1st Class Walter F. Schleiter,


Navy Fireman 1st Class Walter F. Schleiter, from Ohio was killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on May 18, 2018.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Schleiter was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Schleiter.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Schleiter's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 25
, 2018

Navy Seaman 1st Class Daniel L. Guisinger, Jr.


Navy Seaman 1st Class Daniel L. Guisinger, Jr., killed during the attack on the USS Oklahoma in World War II, was accounted for on May 22, 2018.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Guisinger was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Guisinger.

In 2015, DPAA disinterred remains from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu.

DPAA is grateful to the Department of Veterans Affairs for their partnership in this mission.

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Guisinger's name is recorded on the Courts of the Missing at the Punchbowl, along with the others who are missing from World War II. A rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
June 22
, 2018

Army Sgt. James K. Park,


Army Sgt. James K. Park, Jefferson County, Texas killed during World War II, was accounted for on June 20, 2018.

In November 1944, Park was a member of Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, engaged in fierce fighting within the Hürtgen Forest in Germany. Park was reported missing in action on Nov. 23, 1944, when he was believed to have been wounded by shrapnel from a shell that struck a tree above him. Due to continuous enemy fire, Soldiers from Park’s company were prevented from searching for him. Additionally, no graves registration teams reported finding his remains. Due to no information regarding his whereabouts, his status was amended to deceased as of Nov. 24, 1945.

DPAA is grateful to American Battle Monuments Commission for their partnership with this disinterment. 

Interment services are pending; more details will be released 7-10 days prior to scheduled funeral services.

Park’s name is recorded on the Tablets of the Missing at the Netherlands American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission in Margraten, along with the others missing from WWII. Although interred as an Unknown, Park’s grave was meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the ABMC.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
June 21
, 2018

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews, 25,

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Percy C. Mathews, 25, of Andalusia, Alabama, accounted for on March 26, will be buried June 28 in Pensacola, Florida. On May 29, 1943, Mathews was a member of the 422nd Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group, 8th U.S. Air Force, participating in a strike against the German submarine base at Saint-Nazaire, France. The B-17 Mathews was aboard was hit by enemy fire as it left the target area. Mathews did not make it out of the bomber before it crashed. Survivors believed the aircraft crashed approximately 150 kilometers from Saint-Nazaire, near the French village of Quintin. German reports indicated one casualty was recovered from the wreckage of the plane, though no burial information was provided.

Following the end of the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) searched for and disinterred the remains of U.S. servicemen in Europe as part of the global effort to identify and return fallen servicemen. Remains that could not be identified were designated as unknowns and interred in U.S. overseas cemeteries. Beginning in 2010, DPAA and its predecessors digitized and began to analyze more than 8,000 files for Unknowns from WWII.

One set of unidentified remains, designated X-205 St. James, were disinterred from a cemetery in St. Brieuc, France, prior to Sept. 16, 1944. The remains could not be identified and were interred in the American cemetery at St. James, present day Brittany American Cemetery.

In May 2015, a French researcher, Daniel Dahiot, provided DPAA with a page from the St. Brieuc West Cemetery burial register, showing the names of Americans who were interred there during World War II, including Mathews. On April 4, 2017, following thorough historical research and analysis, by DPAA analysts, of unit records and AGRS recovery reports, X-205 was disinterred.

To identify Mathews’ remains, DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
June 21
, 2018

                                                 

Tech Sgt. John F. Brady, 26, Tech Sgt. Allen A. Chandler, Jr., 23, 1st Lt. John H. Liekhus, 29, Staff Sgt. Robert O. Shoemaker, 23, Staff Sgt. Bobby J. Younger, 19.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of five U.S. servicemen, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

They are: Tech Sgt. John F. Brady, 26, of Taunton, Massachusetts; Tech Sgt. Allen A. Chandler, Jr., 23, of Fletcher, Oklahoma; 1st Lt. John H. Liekhus, 29, of Anaheim, California; Staff Sgt. Robert O. Shoemaker, 23, of Takoma Park, Maryland; and Staff Sgt. Bobby J. Younger, 19, of McKinney, Texas, all U.S. Army Air Forces, accounted for on Aug. 10, 2017. These men will be buried as a group June 27 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

On Nov. 2, 1944, the Airmen were members of the 323rd Bombardment Squadron, 91st Bombardment Group (Heavy), Eighth Air Force. Their nine-man aircrew was on a mission to Merseburg, Germany, when their plane was hit by flak during the bomb run. As the B-17 fell out of formation, German fighters attacked. Witnesses reported seeing the aircraft burst into flames and descend rapidly. It crashed two kilometers southwest of the town of Barby. Three crewmembers survived and were taken as prisoners of war. One airman who was killed was identified in May 1945. Brady, Chandler, Liekhus, Shoemaker and Younger were all declared missing in action. In January 1951, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) concluded that the five unaccounted-for crew members perished in the crash and the location of their remains was unknown.

Department of Defense historians and analysts, aided by German researchers and local government officials, located a potential crash site associated with their loss. Recovery operations were conducted from June to September 2015. Recovery teams found osseous remains, material evidence and aircraft wreckage. 

DPAA returned to the crash site in April and May 2016, locating additional osseous remains, material evidence and aircraft wreckage, consolidating them with the evidence from the previous operations.

Three of the crew, Brady, Shoemaker and Younger, were able to be individually identified through mitochondrial DNA analysis, forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence. The remains that could not be individually identified represented the entire crew. 

DPAA is grateful to the German government for their assistance in this recovery.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war. Currently there are 72,906 service members (approximately 26,000 are assessed as possibly-recoverable) still unaccounted for from World War II. Brady’s, Chandler’s, Liekhus’, Shoemaker’s and Younger’s names are recorded on the Walls of the Missing on the Tablets of the Missing at Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, an American Battle Monuments Commission site in Hombourg, Belgium, along with the other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to each name to indicate they have been accounted for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 19
, 2018

Navy Pharmacist’s Mate 1st Class John H. Schoonover, 39

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman from World War II have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Pharmacist’s Mate 1st Class John H. Schoonover, 39, of Port Edwards, Wisconsin, accounted for on Aug. 14, 2017, will be buried June 26 in Pensacola, Florida. On Dec. 7, 1941, Schoonover was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Schoonover. 

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Schoonover.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Schoonover’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons and anthropological analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 15, 2018

Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak, 21,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Staff Sgt. Leo J. Husak, 21, of West, Texas, accounted for on February 12, will be buried June 23 in his hometown. In January 1945, Husak was a member of Company A, 1st Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division, serving in the European theater. Husak was killed during a combat patrol on Jan. 30, 1945 in Germany’s Hürtgen Forest. The offensive in the forest was one of the longest battles the United States fought during World War II, lasting for nearly five months. 

Due to the ongoing fighting, Husak’s remains were not recovered by members of his unit during the battle. After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) collected hundreds of unknown sets of remains from battlefields in Germany, and labeled each set with an X-number. One set of remains, designated X-1043 Margraten, had been recovered from an area in the Hürtgen Forest where Husak was believed to have been killed. The AGRC was unable to identify the remains and buried them at Margraten in June 1945 as an unknown. 

In March 1947, personnel from the AGRC reprocessed the remains but were unable to associate the remains with any American service members. They were again reinterred in Margraten in July 1949.

In October 2016, DPAA researchers made a historical association between X-1043 Margraten and Husak, based on the recovery site of the remains and where he was killed. On June 13, 2017, the remains were disinterred and repatriated to the DPAA laboratory at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska.

To identify Husak’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Airman killed From World War II Accounted For
June 15
, 2018

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Roy F. Davis, 26

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Roy F. Davis, 26, of Peterborough, New Hampshire, accounted for on June 7, 2017, will be buried June 23 in Ashby, Massachusetts. On March 12, 1944, Davis was a member of the 13th Bombardment Squadron, 3rd Bombardment Group, as one of two crewmembers aboard an A-20G Havoc bomber that failed to return to base in northeastern New Guinea after attacking enemy targets on the island. 

Attempts to locate the aircraft and crew, both during and after the war, were unsuccessful. The War Department declared Davis, as well the other crewmember, 2nd Lt. Vernal J. Bird, deceased on June 30, 1949; their remains were listed as non-recoverable.

In September 2001, a team from the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory (a predecessor to DPAA) located a crash site in a remote area of Papua New Guinea. A native Papuan turned over pieces of wreckage he claimed to have recovered from the crash site. The team also recovered possible remains. On July 15, 2013, the remains were identified as Bird’s.

In February and March 2016, a DPAA Recovery Team excavated the crash site, and recovered additional remains and material evidence. The remains were subsequently sent to the DPAA laboratory.

To identify Davis’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 15, 2018

Army Pfc. David Baker, 18

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. David Baker, 18, of Gary, Indiana, accounted for on January 31, will be buried June 23 in Hobart, Indiana. In late November 1950, Baker was a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, positioned in the vicinity of Yongbyong, North Korea. Baker’s battalion moved north and lost contact with two other regiments. On Nov. 25, 1950, 3rd BN met with enemy resistance and was attacked by Chinese People’s Volunteer Force. The battalion suffered heavy casualties and Baker was declared missing in action as of Nov. 28, 1950, when he could not be accounted for by his unit. Later reports indicate that baker was likely captured by the enemy during battle.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Baker’s remains were not included, and he was declared non-recoverable. 

In December 1993, North Korea turned over 34 boxes of remains, which were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in Honolulu. One box was reportedly exhumed from Tongju-ri, a village near Prisoner of War Camp 5. While no returning prisoners of war reported Baker as a prisoner, where the remains were recovered indicated he had been captured.

To identify Baker’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Marine killed From World War II Accounted For
June 15
, 2018

Marine Pfc. John W. Mac Donald, 19,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Pfc. John W. Mac Donald, 19, of Somerville, Massachusetts, accounted for on Aug. 15, 2016, will be buried June 22 in Bourne, Massachusetts. In November 1943, Mac Donald was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Mac Donald died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Mac Donald’s remains were not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review board declared Mac Donald remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Mac Donald’s remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory analysis, including anthropological analysis and dental and chest radiograph comparison analysis, which matched Mac Donald’s records; as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 14, 2018

Army Pfc. Felipe A. Champion, 19

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. Felipe A. Champion, 19, of Brownsville, Texas, accounted for on Aug. 8, 2017, will be buried June 21 in his hometown. On Feb. 12, 1951, Champion was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, when he was reported missing in action following a battle with the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in an area known as the Central Corridor, South Korea. After CPVF units withdrew north beyond Hongch’on in early March, American units began moving forward and found war dead, however Champion’s remains could not be identified.

A list provided by the CPVF and Korean People’s Army (KPA) listed Champion as a prisoner of war, and a returning American prisoner of war reported that Champion died while in custody at the Suan Bean Camp prisoner of war camp in 1951. Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased on May 3. 1951.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Champion’s remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. On May 28, 1992, North Korea returned 15 boxes of remains reportedly to have been recovered from where Champion was believed to have died.

To identify Champion’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, and circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

USS Oklahoma Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 14
, 2018

Navy Storekeeper 3rd Class Wallace E. Eakes, 22,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Storekeeper 3rd Class Wallace E. Eakes, 22, of Caney, Kansas, accounted for on Sept. 26, 2017, will be buried June 21, in Denver, Colorado. On Dec. 7, 1941, Eakes was assigned to the battleship USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Eakes.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Eakes.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the Punchbowl for analysis.

To identify Eakes’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) DNA analysis, dental anthropological analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier killed From World War II Accounted For
June 13
, 2018

Army Pfc. John H. Walker, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Pfc. John H. Walker, 20, of Morning Sun, Iowa, accounted for on April 11, will be buried June 20 in his hometown. On Nov. 24, 1944, Walker was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in action after his unit engaged in fierce fighting on Hill 207 near Schönthal, Germany in the Hürtgen Forest. With no evidence that Walker had been captured or survived combat, his status was changed to deceased on Nov. 25, 1945.

After the war, the American Graves Registration Command (AGRC) collected thousands of unknown sets of remains from battlefields in Germany, and labeled each set with an X-number. 

In November 1948, German resident Mr. Bernhard Kueppers found remains in the woods at the northern edge of the Hürtgen Forest near Langerwehe, Germany, and notified AGRC personnel, who recovered them the following month. The remains were processed at the Central Identification Point in Neuville Belgium, and designated X-7980 Neuville. In September 1949, the remains were declared unidentifiable and were interred at the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neuville, France.

In April 1949, with no association between Walker and X-7980 Neuville, an AGRC investigator traveled to Schönthal to investigate the loss of Walker, however no remains could be located. On Dec. 15, 1950, having received no further evidence that could lead to the recovery of Walker, he was declared non-recoverable. 

In 2016, a historian from DPAA conducted a study of unresolved American losses in the northern part of the Hürtgen Forest. Careful analysis of AGRC records and unit combat reports indicated a strong association between X-7980 and Walker. 

Based off of that research, and a thorough scientific review of the biological and dental records, the DPAA and the American Battle Monuments Commission exhumed X-7980 in June 2017 and transferred the remains to DPAA.

To identify Walker’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome (Y-STR) DNA analysis, as well as dental and anthropological analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For
June 12
, 2018

Navy Reserve Radioman 2nd Class Julius H.O. Pieper, 19

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from World War II, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Reserve Radioman 2nd Class Julius H.O. Pieper, 19, of Esmond, South Dakota, accounted for on Nov. 15, 2017, will be buried June 19 at the Normandy American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer, France. On June 19, 1944, Pieper was a member of Landing Ship Tank Number 523 (LST-523), off the coast of Normandy, France. The ship exploded and sank after striking an underwater mine, killing Pieper. In the years following the incident, his remains were not recovered or identified. Pieper’s twin brother, Radioman 2nd Class Ludwig J. Pieper, was also killed in the attack, but his remains were recovered after the incident and buried at the Normandy American Cemetery in France. Julius will be buried next to his brother. 

Recently discovered records show that in September 1961, French salvage divers dismantled the LST-523 and turned over potential remains discovered to U.S. authorities. The remains, designated as Unknown X-9352, were found in the Radio Room of LST-523.

The remains could not be identified and were interred in Ardennes American Cemetery in Belgium as an Unknown. 

After a thorough historical and scientific analysis, it was determined that X-9352 could likely be identified. After receiving approval, on April 11, 2017, Unknown X-9352 was disinterred from Ardennes American Cemetery and sent to DPAA.

To identify Pieper’s remains, DPAA used laboratory analysis, including dental, anthropological and chest radiograph comparison analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 12, 2018

 

Army Maj. Stephen T. Uurtamo, 32

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, recently accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Maj. Stephen T. Uurtamo, 32, of Chicago, accounted for on Sept. 27, 2017, will be buried June 19 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. In late November 1950, Uurtamo was a member of Headquarters Battery, 82nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, which was engaged in persistent attacks with the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) near the Ch’ongch’on River in North Korea. On Nov. 30, 1950, the Division began to withdraw south along the Main Supply Route, known as “The Gauntlet.” During the withdrawal, the 82nd lost many Soldiers, one of whom was Uurtamo who was declared missing in action as of Dec. 1, 1950, when he could not be accounted for.

Following the war, several returning American prisoners of war reported that Uurtamo had been captured and died at the prisoner of war transient camp, known as Hofong Camp, in North Korea in January 1951. Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared Uurtamo deceased on Jan. 21, 1951.

In April 2005, a joint U.S./Korean People’s Army Recovery team recovered 32 sets of remains from a site south of Unsan, North Korea. Based on the recovered material evidence and surrounding conditions, it was determined this was a secondary burial site. 

To identify Uurtamo’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial (mtDNA), Y-chromosome (Y-STR) and autosomal (auSTR) DNA analysis, anthropological analysis, as well as circumstantial evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

Soldier Killed from Korean War Accounted For
June 12, 2018

Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker, 20,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, accounted-for from the Korean War, are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Sgt. Donald L. Baker, 20, of Thornton, Arkansas, accounted for on Jan. 25, 2018, will be buried June 19 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In September 1950, Baker was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was reported missing in action on Sept. 6, 1950, as a result of fighting that occurred between his unit and enemy forces near Haman, South Korea.

Following the battle, the U.S. Army Graves Registration Services (AGRS) created Field Search Cases (FSCs) to track unaccounted-for service members, assigning Baker to FSC 182-F. AGRS teams searched battlefields for remains and interred recovered remains at temporary cemeteries in South Korea. FSC 182-F contained 34 associated individuals who corresponded to Baker’s unit. Because of the lack of evidence to verify identity, some of the remains recovered in late September 1950 were buried as “Unknowns.”

On January 6, 1951, a set of unidentified remains recovered southwest of Haman, labeled as “Unknown X-209 Masan,” were interred at United Nations Military Cemetery (UNMC) in Masan, South Korea. 

In January 1955, the remains were declared to be unidentifiable and were transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery in the Pacific (NMCP) in Honolulu, known as the Punchbowl.